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torakris

tonkatsu

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katsu-ni teishoku

So what is this?

a teishoku is a set. It is usually a ~~teishoku, the ~~ being the name of the main dish, common ones being shogayaki (gingered pork) teishoku, corroke (croquette) teishoku, karaage (deep fried chicken) teishoku, etc.

The katsu-ni I guess could be called a simmered tonkatsu, ni is from the verb niru which means to simmer, its is made exactly katsu don (tonkatsu rice bowl) except the katsu isn't placed directly on the rice.

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Jason,

BTW, what's the Japanese take on "The Last Samurai" ?

My Japanese staff thought that is was a great movie, for the entertainment value. All of them, though, mentioned that, "We don't have those trees in Japan". Loses points in authenticity, but they thought the human drama was pretty realistic.

For tonkatsu lovers, get yourself to Tonki, in Meguro. Their panko is made to their specifications, and the triple-dip method, going into huge vats of hot oil, makes for the tonkatsu experience that you'll compare all else to.

MM

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I can't seem to get tonkatsu out of my mind and when picking out lunch at the local convenience store today I just had to have the miso-katsu don. It was a little on the expensive side as far as bentos in a conbini go, about US$5, but it was actually quite good! :biggrin:

i4472.jpg

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There are basically two types of tonkatsu:

ロースかつ (roh-su katsu), which uses pork loin

http://list.excite.co.jp/item/30745952

and

ひれかつ (hire katsu), which uses fillet

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/kodaworld/548222/566393/

I once liked hire katsu better because it is less fatty, but at present, I am totally a roh-su katsu lover.

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funny, at one time all I would eat was rosu-katsu, now I am definitely a hire-katsu person!! :biggrin:

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Ok, simple question that may have been answered before.

Where is the best Tonkatsu in Tokyo ?

I keep seeing Tonki and Maisen mentioned and will definitely give one or both of them a go but any other opinions are welcome.

Thanks in advance

Rick

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I have already recommended Sankin at Yotsuya, Shinjuku ward, somewhere else in the Japan Forum. The tonkatsu there is superb and I like the atmosphere of the shop, uncommon for a tonkatsu shop.

http://gourmet.yahoo.co.jp/gourmet/restaur...03/P000817.html

(Sorry, Japanese only)

If you prefer a restaurant chain, Wako may be the right place for you.

http://www.wako-group.co.jp/02shop_01restaurant-s.html

(Japanese only)

See also:

http://www.ehills.co.jp/rp/dfw/EHILLS/mori...ako/index_e.php

(English)

http://www.aquacity.co.jp/en/shop116/s_rest_41-47.html

(English)

The second link is a page of http://www.aquacity.co.jp/en/index.html

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Wako is the restaurant I went to that I commented on in the tonkatsu thread, don't think I gave its name though.....

Excellent tonkatsu, though I don't have too much to compare it to as I have only been to eat tonkatsu twice in the past couple years and both times were branches of this store.

Both times and both locations (both in Yokohama) the places were packed and the wait was quite long.

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You might also give Katsukura in the Shinjuku Takashimaya building restaurant complex a try. Katsuyoshi in the Ebisu Garden Place complex is also very good, although I would personally rate Maisen and Katsukura slightly higher.

When ordering at these places, please make sure that you order the highest grade of Pork available(Kurobuta pork). The highest grade comes in both "Fire" and "Rosu" and it will cost you around 3,000 Yen and it is usually indicated clearly on the menu. I personally prefer Fire to Rosu, but my suggestion is that you try both cuts, especially if you are two or more eating since the pork will be served cut on a plate and you can easily share.

I would pass on Wako for the best Tonkatsu, it does not compare to Maisen or Katsukura in my opinion.

One place that has been recommended to me but I have not been able to try is Enraku, 6-22-7 Shinbashi

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Thanks for the tips. Looks like Maisen wins on account of views here and on other forums/reviews.

Is Katsukura a chain ? I believe I went to one last time I was in Tokyo. It was in the Roppongi Hills complex. I think I opted for the slightly fattier version on offer which was very good ! I must admit I was a bit confused to start with as to what to do with all the condiments that come with it. That was until the nice Japanese lady next to me showed me the 'ritual' of Tonkatsu :biggrin:

Do 'fire' and 'Rosu' refer to lean and fattier ?

Rgds

Rick

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Do 'fire' and 'Rosu' refer to lean and fattier ?

Rgds

Rick

"Fire" or "hire" = filet, from the tenderloin. It's a lean cut. "Rosu" = roast (shoulder?), which is fattier.

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Katsukura is a chain and they have a branch in Roppongi Hills(I have not tried it). Maisen also has a branch in RH but it is a take-out place and I would not recommend it(go to the main branch in Omote Sando). Katsukubo Wako also has a branch in RH.

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Over in this thread I thought I wanted to make schnitzel. Apparently not. :blink: What I want to make is tonkatsu.

So, never having done this before, I'm putting myself into your hands good people. Advise me on how to put this together. What kind of oil should I use to fry them in? Do I put any spices in the panko?

This is for dinner tonight so I need help now :biggrin:

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Over in this thread  I thought I wanted to make schnitzel.  Apparently not. :blink:    What I want to make is tonkatsu.

So, never having done this before, I'm putting myself into your hands good people.  Advise me on how to put this together.  What kind of oil should I use to fry them in?  Do I put any spices in the panko? 

This is for dinner tonight so I need help now :biggrin:

Vegetable oil is fine. No spices in the panko.

for assembly, use 1 beaten egg, flour (about 1/4 to 1/3 c. is fine) and panko. Coat in flour, then in the egg, and then the panko. Fry until golden brown. be sure to season the pork first (salt and pepper) before breading it.

Soba

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marlene,

good luck with your tonkatsu! :biggrin:

I think I feel a tonkatsu mood coming on too....

It is really easy just as Soba described, any flavorless oil should be fine and no special spices needed.

I had a Korean friend who would smear both sides of the pork with that bottled minced garlic before coating it and it was wonderful I didn't even need sauce with it.

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It was amazing. It was awesome. I'm am so in love with Panko breadcrumbs.

gallery_6080_240_1097889595.jpg

I really suck at picture taking and presentation. I have no idea if this is how it is supposed to look, but it was the most amazing dish.

:wub:

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Ummm, tonkatsu...

That looks about right, Marlene! In Japan in would be sliced up to make it easy to serve with chopsticks, and would have very thinly threaded cabbage on the side (the Japanese version of saurkraut).

Now I'm seriously craving tonkatsu!

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I made some "tonkatsu" the other day....

Actually, it is 2/3 ground pork and 1/3 ground turkey, topped with a goma-tonkatsu sauce using goma (sesame) I toasted and ground up in the suribachi.

Also, I wanted to try and put some shiso flavor into it, so half of the patties were made with the addition of shiso-furikake (bascially shiso + salt), and half without....but I couldn't tell the difference. :sad:

It is on a bed of cabbage (eaten with ponzu sauce), and some okara, and a seaweed salad. The bamboo leaf is for you all. :biggrin:

tonkatsu.jpg

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I made some "tonkatsu" the other day....

Actually, it is 2/3 ground pork and 1/3 ground turkey,

I would call yours 'menchi katsu' rather than 'tonkatsu' (ton = pork) :biggrin: .

Anyway, I like them both.

Edit to add a link to menchi katsu thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...48856&hl=menchi


Edited by Hiroyuki (log)

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sometimes I get katsu cravings and need to rush out to the store at 2am (thank god for 24hr supermarkets) to get 2 pork chops. As you can guess I usually make it spontaniously and do not always have tonkatsu sauce on hand. the way I make it produces something very similar to bulldog brand. All that I do is put the amount of ketchup that I want the sauce to be in a bowl and then add worchester sauce until the flavor and color is right. Then I usually suribachi up some sesame seeds and add them. I take the bone off the chop and cut the chop so it is half the thickness and then pound it out using the bottom of the same fry pan i use to fry it. if i have cabbage I shred some and serve with rice donburi style. I too can't resist katsu curry. 2 chops means 4 meals worth of katsu goodness. I might need to run out and get some right now...

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I made pork chops over the weekend that were kind of like tonkatsu... thicker than the usual cutlets, but with the panko breading. I had to get a little creative since my eldest can't tolerate egg.

I made my own tonkatsu sauce using ketchup, worcestershire sauce and grape jelly.

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Is there a recipe for tonkatsu sauce floating around anywhere, or is it preferable to buy bottled sauce?

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