Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Beef Short Ribs -- The Topic


mamster
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thanks to everyone who has gotten into short ribs. It's a treat that was introduced to me by my son and his Korean wife. They make Korean Short Ribs or Bulkogi at least twice a week and it's cooked on a outdoor grill, gas or charcoal. Basic marinade for one night in the fridge is cup of soy sauce, ginger, Oriental red pepper flakes, garlic (whole, minced, chopped, etc.), green onion chopped fine, carrot pieces if you want. The Korean method is to place the meat on the grill and cook medium well and until the outside is dark and crisp. Serve in thin slices over rice or kimchee. I know how to do all this, but have failed to find alternatives. You guys have helped and I am grateful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone who has gotten into short ribs. It's a treat that was introduced to me by my son and his Korean wife. They make Korean Short Ribs or Bulkogi at least twice a week and it's cooked on a outdoor grill, gas or charcoal.

Don't forget to try kalbi tchim - Korean-style soy braised short ribs. Similar marinade, brown in a dutch oven, add the marinade and water to almost cover, and slow braise for a good few hours until the meat is virtually falling off the bone. Char-grilled kalbi is of course sensational, but there are times when braised short ribs are even more satisfying. There's something about slow-cooked meat on the bone that is just so damn good.

Problem for me here in Britain is that short ribs are not a normal cut of meat, so I'm living a life of deprivation. Occasionally I ask my butcher nicely to prepare some for me, but it's quite a fag to do so and the result is never quite the same as I grew up on.

I sometimes dream of kalbi...

MP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Problem for me here in Britain is that short ribs are not a normal cut of meat, so I'm living a life of deprivation. Occasionally I ask my butcher nicely to prepare some for me, but it's quite a fag to do so and the result is never quite the same as I grew up on.

If you're in city with a kosher butcher go in and order flanken. They should carry the cut.

Edited by bloviatrix (log)

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

porkribs.JPG

Chinese vinegar is the dark one that is normally used for dipping jiaozi.

Boil ribs for one hour with herbs. Marinate for as long as 1 day. Remove the ribs, incorporate corn starch to the marinade, and paint on the ribs while they cook (either under the broiler or on the barbeque) to make a thick brown sweet/sour sauce.

:smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first and still favorite foray into short ribs was Thomas Keller's "Pot Au Feu" from the French Laundry Cookbook. It consists of marinated boneless shortribs seared and then braised (in a very strong homemade white veal stock)for about 6 hours I think, then refridgerated, wrapped in caul fat, seared again and warmed in the sauce. Roasted bone marrow tops the whole deal, I just made myself verrrrry hungry.

Shannon

my new blog: http://uninvitedleftovers.blogspot.com

"...but I'm good at being uncomfortable, so I can't stop changing all the time...be kind to me, or treat me mean...I'll make the most of it I'm an extraordinary machine."

-Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

When cooking short-ribs, I usually just brown and then braise in some sort of red wine/broth mix. But in looking over some recipes for short ribs by two big-wig chefs (Trotter and Keller), I was struck by the fact that both have you marinate the ribs in wine overnight. I'm curious about this. Does it really have an effect? Seems to me that the long braising time would infuse the wine flavor enough and marinating would be superfluous (and it certainly doesn't have anything to do with tenderizing, as they'll get tender enough with braising). Can anyone explain why they advocate marinating short ribs overnight?

Chris Sadler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When cooking short-ribs, I usually just brown and then braise in some sort of red wine/broth mix. But in looking over some recipes for short ribs by two big-wig chefs (Trotter and Keller), I was struck by the fact that both have you marinate the ribs in wine overnight. I'm curious about this. Does it really have an effect? Seems to me that the long braising time would infuse the wine flavor enough and marinating would be superfluous (and it certainly doesn't have anything to do with tenderizing, as they'll get tender enough with braising). Can anyone explain why they advocate marinating short ribs overnight?

As meat goes, short ribs are pretty "stringy" and tough. Like any acidic marinade, the wine will denature the protein and tenderize the ribs. The longer the better, so overnight sounds about right. I do this with a whole London Broil as well - stick it in a big zip-lock bag with wine and seasonings, close the bag almost the whole way and suck out as much air as possible so the meat is really coated closely by the wine. Works like a charm - you can cut the meat with your fork by the time it'd done. :cool:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As meat goes, short ribs are pretty "stringy" and tough. Like any acidic marinade, the wine will denature the protein and tenderize the ribs. The longer the better, so overnight sounds about right. I do this with a whole London Broil as well - stick it in a big zip-lock bag with wine and seasonings, close the bag almost the whole way and suck out as much air as possible so the meat is really coated closely by the wine. Works like a charm - you can cut the meat with your fork by the time it'd done. :cool:

Well, I can see marinating London Broil, but that's cooked "dry" and quickly. If you're braising short ribs, I can't see the reason either (three hours braising in wine or beer will make the toughest short rib meat fall off the bone).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As meat goes, short ribs are pretty "stringy" and tough.  Like any acidic marinade, the wine will denature the protein and tenderize the ribs.  The longer the better, so overnight sounds about right. 

Keller says this isn't the reason he does it: "Marinating does not tenderize meat, and alcohol doesn't either".

Chris Sadler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep - this is another one of those cooking myths, like salting water to keep vegetables green or sealing meat to keep in juices.

Wine does not tenderise meat - if anything it has a drying effect. It may well add flavour though.

I love animals.

They are delicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Base for protein, acid for bone...

What the acidity in the wine may do is make the bone more porous and allow some of the flavors from the cooking of the bone better access to the rib meat.

But, wine, being a biological product filled with (yes, this is true) the spilled contents of grape cells and yeast cells is quite a milieu of wonderous proteases, polymerases, ligases, restriction enzymes, etc etc etc some of which may still be active, most of which are not anymore. To say that it's the acidity of the wine doing all of the work... eah

Suffice it to say it does something... magical

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep - this is another one of those cooking myths, like salting water to keep vegetables green or sealing meat to keep in juices.

Wine does not tenderise meat - if anything it has a drying effect. It may well add flavour though.

I can't say I agree with anything you just wrote.

On to the subjest. Marinating a cooking are two different things, that produce two different results. Just use a wine that you would also drink. Something not from a box.

"He could blanch anything in the fryolator and finish it in the microwave or under the salamander. Talented guy."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is another one of those tough ones... a legend like Keller is hard to argue with, but it's not the wine itself that 'tenderizes' the meat - it's the alcohol. As Katie points out, the alcohol denatures the protien in the beef, which at an optimal point of tenderizing will lead to less 'stringy' meat. If you leave the meat in the marinade too long, it will end up being mushy.

I braise weekly, and to be honest, I no longer marinate the short ribs in wine since it has a minimal effect on the final dish. If you do marinate it, you'll find that the meat is less 'stringly' but more slushy/mushy. I prefer to go the non-marinade route and allow the meat to chill in its braising liquid for a few days to mellow a little, which I find leads to a much tastier dish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the best way to find out what kind of impact does the marinating of short ribs overnight has is to actually execute this method and then taste it. I have seen chefs marinate whole beef tenderloins in red wine for up to three days with garlic and rosemary. At Tru, a restaurant in Chicago, they marinate their tenderloin in extravirgin olive oil, rosemary, and garlic overnight.

I would think that by marinating overnight it will serve to impart some great flavor to the meat. Also, Thomas Keller uses the marinating liquid as the braising liquid, too, after he clairifies it. I would think that the braising liquid has some initial flavor from the shortribs even before the braising process has been started.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've done the short ribs both ways -omitting the marinating when I have been short of time. There is no doubt in my find that a couple of days prior marination produced a more flavorful and succulent dish.

Ruth Friedman

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
This is another one of those tough ones... a legend like Keller is hard to argue with, but it's not the wine itself that 'tenderizes' the meat - it's the alcohol.

Keller's red wine marinade has the alcohol cooked off, so alcohol tenderizing the meat has nothing to do with it. I'm pretty sure it's all about flavor....

#1456/5000

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
I had braised short ribs with kumquats at a restaurant last night, they were outstanding. The aromatics from the fruit were wonderful. Any idea of a recipe thats published or that I can modify to make this dish at home?

Jim

Hmmmm short ribs are on the menu for tomorrow night (they should have been a couple of days ago but the butcher screwed up). Anyway -- with kumquats??? -- gotta think about that.

Sidecar Ron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try braising your shortribs in orange juice and star anise, chicken stock and a touch of honey; and then top the cooked short ribs with a kumquat gelee and some sea salt, and pour the sauce around the base. Gelee's are pretty straightfoward - just cooking the fruit adding pectin and referigerating till firm, cut into squares or just scoop in on (see the Christmas Bon Appetite if you still have it around). Mashed sweet potatoes would be good with that and maybe some roasted beets, parsely root or turnips.

Hope that helps

Life is so brief that we should not glance either too far backwards or forwards…therefore study how to fix our happiness in our glass and in our plate.

A.L.B. Grimod de la Reyniere

'Almanach des gourmands'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I've brined beef chuck roasts on a few occasions and would agree with the synopsis, of flavor enhancer. I've read other peeps say that beef turns mushy when brined, that has not been my experience.

While I must say, that about 4 hours has been my uppermost limit regarding brine time with beef.

woodburner

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i do'nt get the point of brining something before braising. the flavor is going to be absorbed into the meat anyways.

Kind of my thought......wouldn't you just infuse the flavors of your braising liquid?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems to me to be an unnecessary step with questionable results. Braising is about long slow cooking in a liquad to break down fibers and infuse flavor. the consenses seems to be -- does nothing good.

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...