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Susan in FL

Bagna Cauda

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A favorite thing to eat, tonight we added steamed shrimp, to make a meal of it. Any good accounts of Bagna Cauda to share?

I've got just enough sauce left to have the traditional scrambled eggs tomorrow morning!

What wine to accompany Bagna Cauda? 1998 LAN Rioja Crianza was a real good match this time.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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To me that's crudites with shrimp. What's the difference. What's the sauce?


True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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Bagna cauda, literally "hot bath" is a Piedmontese dish that usually consists of a garlicky sauce used to dip sliced vegetables, chunks of meat or seafood, or pieces of bread. You can also use it to sauce pasta such as spaghetti or linguini, or as Susan suggests, for scrambled eggs the day after.

Traditionally, bagna cauda is made with equal proportions of unsalted butter to EVOO, along with garlic, anchovies, and either shaved white or black truffles. I prefer to use oil-packed anchovies to the usual salt-packed kind. I also briefly soak the garlic in a little milk to mellow the flavor slightly.

You want to keep the bagna cauda warmed throughout the meal. Fondue pots work fairly well.

For such a simple sauce, there are innumerable variations. One version calls for a splash of white truffle oil added prior to service. :blink: This is one dish where less is more.

Soba

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John Mariani's recipe calls for a chopped white truffle! :blink: I don't think that would be how I would choose to use a white truffle...

For years, we've used the same recipe of gently heating the EVOO with minced garlic, anchovies, and a pinch of fennel seeds, just enough to flavor the oil and being careful not to cook it too much. Then, I take it off the heat and whisk in the butter, so the butter doesn't break down. If you do choose to keep the sauce warmed while you're eating this and you have a flame under the serving, be careful it's not too hot or the butter will break down.

Usually we don't make a meal of it like yesterday, and have it for an appetizer or first course, limiting the selection of vegetables. My favorite are the steamed baby potatoes and the Belgian endives, green or yellow squash, mushrooms, and cauliflower. And, yum... cooked baby artichokes. I couldn't find any fresh ones for yesterday.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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:biggrin: looks great! our family has a bagns caulda feast every year in the fall when the root vegys are harvested. big glass of red wine and good crusty bread is all you need! i have a picture of our feast but im not sure how to post it??

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It celebrates Italys wine harvest,

Cardoons are a very important vegetable used in Bagna cauda.

The garlic and anchovies where put in a black couldren over a fire and aloud to slowly melt into the olive oil.

You then would dip your veggies in the oil and holding a piece of italian bread under the veggies bring it to your mouth and let the bread absord the oil.

It's not a crudite, it really emphises the fall vegetable harvest and Vina novela wines.


Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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(Smacks self on forhead)

Oh my god!!!!! This is what I had in some restaurant in FLorence. I have been searching for this for three years!!!! COuld never describe it well enough for someone to realize what it was. I didn't realize that it was Bagna Cauda.


True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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:smile: Hope you didn't hit yourself too hard, and glad you found out what it was you enjoyed!

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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