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Fried Chicken


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Going the other way, I'll sometimes poach chicken thighs in buttermilk and wine and chiles, double bread, and fry. In which case all I need to care about is the crust.

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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This may also have to do with the coating you are using. I used to think it was a cool idea to include pulverized corn flakes in my fried chicken coating for added crunch. But corn has too much sugar in it, and the exterior was always way too dark by the time the interior was cooked,

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This may also have to do with the coating you are using.  I used to think it was a cool idea to include pulverized corn flakes in my fried chicken coating for added crunch.  But corn has too much sugar in it, and the exterior was always way too dark by the time the interior was cooked,

I hadn't thought of that -- good point.

For crunch, you might try corn meal. Even plain Kellogg's Corn Flakes have substantial added sugar.

Dave Scantland
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Eat more chicken skin.

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With most fried foods, if it's going to overcolor before it's done in the center, you can drop it in a hot oven to bake until it finishes. I've salvaged all sorts of fried foods that I inadvertedly fried at too high a temperature this way: hush puppies, egg rolls that I should have defrosted before frying, etc.

Good point, and I've done this often, sometimes deliberately;chicken drumsticks pop immediately to mind. A spell in the oven in no way detracts from the crispiness of the coating.

And welcome, mpav.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

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Some good ideas here, and thanks to all; and thanks for the welcome, maggiethecat.

My coating is flour, egg and milk and flour a second time. It gets plenty crisp, even before it gets dark.

I seem to have two possible courses of action: frying then finishing in the oven, or poaching before breading. As I recall, my mother used to poach the chicken first. Now I know why. Next time I fry chicken (which might be a couple of months off) I'll report back.

Thanks again.

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Here in the South, we can get way too serious on the subject of fried chicken. But my method, handed down and confirmed in too many soul-food excursions, is to put the lid on for the first 20-30 minutes, turning the chicken halfway through, then take the lid off for the final 10 minutes per side, to brown it and crisp the skin.

I've also started using an electric skillet. It may not as "honored" as my well-seasoned cast iron, but it's an easy way to control the heat.

Kathleen Purvis, food editor, The Charlotte (NC) Observer

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Going the other way, I'll sometimes poach chicken thighs in buttermilk and wine and chiles, double bread, and fry. In which case all I need to care about is the crust.

Jin... great idea. I never thought of that. Maybe that is the answer to the monster chickens.

mpav... Welcome. The reason I call them monster chickens... It seems that it is very hard to find chickens these days that aren't 4 pounds are more. 2 1/2 to 3 lbs used to be considered a "fryer" I think. At that size, the pieces aren't so big that they get too brown before cooking through. And I will swear that the breasts and thighs that come in packs are from even bigger chickens.

Take a look at this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...n+fried+chicken

OH... Buy a thermometer. :smile:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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  • 6 months later...

It means the peices of chicken are fried in a dutch oven or cast iron pan, as opposed to a deep fryer. Otherwise known as "southern style" fried chicken.

See the "Fried Chicken Anyone" thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=7582

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Pan fried chicken is the kind that you have about and inch or two of grease in a cast iron pan, and you have to turn over, not the kind that you deep fry in a fryer. I think he even describes it somewhere.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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Thanks...I assumed it wasn't deep fried, but what kind of crust? batter? Is there a particular spice combination typical in the Louisana area? What is commonly used for the crust? Dipped in buttermilk first? And fried in what kind of oil?

Obviously it looks like I'm going to have to venture south to answer all these questions!

Edited by hathor (log)
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i1164.jpg

Here's some Pan Fried Chicken and Black Eyed Peas, served at Dunbar's Soul Food Restaurant in New Orleans.

i1172.jpg

And Austin Leslie's famous fried chicken from Jacques-Imos restaurant in New Orleans, which now has a branch in NYC (and serving this at $14 a plate!)

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Hathor: Crystal is very similar to Tabasco, its one of the various different brands of Louisiana Hot Sauce. Crystal (and basically every other basic hot sauce in the world) differs from Tabasco in that the peppers it comes from are not salt aged in barrel for 3 years, its made pretty quickly with just some salt and vinegar added, and I think its made from Cayennes, not Tabasco peppers, so it does taste a little different. I find most of the Louisiana hot sauces pretty interchangeable.

http://www.baumerfoods.com/

Like Tabasco, Crystal makes a full line of other condiment products flavored with their signature sauce.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Thanks...I assumed it wasn't deep fried, but what kind of crust? batter? Is there a particular spice combination typical in the Louisana area? What is commonly used for the crust? Dipped in buttermilk first? And fried in what kind of oil?

Obviously it looks like I'm going to have to venture south to answer all these questions!

There are probably a zillion different answers to these questions.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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Some thirty-plus years ago my ex-husband's mother taught me how to make pan-fried chicken, and way back in the day, I loved it... Dip chicken parts in egg and then in a seasoned flour mixture, and pan-fry in bacon fat, in a cast-iron skillet! My how times have changed.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I forget if I gave my "recipe" on the Fried Chicken thread, so here goes:

Make a brine and add lots of lemon juice and hot sauce. Add chicken parts and soak for however long.

Mix in a bag: all-purpose flour, Old Bay (a lot!), and maybe even some finely ground black pepper (I like my chicken salty and peppery)

Heat an inch or so of canola oil or corn or canola/corn blend in a cast-iron or other heavy, straight-sided skillet. Very hot.

Take a few pieces of chicken out of the brine, shake of most but not all of the brine, drop in the flour, shake shake shake. Take out and place in hot oil, skin side down. Cook until the right color (you'll know). Turn over and cook some more, until done. Place on a rack over a baking sheet and keep warm in a very low oven while you do the same with the rest of the pieces.

When all the chicken pieces have been cooked, pour out the oil (VERY carefully), add some of the flour to the skillet to make a roux, add some chicken stock, and boil it up for gravy. Mmmm over grits! :biggrin:

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