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Lobster recipes


adp1906
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I gotta say thats a pretty tall order. Personally i go for West coast spiny lobster split and grilled, lemon, butter, tortillas if i'm feeling like it ala puerto neuvo-although those are usally deep fried :).

Maine Lobster purists would go for steamed or boiled in salt water, or clambake style with corn, potato, clams, seaweed, etc...

A quick blanch in salted water(1-2 mins) and shocked will give you a lobster that can be split with the meat removed easily-Maine lobster cook the claws longer. These can then be butter poached, stuffed with...you name it-breadcrumbs, bay shrimp, cheese(some say heresy), chopped fresh herbs, etc and broiled.

Tail can be cut through the shell, floured or not, seared and finished for a la amoracaine(sp). Or medallions sauteed and finished with white wine, tomato, fresh herbs, over pasta. Add chile flake for fra diavolo-devils style.

Boil till done and serve hot with risotto. Serve cold with a fines herbes mayo for a nice salad or app. Wrap sole filet around a mousseline studded with lobster "nuggets" and shallow poach, finish cuisson wth butter and herbs for sauce.

Stir fry medallions with garlic and chinese black beans, ginger. Steam split with tamarind sauce over.

Really need an idea of what you want here......

hth, danny

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If you know how to kill it quickly with a chefs knife, a roasted lobster is very nice.

Split the lobster down the middle, but don't separate the halves. Drizzle garlic butter over the interior & bake in a hot oven until done. This will vary depending on size.

Advantages:

a] Lobster is ready to plate

b] May avoid having to cook lobsters in batches, if your pot isn't big enough.

c] You can dispense with the drawn butter.

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There are twp type of lobsters, live Maine lobsters and I forgot the other! Seriously, like many foods, fresh is better and a live lobster of any type is far superior to a frozen crayfish tail. Just take a live lobster and boil for 8-10 minutes for 1.25# version. Many times we boil for 8 minutes and quickly chill. The claws are done and tail is rare, suitable for medallions to be used in many dishes. Last weekend Browne Trading flew some in and they were prepared as just discussed. The medallions were used in a lobster/peekytoe Napolean and the shells for a Lobster Americain sauce for pasta and the claws for a cold appetizer served with a dash of white pepper, sea salt and lemon. -Dick

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Does anyone have any good lobster recipes?

Thanks  :smile:

Hell yes.

I guess it's hard for us to resist spouting out our knowledge of lobsters and asking what type of recipe you're looking for and pointing out how boiled fresh lobster is the best recipe... (I've always wished I had so many lobsters that I had to look up recipes for variations of how to eat it.) Having said that :laugh: ...

I love lobster pasta recipes, and usually don't follow a recipe precisely, but here are a couple that I like for ideas.

Maria Batali's Recipe for Fettucine with Lobster Pantelleria-Style;

I make lobster and pasta with a cream sauce and don't really use a recipe, but here is a guide...

Upper Deck Lobster and Pasta;

Lobster ravioli is good. So is lobster bisque, and for that I usually kind of sort of follow a recipe for shrimp bisque. I also like to make lobster risotto once in a while.

Hope these ideas help.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Don't boil a Maine lobster -- it will be water-logged. Steam it. Simply put a couple of inches of water in a big pot, add a two or three tablespoons of salt (I like to simulate ocean water), bring it to a boil, pop in the lobsters, cover, and wait 'til their done (12-15 minutes, for a small 1-1/4 pounder when your steaming it, 20 minutes or so for a two-pounder).

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Don't boil a Maine lobster -- it will be water-logged.
I beg to differ, but as they say, to each his own. We've cooked (including boiling) many a lobster, mostly Maine, and it has never been "water-logged."

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Don't boil a Maine lobster -- it will be water-logged.
I beg to differ, but as they say, to each his own. We've cooked (including boiling) many a lobster, mostly Maine, and it has never been "water-logged."

It's really not about your lobster being water logged,

The steaming, aposed to boiling encases the flesh with a softer heat (yet very hot) the lack of turbalence and direct water heat will yield a much more tender beast.

Boiled lobster also sheads it's coligen into the water, as a steamed lobsters cologen is trapped

Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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Steamed is good if you don't live right on the beach (and preferably far from a marina or other known source of pollution). . . but if you are lucky enough to be on the water, go down and fill up your lobstah pot with ocean water. Boil that sucker. Sweetest ever--and table salt, unfortunately, doesn't work anywhere near as well. Go figure. . . :hmmm:

agnolottigirl

~~~~~~~~~~~

"They eat the dainty food of famous chefs with the same pleasure with which they devour gross peasant dishes, mostly composed of garlic and tomatoes, or fisherman's octopus and shrimps, fried in heavily scented olive oil on a little deserted beach."-- Luigi Barzini, The Italians

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  • 4 weeks later...
Corn and lobster chowder

Oh boy! :wub: Thanks for doing the legwork to find THAT one! I'm lucky enough to have a diving fisherfolk living next door, who brought over 3 shovelnose lobster tails a while back. What to do, what to do...started digging through the posts here, and voilá. Dinner is served. :laugh:

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Lived for many years in New England and cannot think of a better use of lobster than baked/stuffed (OK, lobster americaine, but that takes a day and we can knock off the baked/stuffed in less than an hour).

Just take the bug, 1 and ½ to 2 pounds, this is not for chix, and stick it with a butcher’s knife in the cross in the head (take a look, it is easy to find).

The lobster dies immediately.

Cut it the long way down the belly side, but not all the way through, including the tail.

Now it is split open and you can remove the head sac, it comes out very easily, the vein, and can wash away the tomalley, and roe (if any), if you wish.

Then make a stuffing with crabmeat, sautéed onion and bell pepper in butter, Old Bay spice, and crushed (to a powder) Ritz crackers. It also works well with scallops, shrimp, even phony crab.

Stuff the body and bake until done (about 15-20 minutes at 350, depending upon the size),

When we lived in New England lobsters were fairly cheap and we could make the dish, from live lobster to finished product, in less than an hour.

Great when folks were coming to dinner after work on a Friday night.

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