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Okra


Mayhaw Man
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Personally, I like Okra OK, it's not my favorite vegetable, but when prepared well and not too slimy or stringy (I let them go too long in the garden last year, big, but fibrous), they're pretty good.

Now, support this thread!

  • Okra is good for you and full of calcium:
The Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know About Your Baby from Birth to Age Two. From page 151: "You don't need to drink milk to make milk, cows don't! ... you can get all of the bone-building minerals you need from (these) calcium rich non-dairy foods: (long list deleted, but it includes) okra...."
Or, if you're not planning on breast feeding any time soon, you may prefer to Eat Right for Your Type (by Peter J. D'Adamo). This book lists okra as "Highly Beneficial" for several bloodtypes.
Even Weight Watchers wants you to eat okra.
And, according to Linda Gassenheimer, author of Low-Carb Meals in Minutes, okra is "low and carbohydrates" and you can "eat as many of these vegetables as you like." I assume that wouldn't include breaded and deep fried?
Prefer to read a novel? Someone upthread mentioned okra in Indian cooking, check out Life of Pi by Yann Martel. From Page 244: "... pickle, all served with the usual nans, popadoms, parathas and puris, of course." "Sounds---?' "The salads! Mango curd salad and okra curd salad and plain fresh cucumber salad. And for dessert, almond payasam and milk payasam and jaggery pancake and peanut ..."
There are even more references to okra in Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees. This one (from page 152) sounds particularly alluring: "The whole house smelled like fried okra. Rosaleen was setting the table in the kitchen while May dipped down in the grease and brought up the golden kernals. I don't know what had brought on the okra, since it was usually balogna sandwiches...."
Prefer to grow your own okra? Compare how Gurney's Hybrid Annie Oakley II does versus Clemson Spineless 80.
Don't forget red okra. I got some from the Ferry Plaza Farmer's Market last year that fried up mighty tasty! Made a fine gumbo, too.
OK, Squeat, here you go: Red Burgundy Okra.

OK, one more, and this is obviously the result of an imbedded keyword search list, but it is a great product: ORKA Silicone Oven Mitt.

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No! No! A thousand times No!

Missouri native. Parents loved the stuff, tried for years to get me to eat it. I learned to like broccoli, even asparagus, but never never could stomach the okra.

OTOH I loved Brussels sprouts from the get-go. Go figger.

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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Yes, indeed. Steamed and served with butter and salt.

Thanks for the suggestion! I shall have it this weekend and report back on its wubbiness.

:smile:

Jamie

Steamed and served with butter and salt :wub:

:laugh:

Jamie

See! Antony, that revels long o' nights,

Is notwithstanding up.

Julius Caesar, Act II, Scene ii

biowebsite

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Yes, but only young'uns fried or hidden in something like a gumbo.

(I love how most of us can not possibly keep a response to just one word.)

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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Eh.

Better than nettles or termite queens.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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  • 3 weeks later...

57-y

23-n-(I only counted a thousand times no once)

1- sometimes- as it is better than nettles or termite queens :wink:

It would seem, at least among the supposedly sophisticated palates that inhabit this board, that okra is not as reviled as reputation would lead one to believe.

I will be planting my first okra of the year in the morning. I plan on occasionally posting photos of the growth progress and of the many uses to which this fine pod lends itself.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I just can't do one word answers, even when they are requested.

I was born in Oklahoma, raised in New Mexico and I love okra in any form that I have been privileged to try - fried, boiled, steamed, pickled.

My wife used to make critical comments at Furr's Cafeteria when I would order both fried okra and okra & tomatoes to accompany my meat of choice. She finally realized that I love okra.

That's a YES.

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Yesterday, I had mustard greens, collard greens, field peas, snap beans, sweet potatoes, boiled potatoes, potato salad, macaroni and cheese, corn, cabbage, but alas, no okra. :sad: Summer will be here soon, thank god.

Oh, I also had barbecue, fried chicken, pork ribs, beef ribs, pork backbone, brunswick stew, chicken and pastry, hush puppies, two cakes and sweet potato pie.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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Yesterday, I had mustard greens, collard greens, field peas, snap beans, sweet potatoes, boiled potatoes, potato salad, macaroni and cheese, corn, cabbage, but alas, no okra. :sad: Summer will be here soon, thank god.

Oh, I also had barbecue, fried chicken, pork ribs, beef ribs, pork backbone, brunswick stew, chicken and pastry, hush puppies, two cakes and sweet potato pie.

And you still live?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Yesterday, I had mustard greens, collard greens, field peas, snap beans, sweet potatoes, boiled potatoes, potato salad, macaroni and cheese, corn, cabbage, but alas, no okra.  :sad:  Summer will be here soon, thank god.

Oh, I also had barbecue, fried chicken, pork ribs, beef ribs, pork backbone, brunswick stew, chicken and pastry, hush puppies, two cakes and sweet potato pie.

And you still live?

This is a portrait of a man living a happy and fulfilling life. :laugh:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Yes. . . if it's a talk o' texas spicy pickled okra.

Otherwise no way.

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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Yes. . . if it's a talk o' texas spicy pickled okra.

Otherwise no way.

What a coincidence that I happened to open up this thread today. Since my grandparents-in-law are no longer living in the Hill Country and are now in an assisted-living facility in DC, I no longer get jar upon jar of pickled okra from them. It's a sad state of affairs, that led to my purchasing a jar Talk o' Texas spicy pickled okra when I was down there last weekend. Haven't opened it yet, though. I hope it's nearly as good as what I remember pickled okra being.

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