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Vin d'Orange

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Yes, you just missed the green walnuts for this year.

I'm going to have to live vicariously through your walnut wine experience this year, Rien. :biggrin:

Damn I can't believe I MISSED THE WALNUTS - :angry:

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I missed them too.... but not for lack of trying. Neither of my walnut trees had any green nuts on them within easy reach of any of the long-handled implements I've got at my disposal. :sad:


Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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:cool: Sorry that you missed out on the green walnuts...ask for them early next year in June...it does't take many to make Nocino.

Another old recipe from "I don't remember where" is easy and I like it even better than the "vin" recipe.

It is called French 44

Take one orange

stick it with 44 coffee beans

put it in a jar with 44 sugar cubes and a litre of vodka

leave for 44 days and filter and bottle

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<bump>

Had been waiting for tangelos to appear before makign this recipe for Vin D'Orange. I just bought many tangelos (for the recipe and for snacking!) along with a smooth sauvignon blanc. This seems like a good time to start this recipe, just in time for the holidays. I'll report back!

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I pulled out my vin de tangelo for Turkey Day and my family loved it. They loved it so much that I started a new batch this weekend with a variety of citrus fruits. I made a few adjustments to the recipe – I used kirsch instead of plain eau de vie, and I used a few Tbs of vanilla sugar instead of a whole vanilla bean. In addition, the tangelos were quite sweet, so the amount of sugar called for in the recipe needed to be adjusted down. Since I didn’t think about this beforehand, I added some lemon juice afterwards and this compensated nicely for the sweetness. I can’t wait to try batch #2!

To bottle this treat I strained repeatedly then filtered to try and get a maximum amount of the good, clear stuff. I strained the solids out of the wine first, let it settle for a few days, strained again with a cheesecloth, let it rest, then filtered to bottles. I think that because of the amount of pith and juice this wine accumulates a lot of particles at the bottom.

Thanks for the recipe! It is very adaptable and I’m excited to try new blends!

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I've checked with the walnut grower and he says that the green walnuts come at the end of June.  (He specified the Fete de St. Jean, which I think falls in the third week of June.)  I'm so excited.  Thank you for your kind advice.  I will post a vin de noix diary when it's time. 

-Lucy

I've just cracked open the first bottle of my vin de noix and it turned out quite nice. It still needs more age for spicy flavors to come to the fore, I think. I just got the "Aperitif" book as well, after I'd made batches of vin de noix and nocino. I'm thinking of making some of the walnut rosemary biscotti from the recipe in the book to snack on with a glass of one or the other.

When you make your vin de noix and nocino, definitely make enough that you can cellar bottles. Word has it that it can easily age for 3/4 years. In order to assist in this aging I bottled mine in 375 ml bottles so I could spread it out more (and give more gifts). I don't know how the smaller bottles will affect aging. I also split my batches of both vin de noix and nocino in half so I could infuse part of each with vanilla beans. To make the bottles look sharp for gifts in an authentically bistro way I cut out stencils with initials for type (VdN or NcNo - wanted it to look al/chemical), if it had vanilla (/Vn), and the "Vintage" and then filled it in with white paint. When I get my digital camera back, I'll post an image.

Ciao,

rien

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I had no access to bitter oranges, so substituted tangerines.

Aren't "seville" oranges bitter oranges?

I see them around at specialty markets. You may want to ask specifically for Seville Oranges from a grocer that you suspect might be ok with special orders.

rien

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Rien, I just stumbled on this again, I'm sorry I missed your last post! I would love to see some photos of what you ended up giving as gifts, that is if you did manage to get some shots before you gave it all away!

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In Florence we make Nocino on June 24th, St John the Baptist's holiday.

here is the recipe On my site

I put the vodka version online, but if you would like the version with Everclear, which is traditional, let me know.

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Search as I might, I can't find a thread on making vin d'orange, although I'm pretty sure I've seen it discussed here some years ago. But in any case, I want to make some this weekend.

I have bitter oranges, Provencal rosé, and eau de vie de marc. Now all I need are the right proportions. I have several recipes, gleaned from books and the web, but if someone has a tried and true recipe I'd be really grateful.

And if you happen to be interested in wines in the south of France, my recent visit to ViniSud is chronicled here.

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Now that this thread is merged, let me add that I made my vin d'orange today. I used

3 bitter oranges

3 liters rosé

600 gms sugar

700 cl eau de vie de marc

2/3 vanilla bean

1 clove

It's macerating for two weeks, and then I'll report back.

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i just bottled up this recipe (the only change was a steeping time of three weeks, as per the cookbook recipe it came from, and straining through coffee filters instead of cheesecloth, which took a ridiculously long time). my question: is this recipe fine to age at room temperature? some of the bottles have stoppered corks, and some have screw-tops -- will this affect it? if so, can i jam in corks to the other bottles, or is "corking" an official process? input appreciated (after all the fussing, it would be kind of crushing to see it get nasty).

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i just bottled up this recipe (the only change was a steeping time of three weeks, as per the cookbook recipe it came from, and straining through coffee filters instead of cheesecloth, which took a ridiculously long time).  my question:  is this recipe fine to age at room temperature?  some of the bottles have stoppered corks, and some have screw-tops -- will this affect it?  if so, can i jam in corks to the other bottles, or is "corking" an official process?  input appreciated (after all the fussing, it would be kind of crushing to see it get nasty).

i was kinda curious obout the recipe but haven't gotten around to it. i haven't seen much rose at this point in the year... if liquids are hot you kind of dialate the coffee filter and it strains much faster... i have a metal one that you buy at the super market and sometime i just heat it up with hot water so my room tempt liqueurs go through it reasonably well... cheese cloth isn't always fine enough... often i just use cloth napkins... after time small particles clump and strain much easier so like in wine making patience is necessary. in my experience room temp is fine as well as something is out of intense light. for a fortifying wine in my experience corking isn't that official. lately i only use 750 ml beer bottles and have gotten a capper for them... its the cheapest, easiest and most successful seal... your corks will probably work fine. oxidation is very important to vermouths and fortified wines... usually a thorough canning locks it in time so you need to get it to a point you like before you can it... i have stuff i put in beer bottles from a year ago that tastes like the day i canned it... oxidation through a second hand cork probably won't oxidize it to death but you can always transfer its container if you get a better method so don't worry about it too much. the screw tops probably work all right if there is little oxygen in the bottles. before i cap mine i fill them all the way up the neck... if you care nothing of pretention and presentation you can use a plastic soda bottle and squeaze out the air adjusting the size of the container to your liquid... so even if you use one ounce you can squish out all the air out again keeping it fresh... don't tell people about that technique its only for people that make their own... cheers!


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i strained my first-ever batch of vin d'orange through coffee filters until it was a beautifully clear, poured it into containers with screw or cork tops, and now, two weeks later.... it's gone cloudy again! it seems to have settled to a small cloud at the bottom of the bottle. the recipe mentioned that there would be some sediment, and you'd need to pour carefully. is this what she was talking about? i guess i was expecting something more particulate, not this nimbus. is it okay?

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i strained my first-ever batch of vin d'orange through coffee filters until it was a beautifully clear, poured it into containers with screw or cork tops, and now, two weeks later.... it's gone cloudy again!  it seems to have settled to a small cloud at the bottom of the bottle.  the recipe mentioned that there would be some sediment, and you'd need to pour carefully.  is this what she was talking about?  i guess i was expecting something more particulate, not this nimbus.  is it okay?

its ok. clowdy is just a small esthetic issue... for clarifying vermouth bentonite is recommended... if you read about beer filtration techniques you can learn alot of fining options... beer brewers have done alot to perfect small batch filtration...


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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do i need to re-filter?

you don't really need to do anything... if you want it clearer there are options but they are a little more work than just a coffee filter and they require time...

sometimes particles that were small to start will clump and settle as months (two or three) go by and then filtering them again through cloth or a coffee filter becomes very easy... wines aren't exactly ready to drink a day after fermentation... it won't kill you... but time mellows and integrates things as well as naturally aids the filtration process...

i started a batch of rum punch a couple months ago. i pureed pineapple to bring some fruit to the stuff and help dilute the strength of the rum... out of the blender i was able to strain some of the pineapple solids with a very fine kitchen sieve but it was nowhere close to as pulp free as canned pineapple juice... no problem... after a couple months things started to clump. and i strained it through cloth. it was amazing how much easier it was to seperate the solids and they problably contributed their flavor while they were infusing... i would be satisfied serving it as this point but there was still a slight haze so i added some bentonite am going to give it another month...


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Finished making a batch of Vin d'orange based on this post by boston apothacary.

Red wine based - it's a very interesting mix. Needing some ideas for it's use in cocktails - anyone?

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I've made this in the past using a recipe from Aperitif by Georgeanne Brennan. It's worth making a large batch if you like it. It gets better with age. My favorite way to drink it is to drink it anytime you'd serve port.

As far as using it in cocktails; you can substitute it for sweet vermouth or port. In the summer I like mixing it with sparkling water. It lacks the bitterness of vermouth so you might want to give it a few shakes of bitters.

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