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The Wit & Wisdom of Eggs

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This thread is for your contributions regarding eggs: favorite recipes and techniques, quotes, songs, poems, whatever you like. Please do not ask any questions or engage in any discussion on this thread. Questions should go on the Q&A thread. If you wish to have an egg-related discussion with other eGulleters, please start a topic in the regular Cooking forum (link). This thread should contain your contributions only; not replies to other people's contributions, not questions, and not general comments on the course. Thanks!

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<p>The Big List of Hard-Cooked Egg Dishes </p>

<p>The following has been adapted by Jack Lang from various sources, including

La Repertoire de La Cuisine: The major number of named egg dishes are four-layer

affairs:

i2852.jpg A base, mainly

for easy handling. Often this is a tartlet shell, or a croustarde (fried bread)

but can be omitted, or for a plated service something loose, like rice or pasta.

A filling The egg, traditionally soft boiled or poached, or hard-boiled and

halved. The sauce or covering, and possible an additional garnish. A few plated

dishes have a separate contrasting sauce surrounding, or the egg half covered

in two contrasting sauces. I have here translated “Sauce Supreme” to “Cream

sauce”, “Soubise” to Onion Sauce “Sauce Allemande” to brown sauce. I have also

converted “Thick gravy” to demi-glace. </p>

<P><b>Hard-cooked Eggs</b></P>

<TABLE BORDER CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=3 WIDTH=80%>

<TR><TD WIDTH="10%">

<P> <b>Name </b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="15%">

<P> <b>Base </b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%">

<P> <b>Filling </b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="50%">

<P> <b>Sauce/Finish </b></TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Africaine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Toast</TD>

<TD>

<P>Ham, pilau rice, tomato dice</TD>

<TD> </TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Alsacienne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Sauerkraut, ham</TD>

<TD> </TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Americaine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Half tomato</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Americaine (lobster and tomato) Sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Anglaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Toast</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Grated cheese, cayenne; Grill</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Anversoise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Hop shoots </TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Archiduc</P>

</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustadines (fried bread)</P>

<P> </P>

<P> </P>

<P>Tartlet </TD>

<TD>

<P> </P>

<P> </P>

<P> </P>

<P> </P>

<P>Chicken livers</TD>

<TD>

<P>Archiduc (sour cream and paprika) sauce. Created by Paillard for Edward II of Hungary</P>

<P>Hongroise sauce</P>

<P>(chopped onions, paprika, in cream sauce)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Argenteuil</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with asparagus puree</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Armenonville</TD>

<TD>

<P>Brioche</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips and diced carrots</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with sherry</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Aurore</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustadines (fried bread)</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Aurore sauce (tomatoed Béchamel)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Beauregard</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Egg plat (Aubergine) puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Belle Helene</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croquettes of asparagus tips</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Supreme (cream) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Benedictine</P>

<P> </P>

<P> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</P>

<P> </P>

<P>Muffin</TD>

<TD>

<P>Brandade of salt cod</P>

<P> </P>

<P>Slice of tongue</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce, Truffle</P>

<P>Hollandise</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Berceau</TD>

<TD>

<P>Hollowed out baked potato</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chicken mincemeat with cream</TD>

<TD>

<P>Aurore sacue (tomato Bechamel)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Begere</TD>

<TD>

<P>Lamb (minced)</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bignon</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chicken forcemeat, poached</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tarragon veloute, tarragon leaf garnish</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bohemienne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Ham julienne (truffle)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Boieldieu</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlets</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chicken, Foie Gras</TD>

<TD>

<P>Veloute</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bombay</P>

<P>(also Cingalese)</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Curry sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bonvalet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Supreme (cream)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato Bernaise</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bourgigone</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cook egg in red wine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Red wine sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bragance</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato confit</TD>

<TD>

<P>Bernaise sauce; thread of glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bretonne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Onion puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Meat glace, parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Bruxelloise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Braised chicory</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Cambridge</TD>

<TD>

<P>Courgette (zucchini) or marrow, hollowed</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chicken Puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Vientienne Sauce</P>

<P>(White wine, tarragon vinegar, herb butter)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Cardinal</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Dice of lobster</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cardinal sauce (bechamel with lobster butter); Garnish with lobster eggs</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Cendrillopn</TD>

<TD>

<P>Scooped out baked potatoes</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cheese</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay sauce; slice of truffle</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Chantilly</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustarde (Fried bread)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Lentil puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chantilly sauce, cold (Mayo with lemon juice, whipped cream)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Chartres</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tarragon aspic; decorate with tarragon leaves</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Chabaisenne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustarde (Fried bread)</TD>

<TD>

<P>French bean puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce; dice of tomato</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Chasseur</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chicken livers and mushrooms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chasseur sauce: demi-glace with white wine with mushrooms and shallots</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Chatelaine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chestnuts</TD>

<TD>

<P>White creamed Onion sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Chivry</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Herb puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chicken veloute with herbs</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Clamart</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Green pea puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Colbert</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>diced vegetables</TD>

<TD>

<P>Colbert sauce: Chicken glaze with tarragon and butter</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Conde</TD>

<TD>

<P>Toast</TD>

<TD>

<P>Red haricot bean puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Meat aspic, parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Comtesse</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlets</TD>

<TD>

<P>Fresh peas and asparagus tips</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Continental</TD>

<TD>

<P>Foie gras</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Perigourd sauce (truffles0</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Crecy</TD>

<TD>

<P>Brioche</TD>

<TD>

<P>Carrot puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with fancy carrot shapes</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Dalmont</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croutons</TD>

<TD>

<P>Foie Gras</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato Madeira sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Daumont</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mushroom</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crayfish (prawn)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Nantua sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Diane</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Game and mushroom puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Madeira sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Doriac</TD>

<TD>

<P>Slices of tongue</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Dino</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Julienne of chicken and mushroom</TD>

<TD>

<P>Curry sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Duchesse</TD>

<TD>

<P>Duchesse potato</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Thickened gravy</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Flamande</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Brussels sprout puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce; garnish with small or shredded sprout</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Fedora</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Foie Gras and truffles</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Flora</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Half with tomato sauce, half with cream sauce; chopped parsley on the tomato and chopped truffle on the cream side</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Floreal</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade</TD>

<TD>

<P>Green pea puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with chopped parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Florentine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Spinach</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Forestiere</TD>

<TD>

<P>Duchess potato Croustade (fried)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Morels tossed in butter</TD>

<TD>

<P>Demi-glace, morels, parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Georgette</TD>

<TD>

<P>Scooped baked potato</TD>

<TD>

<P>Lobster in Americaine sauce</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (Cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Grand Duc</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades (fried bread)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (Cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Gratin</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades (fried bread)</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (Cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Gribouis</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades (fried bread)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mushrooms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Grilles Diable</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Rolled in melted butter and bread crumbs: deep fried</TD>

<TD>

<P>Diable (hot) Sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Halevy</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Half tomato puree</P>

<P>Half chicken puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Half tomato sauce</P>

<P>Thread of meat glaze</P>

<P>Half cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Heloise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Fried crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Brown sauce with diced chicken, tongue, truffle</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Henri IV</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades (fried bread</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Bearnaise</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Hollandaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades (fried bread)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Salmon</TD>

<TD>

<P>Hollandaise</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Hussard</TD>

<TD>

<P>Half roasted tomato</TD>

<TD>

<P>Chopped onions and ham with meat glaze</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce, cayenne</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Indienne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Rice</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Curry</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Infante</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Truffled mushroom puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (Cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Italienne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Spaghetti</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Laperouse</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Pure of artichoke bottoms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream Sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>La Valliere</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Sorrel Puree with cream</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce, asparagus tips</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Lithuanienne</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mushroom Puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Preigueux (truffle) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Lorette</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade of Dauphin Potatoes</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

<TD>

<P>Demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Madras</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tarlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Rice</TD>

<TD>

<P>Curry</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Maintenon</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mushroom puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Onion Sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Malmaison</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Peas, French beans, asparagus tips, cream</TD>

<TD>

<P>Bearnaise, tarragon and chervil</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Marivaux</TD>

<TD>

<P>Sweet corn with cream</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Marivaux sauce</P>

<P>(veal demi-glace with Mirepoix of vegetables?)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Massena</TD>

<TD>

<P>Artichoke bottoms</P>

</TD>

<TD>

<P>Roundels of marrow</P>

<P>Bernaise sauce</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato sauce</P>

<P>Parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Massenet</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Anna potato</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with french bean puree</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=40>

<P>Mentonnnaise</TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=40><P></P></TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=40>

<P>Leeks, julienne</TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=40>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Metternich</TD>

<TD>

<P>Artichoke bottoms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Julienne of tongue cohered with Veloute</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) Sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=48>

<P>Mignon</TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=48>

<P>Artichoke bottoms</TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=48>

<P>Green peas and shrimps in butter</TD>

<TD WIDTH="25%" HEIGHT=48>

<P>Shrimp sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Milanaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlets</TD>

<TD>

<P>Maccaroni</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Mireille</TD>

<TD>

<P>Saffron rice</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with saffron</P>

<P>Tomato dice and small croutons</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Mirepoix</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Slice of ham`</TD>

<TD>

<P>Madeira sauce with Mirepoix of vegetables</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Mogador</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton of Marquise potato</TD>

<TD>

<P>Slices of tongue and truffle</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with as puree of Foie Gras</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Monsalet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Small Croustades (fried bread)</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomatoed Madeira sauce with julienne of artichoke</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Montglas</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Ham, foie gras and truffle</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato half-glaze</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Montmorency</TD>

<TD>

<P>Toast</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato cream sauce; artichoke bottoms filled with aparagus tp in cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Mornay</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, grilled</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Montrouge</TD>

<TD>

<P>Grilled Mushroom</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with mushroom puree</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Nantua</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crayfish tails (prawns)</TD>

<TD>

<P>Nantua (seafood) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Nicoise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Potato slices browned in butter</TD>

<TD>

<P>French beans, tomato dice</TD>

<TD>

<P>Demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Ninon</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton or tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce, asparagus tips</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Normande</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlets</TD>

<TD>

<P>Poached Oyster</TD>

<TD>

<P>Normande Sauce (fish veloute with oyster juice)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Orleans</P>

<P> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</P>

<P> </P>

<P> </P>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Diced chicken in tomato sauce</P>

<P> </P>

<P>Dice of marrow and truffles with demi-glace</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce blended with pistachio butter</P>

<P>Colbert sauce: chicken glaze with tarragon</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Orsay</TD>

<TD>

<P>Buttered toast</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Chateaubriand sauce: demi glace with shallots, mushrooms, wine, parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Ostendaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Shrimps and diced mushrooms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Nantua (prawn and tomato) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Otero</TD>

<TD>

<P>Scooped baked potato</TD>

<TD>

<P>Shrimps and diced mushrooms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Pacha</TD>

<TD>

<P>Rice</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Paiva</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mushroom puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Parisienne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Half Mornay (chees sauce, half Nantua (seafood) sauce, separated by a line of small noisette potato</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Patti</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Artichoke puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce, sprinkled with chopped yolk of egg</P>

<P>Created by Escoffier in honour of Adelina Patti, the opera singer and Diva, and some say his mistress</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Perigourdine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Slice of truffle (!)</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Perigourd (truffle) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Petit-Duc</TD>

<TD>

<P>Large grilled mushroom</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Chateaubriand sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Piemontaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Minced lamb</TD>

<TD>

<P>Rice a la Piemontaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Polonaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Minced mutton</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Polonaise sauce: breadcrumbs browned in butter with parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Pont-Biquet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Turbot puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Vientienne sauce: white wine with tarragon vinegar, and green (herb) butter</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Portugaise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Roast half tomatoes</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Portugaise sauce: (onions, tomato puree, meat glaze, parsley)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Princesse</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips with butter</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Rachel, aka Sans-Gene</P>

</TD>

<TD>

<P>Artichoke bottoms</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Bordelaise (red wine) sauce; slice of poached marrow, parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Regina</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Diced fillet of sole, shrimps and mushrooms</TD>

<TD>

<P>Normande sauce (fish veloute with oyster juice)</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Reine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Diced chicken</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Roland</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Diced chicken with cream</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with diced chicken and truffle</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Rossini</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Foie Gras</TD>

<TD>

<P>Madeira sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Rougemont</TD>

<TD>

<P>Rice</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, surrounded by tomato sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Royale</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlets</TD>

<TD>

<P>Dice of mushrooms, truffled</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Saint-Hubert</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Game puree</TD>

<TD>

<P>Poivrade (pepper) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Sarde</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato, skinned and scooped</TD>

<TD>

<P>Use raw egg</TD>

<TD>

<P>Egg and breadcrumb; deep fry; demi-glace with parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Savoyarde</TD>

<TD>

<P>Savoyarde potatoes</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Sevigne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Puree of braised lettuce</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Soubise</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Soubise (onion) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Souveraine</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade</TD>

<TD>

<P>Green asaparagus</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Stanley</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Curried Soubise (onion) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Suzette</TD>

<TD>

<P>Scooped baked potato</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Mornay (cheese) sauce, glazed</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Toupinel</TD>

<TD>

<P>Scooped baked potato</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Celery puree</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Tourangelle</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Puree of green beans</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce with green bean butter</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Toussenel</TD>

<TD>

<P>Flat game croquette</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Salmis sauce mixed with chestnut puree</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Tyrolienne</TD>

<TD>

<P>Crouton</TD>

<TD>

<P>Fried onions</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tomato cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Velidoff</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustades</TD>

<TD>

<P>Asparagus tips with cream</TD>

<TD>

<P>Shrimp Sauce, decorate with asparagus tips</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Victoria</TD>

<TD>

<P>Tartlet</TD>

<TD>

<P>Lobster and truffle</TD>

<TD>

<P>Victoria sauce: lobster and truffle</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Viroflay</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade</TD>

<TD>

<P>Spinach in butter</TD>

<TD>

<P>Cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR> <TD>

<P>Wyvern</TD>

<TD>

<P>Croustade</TD>

<TD> </TD>

<TD>

<P>Fish veloute sprinkled with powdered Bombay Duck (dried fish).</P>

<P>Wyvern was the pen name of Colonel Kenny Herbert, who wrote a number of Anglo-Indian cookery books and founded a cookery school. </TD>

</TR>

</TABLE><br>

<b>Deviled Eggs</b>

<TABLE BORDER CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=3 WIDTH=80%>

<TR><TD WIDTH="20%">

<P><b>Name</b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="40%">

<P><b>Additions</b> </TD>

<TD WIDTH="40%" >

<b><P>Finish</b> </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Belloy </TD>

<TD >

<P>Lobster, truffle, mushroom </TD>

<TD >

<P>Mornay sauce, glaze </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Boulanger </TD>

<TD >

<P>Cheese (Mornay sauce) </TD>

<TD >

<P>Parsley </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Chimay </TD>

<TD >

<P>Duxelle, parsley,cream </TD>

<TD >

<P>Mornay sauce, glaze </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Gourmet </TD>

<TD >

<P>Salmon,crayfish(prawn) </TD>

<TD >

<P>Gratin </TD>

</TR>

</TABLE><br>

<b>Sliced Eggs (coins)</b>

<TABLE BORDER CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=3 WIDTH=80%>

<TR><TD WIDTH="20%">

<P><b>Name</b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="40%" >

<P><b>Preparation</b> </TD>

<TD WIDTH="40%" >

<b><P>Finish</b> </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD WIDTH="20%" >

<p>Perchonne</TD>

<TD >

<p>Alternate with slices of potato</TD>

<TD >

<p>Bechamel Sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>Poulette</TD>

<p> <td>Minced mushrooms, Poulette sauce (brown sauce with mushrooms and lemon) </TD>

<p> <td>Parsley </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>A la Tripe </TD>

<p> <td>Mixed with Onion sauce </TD>

<p> <td>Parsley </TD>

</TR>

</TABLE><br>

<b>Diced Eggs</b>

<TABLE BORDER CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=3 WIDTH=80%>

<TR><TD WIDTH="20%" >

<P><b>Name</b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="40%" >

<P><b>Additions</b> </TD>

<TD WIDTH="40%" >

<b><P>Finish</b> </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <TD>Cotellettes d’Oeufs </TD>

<p> <td>Mixed with bechamel and raw yolk; shaped into cutlets; egg and crumb and deep fry </TD>

<p> <td>Tomato sauce </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>Cotelletes Manon </TD>

<p> <td>As above but add chopped ham and onion </TD>

<p> <td>Onion sauce </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>Cromesquis d’Oeufs </TD>

<p> <td>Same as a Cotteletes but add mushrooms and brown sauce; shape into rounds, chill, batter and deep fry </TD>

<p> <td>Tomato sauce </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>Croquettes d’Oeufs </TD>

<p> <td>As above but egg shaped </TD>

<p> <td>Cream sauce </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>Rissoles d’Oeufs </TD>

<p> <td>As Croquettes, but instead of batter, wrap in puff paste and deep fry </TD>

<p> <td>Cream sauce </TD>

</TR>

<TR>

<p> <td>Portugaise </TD>

<p> <td>Stuff into hollowed tomatoes </TD>

<p> <td>Tomato sauce </TD>

</TR>

</TABLE><br>

<p>Some other hard-boiled based egg dishes and notes, for completeness: </p>

Chinese eggs: </br>

Marbled Tea eggs: Crack the hardboiled eggs all over but do not peel.

Make up the following tea mixture: <br>

1 Tbs light Soy <br>

1 Tbs dark soy <br>

¼ tsp salt <br>

2 whole star anise <br>

2 Tbs black tea <br>

2 inch length cinnamon stick <br>

Small piece of dried orange or tangerine peel <br>

3 cups water. <br>

<p>Put in the eggs and bring to the boil. Simmer gently for 3 hours, ensuring the eggs are covered, topping up the pot with water if required. Leave to get cold and steep for 8 hours. Peel to reveal the marbling. Look good if served on fried “seaweed” </p>

<p>Master Sauce eggs: Similar but without the marbling. Quarter to show off the colouring. A master sauce is made up in a casserole, and many things are cooked in it, exchanging flavours with the sauce, which gets better all the time. </p>

<p>Basic Master Sauce: </p>

2 ½ cups water <br>

2 cups light soy <br>

1/3 cup rice wine or sherry <br>

4-5 slices ginger <br>

12 points of star anise <br>

2 oz/50g golden sugar <br>

Optional: 1 scallion chopped <br>

1 tbs cinnamon bark piece <br>

1 thumb size strip of orange or tangerine rind

Bring to the boil. Put in the food and cook 20 mins, then steep for 2 hours.

Filter the sauce, and keep for next time. </p>

<p>Gold coin eggs<br>

Served at Chinese New Year for luck </p>

6 large hard boiled eggs <br>

3 tbs cornstarch (cornflour) <br>

Carefully cut the egg into 5 evenly thick “coins”. <br><br>

Coat each coin in cornflour, pressing first one side, then the other, then rolling the rim in the cornstarch. Shallow fry until golden. Keep warm <br><br>

Sauce <br>

¼ tsp chilli flakes <br>

3 tbs chopped scallion (spring onion) <br>

½ tsp minced ginger <br>

1/4 cup hot water <br>

¼ tsp sugar <br>

2 tsp vinegar <br>

2 tsp soy <br>

1 tsp sesame oil <br>

<p>Sizzle the spring onion (scallion) in a little oil. Add the ginger and the chill, sizzle for 10 secs and the aroma is released. Add the liquids, stir and pour over the coins. Serve hot. </p>

<p>Others: </p>

<p>Chopped hard boiled eggs with mayo, and/or chives, springonions, chopped onion make great sandwich fillers. </p>

<p>Chopped hardboiled eggs are an essential component of chopped liver, kedgeree and many other dishes. Hard-boiled eggs in salt water are traditional Jewish mourning food, and in some traditions are served at the start of the Seder meal, in mourning for the Egyptians and others who lost their lives in the Old Testament Exodus from Egypt, and more generally for all those who have lost their lives in forced migration. Not forgetting the roasted egg that is symbolic of the Pascal Lamb on Ashekenazi Seder plates </p>

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Chinese Tea eggs

Hard boil eggs.

Crack shells of eggs with the back of a spoon or handle of a knife so that pretty crack patterns are made. Be careful that shell does not peel off.

Put eggs back in pot, add fresh water, soy sauce, black tea, salt and star anise.

The amounts are relative to what flavors you like and how strong of a flavor you desire. I typically am making a dozen eggs at a time so I will use about a half cup of soy sauce, a teaspoon of salt, the equivalent of about a fourth cup of loose black tea leaves, and 5-7 star anise. It varies and obviously isnt an exact science.

I then simmer the eggs for a couple of hours and store them in the brine in the fridge. I'll attempt to post a picture or two tonight. The result, when you peel the shell off is a light tan egg with dark brown crackle patterns. The flavor is quite delightful. Some do not like the anise flavor, and that can easily be left out.

i2864.jpg


Edited by nessa (log)

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The Big List of Omelettes

(to accompany the forthcoming omelettes unit of the class)

This contribution is courtesy of Jack Lang (Jackl10):

<P><b>Omelettes</b></P>

<TABLE BORDER CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=3 WIDTH=80%>

<TR><TD WIDTH="10%" >

<P><b>Name</TD>

<TD WIDTH="30%" >

<P><b>Mixed with eggs</b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="30%" >

<P><b>Filling</b></TD>

<TD WIDTH="30%" >

<P><b>Garnish</b></TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Agnes Sorel</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped mushrooms with chicken puree</TD>

<TD >

<P>Roundels of tongue</P>

<P>Thread of meat glaze</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Americaine</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Diced tomato tossed in butter</TD>

<TD >

<P>Rashers of bacon</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Anadalouse</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomatoes and peppers</TD>

<TD >

<P>Fried onions</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Archiduc</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Chicken livers tossed in butter; demi-glace</TD>

<TD >

<P>Archiduc sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Benedictine</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Truffled Brandade</TD>

<TD >

<P>Thread of cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Bonne-Femme</TD>

<TD >

<P>Bacon dice</P>

<P>Chopped mushrooms</P>

<P>Onion softened in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Bouchere</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Poached meat marrow; demi-glace</TD>

<TD >

<P>Slices of marrow; thread of demiglace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Boulonnnaise</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Poache soft fish roe with Maitre d’hotel butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Bourguigonne</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Snails or walnuts</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped parsley</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Bretonne</TD>

<TD >

<P>White of leeks, onions, mushrooms cooked in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Brillat-Savarin</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of woodcock and truffles</TD>

<TD >

<P>Thread of demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Bruxelloise</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Braised chicory with cream</TD>

<TD >

<P>Cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Champignons</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped mushrooms</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped mushrooms</TD>

<TD >

<P>Slices of mushroom</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Chartes</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped tarragon</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Tarragon leaves; demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Chasseur</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Chicken livers and mushrooms in Madeira sauce</TD>

<TD >

<P>Split the omelette to shoe the filling</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Chatelaine</TD>

<TD >

<P> </P>

<P> </P>

<P>Dice of artichoke bottoms and truffle</TD>

<TD >

<P>Cooked chestnuts with meat glaze</P>

<P> </P>

<P> </TD>

<TD >

<P>Onion cream sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Chevreuse</P>

<P> aka Patti</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of artichoke bottoms and truffle and asparagus tips</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Choisy</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Braised lettuce with cream</TD>

<TD >

<P>Thread of cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Clamart</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Peas</TD>

<TD >

<P>Split and fill with peas</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Crecy</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Carrot puree</TD>

<TD >

<P>Slices of carrot, cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Crevettes</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Shrimp tails</TD>

<TD >

<P>Split and fill with shrimps</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Durand</TD>

<TD >

<P>Mushrooms and artichoke bottoms</TD>

<TD >

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Espagnole</TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato onion and pepper dice</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Cook flat, tortilla style</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Fermiere</TD>

<TD >

<P>Ham and chopped parsley</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Flat</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Fine-herbes</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped parsley, chives, tarragon, chervil</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Fleurs de Courge</TD>

<TD >

<P>Shredded zucchini blossoms, parsley softened in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Florentine</TD>

<TD >

<P>Spinach cooked in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Fond d’artichauts</TD>

<TD >

<P>Artichoke bottoms, chopped and tossed in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Forestiere</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Morels and cepes cooked in butter</TD>

<TD >

<P>Demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Grand-mere</TD>

<TD >

<P>Cubes of fried bread, parsley</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Hollandaise</TD>

<TD >

<P>Smoked salmon</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Hollandaise</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Hongroise</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato and onions with paprika</TD>

<TD >

<P>Hongroise sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Jambon</TD>

<TD >

<P>Ham diced</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Lozenges of ham</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Jessica</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Morels and asparagus tips, cream</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chateaubriand sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Jets de Houblon</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Hop shoots, cream</TD>

<TD >

<P>Thread of cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Joinville</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Shrimp tails, mushrooms (truffle)</TD>

<TD >

<P>Shrimp sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Jurassiene</TD>

<TD >

<P>Diced cooked bacon, chopped chives</TD>

<TD >

<P>Shredded sorrel tossed in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Lard (bacon)</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of bacon</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Rashers of fried bacon</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Limousine</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of cooked potatoes and ham </TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Lorraine</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of fried bacon, thin slices of gruyere cheese, chopped chives</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Lyonnaise</TD>

<TD >

<P>Chopped onions softened in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Maria</TD>

<TD >

<P>Lyonnaise plus chopped parsley</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Massena</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Artichoke bottoms tomato sauce</TD>

<TD >

<P>Slices of marrow, meat glace, bearnaise sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Mascotte</TD>

<TD >

<P>Artichoke bottoms, potatoes, truffle</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Mexicaine</TD>

<TD >

<P>Mushrooms, julienne of peppers, </TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato dice</TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato demi-glace</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Mirelle</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomatoes with garlic</TD>

<TD >

<P>Cream sauce with saffron</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Monselet</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Mushrooms, truffle, foie gras</TD>

<TD >

<P>Asparagus tips, mushroom, truffle</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Morilles</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Morels, demi-glace</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Moules</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Mussels in Marniere sauce</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Mousseline</TD>

<TD >

<P>Separate white and yolk, beat whites stiff, mix yolk with salt and cream , mix and cook. Serve immediately</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Mousserons</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Mousseron mushrooms, demi-glace</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Nantua</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Crayfish tails, Nantua sauce</TD>

<TD >

<P>Crayfish, Thread of Nantua sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Nature (palin omellete)</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Normande</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Poached oysters</TD>

<TD >

<P>Normande sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Oiselle</TD>

<TD >

<P>Shredded sorrel tossed in butter</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Ostendaise</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Mussel, mushrooms, truffle, Nantua sauce</TD>

<TD >

<P>Thread of Nantua sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD HEIGHT=46>

<P>Parisienne</TD>

<TD HEIGHT=46>

<P>Dice of potatoes and truffle</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TD >

<P>Parmentier</TD>

<TD >

<P>Sauteed potato</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Parmesan</TD>

<TD >

<P>Grated parmesan</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Paysanne</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of cooked bacon and potatoes cooked in butter, shredded sorrel, pinch of chervil</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Make it flat and thick</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Perigord</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of truffle</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Perigord sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Poites d’Asperges</TD>

<TD >

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Asparagus tips</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Portugaise, aka Tomates</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato paste</TD>

<TD >

<P>Tomato sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Prelats</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Poached soft fish roe, shrimp tail, Normande sauce, crayfish butter</TD>

<TD >

<P>Normande sauce with crayfish butter</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Princesse</TD>

<TD >

<P>Diced chicken, asparagus tips</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Asparagus, truffle, thread of cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Provencale</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Diced tomato with garlic</TD>

<TD >

<P>Provencale sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Reform</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of tongue, truffle, gherkins, egg white, cohered with red currant jelly and poivrade sauce</TD>

<TD >

<P>Poivrade sauce with red currant jelly</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Reine</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Chicken puree</TD>

<TD >

<P>Thread of cream</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Richemont</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Half morels and slices of truffle.</P>

<P>Madeira sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Rognons</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of kidneys, Madeira sauce</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Rossisni</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Foie Gras, truffles</TD>

<TD >

<P>Foie Gras</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Salvator</TD>

<TD >

<P>Julienne of truffles, ham and mushrooms</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Savoyarde</TD>

<TD >

<P>Slices of potato cooked in butter, gruyere cheese</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Must be flat</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Soubise</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Onion puree</TD>

<TD >

<P>Soubise (onion) sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Suissesse</TD>

<TD >

<P>Grated gruyere</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Cheese and grill</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Thon</TD>

<TD >

<P>Tuna in oil</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Anchovy butter</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Truffes</TD>

<TD >

<P>Dice of truffles</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Slices of truffles</P>

<P>Thread of meat glaze</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Turque</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Chicken livers cooked in butter; Madeira sauce</TD>

<TD >

<P>Split and fill cavity with more livers</P>

<P>Madeira sauce</TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD >

<P>Vichy</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Vichy carrots</TD>

<TD > </TD>

</TR>

<TR><TD HEIGHT=84>

<P>Victoria</TD>

<TD > </TD>

<TD >

<P>Lobster and truffles</TD>

<TD HEIGHT=84>

<P>More lobster and truffles, Victoria Sauce</TD>

</TR>

</TABLE>

<P>N.B Truffle flavour can be imparted more economically by using truffle oil.</P>

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Has anyone ever noticed that in the "Humpty Dumpty" rhyme that we learn as kids, it never says he's an egg. Why do we assume that he is? Couldn't he be some other brittle foodstuff? :hmmm:

i2928.jpg


Edited by NickMach007 (log)

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While working on my latest book on slow cooking, I learned from French scientist Herve This about a breakthrough experiment showing that the best way to cook a three-minute egg is to cook it for one hour at a temperature at 140 F or 60 C. "The yolk will remain soft, but the white will firm up." Dr This told me.

The extremely low temperature used for cooking is not dangerous. According to late British scientist,hProfessor Nicholas Kurti, the one hour cooking killed one million salmonellas that had been introduced on purpose.

Using this method. called low temperature long time (LTLT), I've poached very fresh AA eggs at temperature between 145 and 155 F and produced the most delicious "three minute" eggs


“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

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I am not sure how true this is -- but it certainly is interesting

"If you boil an egg while singing all five verses and chorus of the hymn, 'Onward Christian Soldiers.' it will be cooked perfectly when you come to Amen." Letter to the Editor, London's 'Daily Telegraph'

:laugh:


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Has anyone ever noticed that in the "Humpty Dumpty" rhyme that we learn as kids, it never says he's an egg. Why do we assume that he is? Couldn't he be some other brittle foodstuff? :hmmm:

i2928.jpg

By some accounts, not an egg at all, but a weapon:

History: From the East Anglia Tourist Board in England:

"Humpty Dumpty was a powerful cannon during the English Civil War (1642-49).

It was mounted on top of the St Mary's at the Wall Church in Colchester defending the city against siege in the summer of 1648. (Although Colchester was a Parliamentarian stronghold, it had been captured by the Royalists and they held it for 11 weeks.) The church tower was hit by the enemy and the top of the tower was blown off, sending "Humpty" tumbling to the ground. Naturally the King's men* tried to mend him but in vain."

* NB: The "men" would have been infantry, and "horses" the cavalry troops

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eggs on film:

there's that scene from "Angel Heart" where Robert DeNiro (cast loosely as Satan) is eating a hard-boiled egg. creepy. :blink:

i'm guessing that in this context, the egg symbolizes the beginning of things...

and of course, in "Fargo", Frances McDormand and her husband's character have at least 2 eggs apiece every morning, even though she has morning sickness. :biggrin:


Edited by gus_tatory (log)

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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eggs in the occult

One of my favorite images is the Orphic Egg -- I have it has a piece of jewelry and am in the process of weaving sterling silver as the snake around an ostrich egg to have the image as a three-dimensional sculpture:

i2929.jpg

From Bryant's An Analysis of Ancient Mythology

The ancient symbol of the Orphic Mysteries was the serpent-entwined egg, which signified Cosmos as encircled by the fiery Creative Spirit. The egg also represents the soul of the philosopher; the serpent, the Mysteries. At the time of initiation the shell is broken and man emerges from the embryonic state of physical existence wherein he had remained through the fetal period of philosophic regeneration. MPH

edited to add explanation of symbol.


Edited by Carolyn Tillie (log)

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By some accounts, not an egg at all, but a weapon:
History: From the East Anglia Tourist Board in England:

"Humpty Dumpty was a powerful cannon during the English Civil War (1642-49).

It was mounted on top of the St Mary's at the Wall Church in Colchester defending the city against siege in the summer of 1648. (Although Colchester was a Parliamentarian stronghold, it had been captured by the Royalists and they held it for 11 weeks.) The church tower was hit by the enemy and the top of the tower was blown off, sending "Humpty" tumbling to the ground. Naturally the King's men* tried to mend him but in vain."

* NB: The "men" would have been infantry, and "horses" the cavalry troops

Wow! That certainly would change a few children's books. Maybe it is better if we just pretend he's an egg. My lips are sealed. Thanks for the info. :cool:

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eggs on film:

there's that scene from "Angel Heart" where Robert DeNiro (cast loosely as Satan) is eating a hard-boiled egg. creepy. :blink:

i'm guessing that in this context, the egg symbolizes the beginning of things...

and of course, in "Fargo", Frances McDormand and her husband's character have at least 2 eggs apiece every morning, even though she has morning sickness. :biggrin:

The all-time classic hard-boiled egg film sequence has to be the egg-eating contest from Cool Hand Luke

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Chinese Tea eggs

Hard boil eggs.

Crack shells of eggs with the back of a spoon or handle of a knife so that pretty crack patterns are made. Be careful that shell does not peel off.

Put eggs back in pot, add fresh water, soy sauce, black tea, salt and star anise.

The amounts are relative to what flavors you like and how strong of a flavor you desire. I typically am making a dozen eggs at a time so I will use about a half cup of soy sauce, a teaspoon of salt, the equivalent of about a fourth cup of loose black tea leaves, and 5-7 star anise. It varies and obviously isnt an exact science.

I then simmer the eggs for a couple of hours and store them in the brine in the fridge. I'll attempt to post a picture or two tonight. The result, when you peel the shell off is a light tan egg with dark brown crackle patterns. The flavor is quite delightful. Some do not like the anise flavor, and that can easily be left out.

i2864.jpg

Very cool. What's the texture like?

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I don't find the texture to be any different than a regular hard boiled egg, though sometimes the yolks might be a little softer? However maybe I'm so enamored of the flavor that I'm not noticing. I'm addicted to these yummy little portable snacks. I am going to try a new thing this week, hard boil them, crack them, then simmer in the crock pot in the brine overnight. Be careful when cracking the shell so that you don't also crack the white. When that happens, the brine gets in and makes the yolk a tad soupy. However, you can take pin and poke a hole or two into the egg so that the brine penetrates further. My Chinese friend does that. I don't usualy because I don't want to risk my precious yolk.

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The following recipe was found among the manuscripts left by Vladimir Nabokov, handwritten by him in pencil on a single sheet of paper [N.B. this is not the method I use]:

Eggs à la Nabocoque

Boil water in a saucepan (bubbles mean it is boiling!). Take two eggs (for one person) out of the refrigerator. Hold them under the hot tap water to make them ready for what awaits them.

Place each in a pan, one after the other, and let them slip soundlessly into the (boiling) water. Consult your wristwatch. Stand over them with a spoon preventing them (they are apt to roll) from knocking against the damned side of the pan.

If, however, an egg cracks in the water (now bubbling like mad) and starts to disgorge a cloud of white stuff like a medium in an oldfashioned seance, fish it out and throw it away. Take another and be more careful.

After 200 seconds have passed, or, say, 240 (taking interruptions into account), start scooping the eggs out. Place them, round end up, in two egg cups. With a small spoon tap-tap in a circle and then pry open the lid of the shell. Have some salt and buttered bread (white) ready. Eat.

V.N.

November 18, 1972

[A notation in ink was made at the top:]

"Maxime de la Falaise McKendry

for a cooking book"

[And a later notation under it:]

"Never acknowledged by Maxime"

Cheers,

Squeat

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Personally I like to add the vinegar as much for the taste as for the coagulating properties, I thing it gives an almost metallic tang to the whites, which I like (Not sure if anyone else would agree).

Think it comes from my Mother always adding quite a lot of vinegar. Malt vinegar actually. They just don't taste right without it too me!

On a side note, am I the only one who sometimes looks at something they have made, and decided how much better it would be with an egg on top? Something about the yolk which can help lubricate, and bind the flavours together.

I gave up using vinegar in my eggs after tasting it both ways. The vinegar'd eggs tasted like the inside of a chemlab, which is not something I want to eat from a spoon at breakfast.

I find, too, that a little vortex tends to keep the eggs from sticking to the pan by allowing them to cook on the surface before settling in.

There are so many sauced things that beg for a poached egg.

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Nothing beats the Egg Lady in John Waters' Pink Flamingos. Nothing.

Egg Lady

scroll down about halfway. she's the one in the playpen, for those of you who have been deprived of this delightful treat.

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Thank you Andy Lynes and Jack Lang for the egg lists, especially the hard-cooked eggs list since I'm not much for omelettes. I find myself eating some variation of the 4-layer hard-cooked egg dish more often because it's the one of the easiest dishes to put together for one person. It's wonderful to see so many options on one page.

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After reading Steven's excellent unit on omelettes, I thought I would demonstrate a slightly differnet classic technique. Now, I actually prefer Steven's JC-influenced "jerk and pull" technique, but those who prefer a drier omelette without browning the eggs might prefer to give this one a try.

This afternoon I decided to make some caramelized shallot omelettes. I beat the eggs with a little water, salt and white pepper.

i3042.jpg

I use a French steel omelette pan. It is technically a "three egg omelette pan," but I find that this means three medium eggs or two extra large eggs. I used two extra large.

i3029.jpg

To use a French steel pan , you heat it up on the stove and pour in a little oil.

i3030.jpg

Then take the pan off the heat and wipe it out out completely.

i3031.jpg

A little butter into a lukewarm pan over medium high heat.

i3032.jpg

When the butter is completely melted and the foaming has subsided, the pan is ready.

i3033.jpg

In go the eggs.

i3034.jpg

Here is where the technique differs. At this point the eggs are rapidly scrambled into small curds with the tines of a fork held parallel to the surface of the pan until around 3/4 done.

i3035.jpg

On go the shallots.

i3036.jpg

Reverse the grip to a palm-up, thumb-towards-the-body grip, tilt the pan and bang on the handle. This causes the eggs to slide towards the away lip of the pan, which is steeply curved in a classic omelette pan.

i3037.jpg

As the eggs slide up the curve of the pan, the far side of the omelette flops back over onto the eggs.

i3038.jpg

Turn out onto a warm plate.

i3039.jpg

The finished omelette. As you can see, the curds are apparent and the exterior is not as smooth as the omelettes prepared by the other method. Ordinarily the exterior would be more uniform, but I let the curds set up a little too much while taking the pictures. Omelette making is a speed-cooking procedure.

i3040.jpg

Here it is dressed with a little Red Devil hot sauce. You can see that the interior is nicely dry (the liquid on the plate is from the hot sauce -- there was no oozing from the omelette).

i3041.jpg


--

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The initial posts to this thread have been mighty intimidating. Tough acts to follow.

Oh, well.

I have something to say about pancakes.

Eggs play a supporting role in pancakes. Until recently, most of my experience with pancakes at home came courtesy of a box of Bisquick. But just the other day, I wanted to make some pancakes for my daughter and me, and I came upon a recipe for fluffy pancakes in Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything.

This recipe contains the usual stuff: milk, flour, sugar, a dash of salt, and eggs. But you separate the eggs. And you whip the whites into stiff (but still wet) peaks. (This takes no time if you just get over it and use your stand mixer at 8:00 in the morning. Don't worry about messing up the kitchen-- you've got all day to make it even dirtier and clean it all back up.) Then you gently fold the whites into the batter, and make silver dollar pancakes that are as light as a feather, and as high as biscuits. Delicious.

Maybe everybody knew about this already? I didn't. And if you've never tried it either, you ought to.

Eggs are such a miracle food.


"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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eggs on film:

there's that scene from "Angel Heart" where Robert DeNiro (cast loosely as Satan) is eating a hard-boiled egg. creepy. :blink:

i'm guessing that in this context, the egg symbolizes the beginning of things...

and of course, in "Fargo", Frances McDormand and her husband's character have at least 2 eggs apiece every morning, even though she has morning sickness. :biggrin:

There is an amazing scene in Tampopo where a man and a woman pass a yolk back and froth from one mouth to another...

Finally the yolk breaks and drips down the woman's mouth as she orgasms.

Soft porn, totally soft porn. Gives a whole new light to food toys and sex!

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This might set a new record for dorkiness. I find that a "pasta fork" comes in very handy for handling individual eggs.

i3616.jpg

-michael


"Tis no man. Tis a remorseless eating machine."

-Captain McAllister of The Frying Dutchmen, on Homer Simpson

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I'll leave out the fact that I didn't see the "Denver omelette" in the list.

May I suggest an additional omelette as prepared here.

FYI, the "onion tops" in the recipe are probably better known as scallions.


Screw it. It's a Butterball.

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