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Riedel "O" Series


Chad
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Dunno if y'all caught this or not, but Riedel has just introduced a new line of anti-stemware, the new "O Collection" -- the Vinum series without the stems.

In January, the company introduced the O collection, a series of six wineglasses based on the shapes of the popular Vinum collection -- without the stem. . . .

Although dubbed a "tumbler," the O glasses have a unique trait: When tipped over, they wobble back into an upright position, which could come in handy on rougher terrains.

Strange but true.

Chad

Chad Ward

An Edge in the Kitchen

William Morrow Cookbooks

www.chadwrites.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

A brilliant move though far from being my cup of tea.

Looks like Jr. is heading his father's way in terms of rebellion against tradition.

I might keep those in mind when I buy my first limousine...

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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Riedel O Collection available on Amazon.com:

Currently they are all approximately 30% off list price.

B00018HQA8.01.THUMBZZZ.jpg Cabernet/Merlot Wine Tumblers, Set of 2, $17.99
B00018HQBC.01.THUMBZZZ.jpg Syrah/Shiraz Wine Tumblers, Set of 2, $17.99
B00018HQB2.01.THUMBZZZ.jpg Sauvignon Blanc/Riesling Wine Tumblers, Set of 2, $13.99
B00018HQAS.01.THUMBZZZ.jpg Pinot Noir/Nebbiolo Wine Tumblers, Set of 2, $17.99
B00018HSHE.01.THUMBZZZ.jpg Chardonnay Wine Tumblers, Set of 2, $17.99
B00018HQAI.01.THUMBZZZ.jpg Chardonnay/Viognier Wine Tumblers, Set of 2, $13.99

Thanks for supporting eGullet.com by making purchases via these links!

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as reported by the New York Times here.

"If you watch the way people drink wine, they usually hold the glass by the bowl, not the stem," Mr. Riedel said.

i recall Tabla, in NYC, serving wine in glasses like these about 5 years ago when it first opened. after much protest, and probably too many explanations to purists, they switched to traditional glasses.

personally, i don't like the stemless glasses because i end up getting finger prints all over the bowl.

Edited by tommy (log)
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  • 2 years later...

I have tried using the Riedel "O" glass for a period of time now and made sure what I am going to say is not affected by the first shock at the sight of their stemless shape.

Take a good quality Cabernet and try tasting the wine from a Riedel Bordeaux Vinum glass. Try theBordeaux "o" afterwards.

The wine in the "o" glass is much flatter on the nose while being less balanced in the mouth causing the wine to loose its structure and spine.

The "o" fails to function in the same manner any other Riedel glass series does and I find them practically uncofortable for every day use.

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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I pretty much anti-"O" myself but we do keep a set of them in our studio for guests. It's a production environment so we don't want anything with the propensity for getting knocked over near sensitive equipment. That said, isn't the shape of the bowl essentially the same between the "Vinum" and "O" Bordeaux glasses . . . other than the flat bottom? I haven't done a side by side comparison, but that would definitely be interesting.

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

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  ..., isn't the shape of the bowl essentially the same between the "Vinum" and "O" Bordeaux glasses . . . other than the flat bottom?  I haven't done a side by side comparison, but that would definitely be interesting.

They are almost the same shape. The problem begins with the need to tilt the head in dif. angels resulting in the wine being smelled or poured in dif. ereas.

Another issue to look into is the flat botoom of the "o" glass as opposed to the natural dent found in the Vinum or other series.

My experience goes:

The Nose:

Vinum: med. to full bodied rich nose with a beautiful fruity texture mingling with

sweet vanilla and gradually shifting into subtle spice and mild oak aroma.

"O" : fruit tends to hide under the now dominant sweet vanilla ending with a rather harsh oaky character, further tilting allows more fruit to surface but that is of an alcoholic character. The oak and wine seem seperate in the "O" and lack the consistancy teh Vinum portrayed.

Taste:

Vinum: smooth fruity feel on the entrance with complimenting spicy tannins and a balanced mildly seasoned finish.

"O" : somehow emptier in the mouth with the fruits disappearing when confrunted with the now harsh and unbalanced tannins. green harsh tannins seem to dominate the finish.

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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I just received a whole set of these from my sister's as an engagement gift and while I felt guilty, I returned almost all of them. I just do not like drinking wines from these, for all of the reasons mentiond in this thread. I did save a few of them to drink scotch from though.

I do like stemless, heavy bottomed bistro glasses for inexpensive, casual wine drinking and picnics, but I'll stick to my Reidel's with stems for everything else.

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For years Riedel and others taught us that holding a wine glass by the bowl instead of the stem (a) warmed the wine unnecessarily and (b) left nasty fingerprints on clean bowls. Either someone lied to us then or they are lying to us now.

The joke making the rounds in some circles is that Riedel is about to come out with a new offering - stems and epoxy glue!

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The Riedel "O" glassware is marketed towards midlevel restaurants and bars who don't want the expense of the "Vinum" line. The "O" is dirt cheap, and it doesn't have a stem to break.

Edited by BigboyDan (log)
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Here's someting I've posted elsewhere in the past.

Many of you will remember from a few years ago a line of ultra-hip and allegedly ultra-revealing glasses, "Les Impitoyables." A few of us wine geeks were in copacetic spirits and it hit me -- "Les Impossibles." (Must be pronounced French, like "leh-zam-poss-EEbl' .") Wine glasses in the shape of Klein bottles (a Klein bottle has a continuous surface, inside and outside merge -- can't hold water). More form than function, it's true. But surely they could fetch a high price anyway with skilled marketing. They're also of a kin with one modern French cookbook I read with ultimate chapter "Recettes Impossibles," older recipes demanding illegal or extinct ingredients, therefore you can't possibly make them.

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Absolutely no problems with the 'O' series. We use them for BBQ's and other events where they are less likely to tip over from exuberant party goers. The Bacarrat is for more sedate events.

In terms of taste differential, I will bet GOOD MONEY that a properly conducted blind tasting will discern NO difference between the 'O' series and other Riedel stemware. Of course a blind test will be hard to do since I can't figure out a way to keep the taster from discerning glass shape! In fact all the Riedel hype for glass shape is some of the best marketing BS I have ever come across. -Dick

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Absolutely no problems with the 'O' series. We use them for BBQ's and other events where they are less likely to tip over from exuberant party goers. The Bacarrat is for more sedate events.

In terms of taste differential, I will bet GOOD MONEY that a properly conducted blind tasting will discern NO difference between the 'O' series and other Riedel stemware. Of course a blind test will be hard to do since I can't figure out a way to keep the taster from discerning glass shape! In fact all the Riedel hype for glass shape is some of the best marketing BS I have ever come across. -Dick

Hi Dick,

I will let you keep your money ...for now.

Try to do what I did, compare the Vinum to the "O" and see for yourself. If comfort is the issue, perhaps a new evolutionary idea of Wine Mugs might arise. After all the Romans did beat us to it a couple of thousands years ago followed by the French farmer [ tarditional French farmers never wash their wine mugs ].

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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We have two dozen "O''s at home and use them for casual tastings and fun dinners with friends. They are low cost, easy to store, and you can throw them in the dishwasher.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Vancouver

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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I don't particularly care for them for some of the reasons cited above, but a guy at a local shop persuaded me when he mentioned that he got some to take to outdoor musical concerts in the park. And they were on sale for $6.50 each. That said, my understanding is that they are not the Vinum without a stem, but rather the less expensive Overture (non-leaded) without a stem. Am I mistaken?

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For years Riedel and others taught us that holding a wine glass by the bowl instead of the stem (a) warmed the wine unnecessarily and (b) left nasty fingerprints on clean bowls.  Either someone lied to us then or they are lying to us now. 

For a BBQ they're fine but I just don't like stemless wine glasses for the above reason.

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I don't particularly care for them for some of the reasons cited above, but a guy at a local shop persuaded me when he mentioned that he got some to take to outdoor musical concerts in the park. And they were on sale for $6.50 each. That said, my understanding is that they are not the Vinum without a stem, but rather the less expensive Overture (non-leaded) without a stem. Am I mistaken?

I found the "O" much more of the Vinum line than anything else. The "O" glass is too thin, elegant and gentle to belong to either the Overture, Restaurant or the Wine line, which leaves us with the "Vinum"

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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