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"Zuni Cafe" Cookbook by Judy Rogers


Mottmott
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I have the kitchen to myself for two whole days and thought I'd try a couple recipes from it. What have you tried besides the chicken? I'm leaning towards the Chard/Onion Panade and the Spicy Squid Stew with Roasted Peppers. But it all looks sooo good that I'm open to other suggestions.

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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First a disclaimer that I haven't made this yet--but along seafood lines, I'm also intrigued by the Salt Cod Chowder wiht Fennel, Saffron, Onions and Cracker Bread.

Have to admit, I'm not sure what cracker bread is but maybe could substitute with thin, toasted bread... It sounds like a nice wintry strew and could be a gourmet and rustic homage to the NE Patriots today if you live in that part of the woods...

A wonderful ending I have made are the chocolate pots de creme---especially if you have access to a good chocolate. As she suggests, it's best not to overcook these. I'm not a huge *chocolate-all-the-time* fanatic, but enjoy small desserts with a rich chocolate flavor. These fit the bill! I've had them slightly warm out of the oven and after being chilled, with a thin blanket of heavy cream on top and also with whipped cream...schlag. :smile:

Hope you have a fun day of cooking, tasting and eating!

edited to add: Please let us know what you end up trying! :smile:

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Wow, I'm surprised this cookbook is popular. I recieved it as a gift, went through it and discarded as useless both in my restaurant and at home. Perhaps I'll give it another look-see. Let me know how your recipes turn out.

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Wow, I'm surprised this cookbook is popular. I recieved it as a gift, went through it and discarded as useless both in my restaurant and at home. Perhaps I'll give it another look-see. Let me know how your recipes turn out.

Curious why didn't you like it. Was it the ingredients, the recipes, or the type of food? Else?

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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My first venture in the Zune Cafe Ckbk? Spicy Squid Stew with Red Wine and Roasted Peppers. I made it a little less spicy than it called for because I can't eat food that's too hot.

Nevertheless, everyone liked it - even the 4 year old who wants his mother to make it for him, too. She's in for a surprise if she tries. Because the dish uses the ink in the sauce, I bought three pounds of whole squid and had to clean and cut them up. Not fast.

I also liked it, but I'm not sure I liked it quite as much as to justify the amount of work it took to make it. If I were to do it again, I think I might stuff the squid rather than cut them up into rings. I'll also check around to see if I can find the ink and save myself the cleaning process.

Edited: Thought I should edit this to incorporate a change or two I made: I added some orange juice as well as the zest and I thought it was a tad acidic (might have been that brand of tomatoes) and so added a spoonful of honey. Also, I didn't have any red wine around and used some white instead.

Edited by Mottmott (log)

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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the roasted artichokes with onions is very good, the way the recipe is written drove me crazy, no i did not massage the oil into the artichokes and inspite of this, the dish was well received.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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My first venture in the Zune Cafe Ckbk? Spicy Squid Stew with Red Wine and Roasted Peppers. I made it a little less spicy than it called for because I can't eat food that's too hot.

Thanks for telling us about the squid stew. After reading your post I glanced at the recipe and saw what you meant about reserving the ink sacs, etc. I should learn how to do that sometime! but I might try it first w/o the ink and using cleaned squid...

Glad you started this thread; it will be fun to check out people's comments and I think it will spur me to start cooking through the book more. :smile:

Besides the pots de creme, I've made the "Onion Soup with Tomato & a Poached Egg". It was quick, easy and hit the spot.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I second the chicken and figs. I don't get many fresh figs in my part of the U.S., but that recipe was worth the sacrifice. Another recipe I liked is the simple lentil soup with red peppers -- quick yet hearty weeknight supper.

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Braised Bacon-The single greatest bacon dish I have ever had. I challenge anyone not to continually pick at it right from the pot. While delicious in its own right, it makes so many other dishes taste better (salmon with lentils, carbonara, amitriciana, soup, etc.) Make sure not to dump the stock that is produced.

Onion Jam or compote or whatever they call it in the book- now a staple in my house. Double or triple the recipe and keep it in the fridge. Throw it on some good crusty bread or serve it with the chicken liver recipe in the book. Also great with cheese, believe it or not.

Just about any fish dish-mostly simple and delicious.

So many of the salads

Roasted potatoes

Mashed potatoes

Of course the roast chicken

Another bonus are all of the leftover ideas: panades, breakfast dishes etc.

Too many others that I just can't think of right now.

"These pretzels are making me thirsty." --Kramer

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I second the Boiled Kale, all variations, as well as the the braised chicken & figs. Both unexpected and delicious. I've also make the fried eggs in breadcrumbs - the perfect lunch with a green salad.

Tonight, we're making the fuyu persimmons and braesola, and I expect it will be good.

Enjoy the book; we love it.

Edit: Oh, man! The italian sausage is great too. Not for everyone, as you have to grind the meat, stuff it, etc. - but fantastic nonetheless. Perfect balance, very savory.

Edited by ianeccleston (log)
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My copy is currently on loan (to a trustworthy friend) but I love this cookbook.

The Mock Porchetta is fab, and I make it for a meal, but more, for the leftovers in hash. Sublime. I've also made the savory cream puff with baon and argula appetizer which was an unbelievable hit (should have tripped recipe).

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Melkor and I are making Zuni's roast chicken recipe tonight - any suggestions/refinements?

(We're doing a food blog this week.)

Precede with bombay sapphire martini, oysters and caesar salad, follow with espresso granita parfait??? :raz:

Sorry for the silly joke; I was just projecting the rest of my 'order' if I could be up at Zuni tonight for dinner!!

I haven't tried it yet at home; so I can't help. Look forward to this on your foodblog though!

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I have tried the pickled onions (Carol'd Pickled Onions). They were fantastic. I made them to stuff the gougeres (with bacon and arugula) but ended up eating them by the forkful.

Ditto here. The gougeres were a big hit, too.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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The short ribs in Chimay Ale were only OK - the ale gave it lots of caramel flavours, but for my money they weren't as interesting or complex as those produced by a good red wine (e.g. from Cahors).

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

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"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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I forgot to mention that the pork chops are outstanding. She has you brine them for 2-4 days with a mixture of seasonings (bay leaves, hot pepper, juniper berries). The end product is an amazingly juicy and tender chop with the flavor of the seasoning suffused entirely throughout.

I can now also recommend the fuyu persimmon & braesola - although the persimmons are a bit sweet for the mix - you might want cut down on the amount and want to have them as an accent only.

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Yesterday I made the panade with onions, chard, and Fontina Val d'Aosta. It turned out very well. It suggested two ways of baking it. I made the slow version with the chicken stock to the brim, cooking it in a slow oven for longer. It has a soft unctuous quality. It would also be perfect as a side dish with fowl or a pork roast. If I make it as a stand alone dish again, however, I think I'll use less liquid and bake it for a shorter time at the higher temperature to make a crisper, dryer version.

Also, the recipe was ambiguous in that it called for 1 lb green chard, ribs removed, but wasn't clear whether it was 1 lb of the leafy part only. I compromised, using a little more than a pound (total weight). Next time, I'd use a bit more chard. Also, I caramelized an extra 1/2 - 1 lb onions which I think the dish needed and would do again.

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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I made the Roast Chicken last night for the first time. It was so good I'm daydreaming about it now. Other than having to plan ahead by a day or two, it's much simpler than the number of pages devoted to the recipe would make you believe.

I don't know if I'll bother trying another roast chicken recipe now.

I didn't do the bread salad part, no leftover bread.

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