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Cooking Dried Beans


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We haven't had the Giant white limas for years, so they might have been a little old. We have large white limas, which are not as sweet and really taste more what you expect from a lima. They have a more vegetable flavor, for better or worse. I love them with parma cheese.

I'm so glad the Reboseros are getting such a nice reception! A woman in her 60s was growing them single-handedly for us in Hidalgo but because they were so popular, her grandson, who was on his way to the states illegally, has decided to stay and work with his grandmother instead. I never dreamed that my selfish need to consume could make a real difference, but it did!

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We haven't had the Giant white limas for years, so they might have been a little old. We have large white limas, which are not as sweet and really taste more what you expect from a lima. They have a more vegetable flavor, for better or worse. I love them with parma cheese.

I'm so glad the Reboseros are getting such a nice reception! A woman in her 60s was growing them single-handedly for us in Hidalgo but because they were so popular, her grandson, who was on his way to the states illegally, has decided to stay and work with his grandmother instead. I never dreamed that my selfish need to consume could make a real difference, but it did!

Well, maybe what I had was just the large white limas, and not giant white limas.

I mean, they were pretty big.

And pretty white.

But maybe not giant.

I haven't had them that long so if you haven't had the giant white limas "for years," that couldn't be what we ate.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I have yet to cook any of the beans that have not been superior to beans from other vendors and as some are unavailable anywhere else, he will continue to supply mine.

I am happy to know of RG, but wonder if you have tried Purcell Mountain? For selection and quality,I have always been extremely pleased. Do you know them? Is RG better quality (if not with the huge selection)as PM?

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Whatever can't be had from RG I order from Purcell Mountain Farms. Purcell is my go-to source for dark red kidney beans--they are excellent quality, seem very fresh. They used to regularly stock the rattlesnake beans that I adore, but have been out of them for over a year now. The only place I've found that still carries rattlers is Urban Herbs; not as fresh as RG or Purcell beans, but better than no rattlers at all. If anyone knows another source for rattlesnake beans, don't keep it a secret, please. I've pestered RG about them several times, but no luck! Are they an endangered species, Steve? Get the Hidalgo granny interested in saving them too. Meanwhile tell her the Reboseros are delicious, and to keep 'em coming.

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Whatever can't be had from RG I order from Purcell Mountain Farms. Purcell is my go-to source for dark red kidney beans--they are excellent quality, seem very fresh. They used to regularly stock the rattlesnake beans that I adore, but have been out of them for over a year now. The only place I've found that still carries rattlers is Urban Herbs; not as fresh as RG or Purcell beans, but better than no rattlers at all. If anyone knows another source for rattlesnake beans, don't keep it a secret, please. I've pestered RG about them several times, but no luck! Are they an endangered species, Steve? Get the Hidalgo granny interested in saving them too. Meanwhile tell her the Reboseros are delicious, and to keep 'em coming.

Marx foods in Washington state sells rattlesnake beans. They are out of stock right now, waiting for the new crop to come in.

Here's the link.

The only legume I have purchased from them are the fermented black beans. I have also purchased their dried wild mushrooms. Expensive but the quality is extraordinary. I also purchased camelina seeds to add yet another omega-3 fatty acid/antioxidant to my diet.

I have purchased from Purcell, and from Barry Farm. I buy from RG whenever possible because I want to support these small traditional native farmers.

I used to buy beans from Indian Harvest until I got a bad batch.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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We haven't had the Giant white limas for years, so they might have been a little old. We have large white limas, which are not as sweet and really taste more what you expect from a lima. They have a more vegetable flavor, for better or worse. I love them with parma cheese.

I'm so glad the Reboseros are getting such a nice reception! A woman in her 60s was growing them single-handedly for us in Hidalgo but because they were so popular, her grandson, who was on his way to the states illegally, has decided to stay and work with his grandmother instead. I never dreamed that my selfish need to consume could make a real difference, but it did!

Well, maybe what I had was just the large white limas, and not giant white limas.

I mean, they were pretty big.

And pretty white.

But maybe not giant.

I haven't had them that long so if you haven't had the giant white limas "for years," that couldn't be what we ate.

Can't get the lima conundrum out of my mind.

I did get that bag out of the freezer, so I suppose it's possible it's been in there "for years" although I didn't think so.

The beans were about one inch long. Does that make them "giant" or simply large?

And they were so good. I'd even say fabulous. I had big plans to order more.

If 1" long does make them giant and you don't have any more right now, when, if ever, might you get more?

And if they're simply large and not giant, do you have any more large white limas I can order?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Thanx, I'll watch for rattlers on the Marx Foods site. Surprisingly Marx has never come up on any search I've made for dried beans.

I have never seen them on a Google search either. One of my basenji friends, who lives in Seattle gave me their email address when I complained about the quality of some dried wild mushrooms I had purchased.

She said to inquire about their products and they sent me an email with their URL.

I also ordered the en croute duck paté to take to a party when I didn't have time to make up something. (I took three of them (there are 8 in the order) and they were gone almost instantly - I didn't even get a taste at the party.) :sad:

I later thawed one for brunch when a couple of friends were visiting, they raved about it and to me it was better than any I have made and mine are pretty good! :wub:

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Jaymes, I'm sure they were Large Limas. They're pretty big and we grow them. The Giants were obscenely big and would burst easily because the skins couldn't hold the bean inside. They were also sweet and a little potatoey, unlike the large limas which are really clearly a lima. They are wonderful! We had imported the giants (I think they needed more daylight hours than we can provide) and we grow the large limas here in California.

Re Rattlesnakes, we've never had enough seed to grow them and they are lovely, but very similar to pintos and it seemed other people were growing them, so there just didn't seem a need. Now it seems that whoever was growing them hopefully just had a bad year, but possibly they lost distributorship. Which brings me to another point: I'm not saying it's better or worse but we grow all of our beans in California except for the beans in the Rancho Gordo-Xoxoc Project, which are grown in Mexico by small, indigenous farmers*. Some places are buying and distributing beans. This doesn't mean they aren't serious, it's just a different business. But it might explain why all of a sudden everyone has rattlesnakes and then all at once everyone is out of them.

(* We've been playing around with Peru imports, as the Giant Lima, but nothing serious yet)

Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

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"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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  • 1 year later...

I'm bumping this topic up to let folks know that Purcell Mountain Farms now has Rattlesnake Beans, new crop in stock.

They don't usually last long so now is the time. I've ordered five pounds and am thinking of getting more as I use them for baked beans.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Yes, they got them in a couple of months ago. I'm about to place another order as well, along with dark red kidney beans. I use rattlers for everything I used to use pinto beans. They take a little longer to cook, but hold their shape better and have a richer flavor. Pintos might be the best if you were making refried beans, though.

In case you haven't tried them, I think Purcell carries the best kidney beans I've ever tasted. I've had the organic and the non-organic, and both are excellent. I'm pretty sure I couldn't tell them apart in a side-by-side tasting, but if organic matters to you and you are willing to pay a little more per pound, Purcell always has them.

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  • 2 years later...

for a while, i was afraid that my tombstone would read "did not soak beans". here's what i believe about beans:

Russ I absolutely agree with you. I think everything you state in your post is right.

I just wanna add another item to your list: Beans are more tasty when you cook them mixed with vegetables and condiments.

During the cooking process the beans double their size. That´s because they absorb a lot water.

If we cook them mixed with the other components of the recipe they absorb all the flavors we have choosen, so they integrate better to our dish.

In some receipes the beans seem to be like a flavor separated from the other components. That´s because they were soaked or boiled just in plain water so, when we cook them they have no capability of absorbing the other flavors.

Some people use to soak them with some condiments and salt, but as you say, the cold cooking is not as good as the hot one.

Many of the review articles are taken from this online casino site.

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I'm bumping this topic up to let folks know that Purcell Mountain Farms now has Rattlesnake Beans, new crop in stock.They don't usually last long so now is the time. I've ordered five pounds and am thinking of getting more as I use them for baked beans.

Thanks for the heads up! Rattlers are my favorite.

I posted that two years ago.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I'm bumping this topic up to let folks know that Purcell Mountain Farms now has Rattlesnake Beans, new crop in stock.They don't usually last long so now is the time. I've ordered five pounds and am thinking of getting more as I use them for baked beans.

Thanks for the heads up! Rattlers are my favorite.

I posted that two years ago.

Too funny! I just saw November... I needed more anyway.

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Very timely that this thread should get bumped up! For the last couple days I've been preparing for a pot of beans, black beans in this case. Soaked the beans, rendered the lard, that sort of thing.

I started with a pound of beans. For the lard I took a couple pounds of bacon ends and cooked them in water as andiesenji suggested. I fished out and reserved the meaty bacon pieces, but did not crisp them right away. After the water cooked down I added the remaining fat and stuff to a canning jar with baking soda and did the MC technique on them: 4 hours in the pressure cooker to render. Beautiful clear lard. Yum.

I chopped and sauteed an onion and some garlic in lard, in the pressure cooker bottom, along with a portion of the reserved bacon from above. I added two bay leaves, a sprig of rosemary from the small tree sized bush that spends the winter in my dining room, and the pound of well soaked beans, drained of soaking liquid. I added four cups of fresh water. I cooked at low pressure for nine minutes, which was an amalgam of all sorts of contradictory cooking times. (Pressure cooker method mainly from Cook's Illustrated.)

The beans taste delicious, but I'm at the moment reducing the liquid a bit before adjusting salt.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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I should have done less posting and perhaps more pot stirring. The beans reduced more than I had intended. I was aiming for something slightly soupy. But, wow, were they good. I am fond of beans but before acquiring a pressure cooker I almost always used canned...and then there was that time I used beans that had been a pie crust weight...

These were just delightful. I served with sour cream, freshly ground black pepper, and a few shakes of salt. There was no added salt in the pot, just the contribution from the bacon. This dish made for the entire meal.

I'm thinking that maybe the four cups of added water, which is what I thought the CI folks had specified, was a bit too much. Actually, upon rereading, the CI folks say "4 quarts"! Oops. I'm glad I didn't follow their directions.

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I've been using Mark Bittman's slow cooker method (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/06/30/magazine/bittman-slow-cooker.html?_r=0) since it ran in the NYT last June. Works every time. I mean, sometimes you just want to spend about five minutes in the morning and have a nice, hearty comfort dish when you get home. I was quite surprised that this didn't pop up here at the time.

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  • 1 year later...

It's a coolish day here in Buffalo and I decided a nice big pot of bean and barley soup would hit the spot. I chucked sautéed aromatics, roasted tomatoes, veg stock, herbs and a dried 14-bean mix (Wegmans organic), unsoaked, into my crockpot and let it cook away on low all day (9 hours and counting now) I added the barley a little while ago and noticed the beans were still quite tough, so I did a little googling.

Much to my horror, I learned that red kidney beans, which are the first ingredient in my bean mix, are loaded with a toxin - phytohemagglutinin - which causes intestinal distress and which is killed by a soak and a boil pre-cooking. This toxin is more potent when the beans are cooked at temps of 80C, but I can't find any info about temps between 80 and 100.

My soup registered 92C before I turned it up to high in hopes of getting a boil on for an hour or so, but I figured I would ask here - should I chuck the whole pot, or do you think it will be safe after it boils for a bit?

Patty

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I'm still here, and it's been a long time since I soaked red kidney beans (or any other kind of bean, for that matter) before cooking and experienced any issues.

 

I'd bring it up to a full boil and let 'er rip, which should take care of both your issues.

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

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Thanks - I ended up binning the soup after all. Part of it was to go to an elderly aunt who will be checking out of the hospital this week, and I couldn't take the risk.

I knew there was a reason not to eat beans! Now if only I could pronounce the name of the disease it causes.

Glad you are OK although the risk seemed pretty minimal. I have always been a proponent of "if in doubt throw it out".

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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Everything I've ever read says this toxin in red beans is killed by regular cooking. Do your beans come to a boil in your slow cooker? Some of the older models didn't bring liquids to a full boil. New ones come with a HIGH setting and you should always use this for beans, at least for the first few hours. 
Lima beans also pose a special challenge. They also have to be boiled and they also need to cook for some time with no lid to release the gas. But this should be a practice for all slow cooker bean cooking. I put them on in the morning, unsoaked at HIGH and then it goes to LOW automatically after 6 hours. When I come home, I am confused about who did all this glorious cooking all day and then I remember- Me! I remove the lid and let them continue cooking on low for an hour. This allows some air and evaporation which makes the broth much more delicious and apparently releases potentially bad gasses from lima and maybe even red beans. 

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"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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but I can't find any info about temps between 80 and 100.

 

I did some digging last year to find something definitive on this.  The best thing I found was a 1985 article in the Journal of Food Science.  Only the abstract is available without subscription, but I'll quote that in full:

 

Methodology was developed that allowed sensitive measurement of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), the lectin of kidney beans. Trypsinated porcine red blood cells were treated with saline extracts of kidney beans, incubated, and the nonagglutinated cells were quantitated using a Coulter Counter. This hemagglutination activity (HA) assay was then used to monitor the PHA in cooked kidney beans. The thermal treatment (minutes @°C) required to reduce HA by 1 log cvcle was: 12 @ 100°C: 62 @ 93°C: 136 @ 88°C: 160 @ 82°C. Beans were prepared in commercially available low-temperature cookers and evaluated for tenderness and residual hemagglutinating activity.

 

In plain words, for future reference, any slow cooker which hits 88C/190F at least two hours before the beans are finished should be fine.  And the time required goes down as the temp goes up.

 

Incidentally, I found several articles to similar effect.  That one just seemed to me the clearest and most authoritative.

Edited by pbear (log)
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