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JohnnyH

Toning down the heat in chilies

44 posts in this topic

I'd really appreciate it if anyone knows a trick to tone down a (very large) pot of still-cooking chili I'm making for tomorrow's superbowl party. It's a little on the hot side for some of the guests. I'll be putting out the usual additions -- sour cream, cheese, etc., but is there anything I can do now to cool it off?


"All humans are out of their f*cking minds -- every single one of them."

-- Albert Ellis

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The only thing I can think of is to add a pinch of sugar. Take out a cup of chili first and see if it makes any difference; sugar tends to dull spicy flavors a little, but only a little.


Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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Aside from sour cream, the only other trick I know of is to dilute- basically make more chili minus the spices- add more beef, veggies, beans (ducking in case of Texans...)

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I've found that time and continued low-temperature cooking both contribute to lessening the "fire" of chiles. Many times I've thought that the dish I was making was WAY too hot, only to find that the next day it was just right when reheated.

So my recommenation is to let it simmer for a while today, chill overnight, and then do the same tomorrow.

Good luck!

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I've found that time and continued low-temperature cooking both contribute to lessening the "fire" of chiles. Many times I've thought that the dish I was making was WAY too hot, only to find that the next day it was just right when reheated.

So my recommenation is to let it simmer for a while today, chill overnight, and then do the same tomorrow.

Good luck!

I hope you're right... looks like that's the way things are going to go. Off to the supermarket now to by more beer :wink: .

Thanks to all for the help -- if anyone else has any thoughts, please post 'em.

J


"All humans are out of their f*cking minds -- every single one of them."

-- Albert Ellis

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Serve it in smaller portions. Its an old catering trick make it hot, that way it goes further without too many complaints, and few come back for seconds...

If you want serve it with a bland filler, like rice or baked potato on the side.

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I would just dump some more of what ever is in there already, beans,

veggies, whatever, just to be on the safe side because it may not mellow

out. I frequently make things too hot. My husbands favorite (and it's getting

old honey) joke is: "would any one like lip salve with their meal?".


Melissa

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Yup, adding an acid/citrus note is a standard trick in Southwestern cooking. It doesn't tame the heat but balanaces it nicely, creating a perception of less heat. I'm not sure I'd do that to chile, however -- unless you're going for that Bobby Flay Mango Chile sort o' feel.

What I'd do is simply serve the chile over rice or pasta with lots of cheese on top, which has the effect of reducing the portions (or at least proportion) of chile and adding a filler starch.

Chad


Chad Ward

An Edge in the Kitchen

William Morrow Cookbooks

www.chadwrites.com

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Although I haven't tried this myself, I remember hearing that adding a raw potato would draw out some of the spice. Just remember to remove the potato before serving.


Knowledge is good.

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Although I haven't tried this myself, I remember hearing that adding a raw potato would draw out some of the spice. Just remember to remove the potato before serving.

My mom suggested this to me once. She swears a potato works for sucking up fishy tastes and off flavors in old oil (which I don't use anyway).

Anyway, didn't work.


amanda

Googlista

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A big ole sign in front of the bowl proclaiming to everyone it's a genuwine underwear-melting bowl of red is the best I can think of. Then they are properly warned.

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Put a roll of toilet paper in the freezer for later.

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I hope you're right...  looks like that's the way things are going to go.  Off to the supermarket now to by more beer :wink: .

Add a bottle of the beer!


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"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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The only way that i've been able to effectively tone down a pot of hot chili is simple, always works and provides a few more meals if frozen or refrigerated.

I simply make a 1/2 receipe in another pot, with out any of the heat being added to the mixture, cook the smaller pot until done.

Put a Large Bowl or another pot to the side and mix both Hot Chili together with the Unheated Chili until it tastes the way you wished your recipe to taste.

Most of the time all it takes is mixing everything together and reserving all the extra until next time, especially if your pretty sure how to achive your results.

This time of year your not likely to have to much Chili on hand.

Irwin :rolleyes:


I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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I've found that time and continued low-temperature cooking both contribute to lessening the "fire" of chiles. Many times I've thought that the dish I was making was WAY too hot, only to find that the next day it was just right when reheated.

So my recommenation is to let it simmer for a while today, chill overnight, and then do the same tomorrow.

Good luck!

I hope you're right... looks like that's the way things are going to go. Off to the supermarket now to by more beer :wink: .

Thanks to all for the help -- if anyone else has any thoughts, please post 'em.

J

This is actually dangerous. While the heat dissipates, in my experience, it only lessens its effects on the mouth, imo. However, it can still have....internal ramifications. I've made this mistake eating way too much of an item that used to be spicy thinking it wouldn't affect me. Would have paid top dollar for that freezer TP the next day.

The potato thing can work. Just don't eat that potato. Otherwise, coming up with options to dilute or balance the heat are great options. Personally, I like sour cream, cheese, crackers, and the like.

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I thought the potato trick was for too much salt.

If you do end up making a pot of bland chili, then offer three versions: the super hot, medium and mild.

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This is actually dangerous. While the heat dissipates, in my experience, it only lessens its effects on the mouth, imo. However, it can still have....internal ramifications. I've made this mistake eating way too much of an item that used to be spicy thinking it wouldn't affect me. Would have paid top dollar for that freezer TP the next day.

I thought I broke something once when this happened to me.

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I made chili last night/tonight and used a different brand of chili powder than my norm. The stuff is so spicy hot that I can't eat it. Had a peanut butter sandwich for dinner. My husband thought the flavor was great but it was almost too spicy for him - and he likes spicy food!

Any way to salvage this - other than adding another batch of the non-spicy ingredients to thin it out?

Any magical fixes?


"Unleash the sheep!" mamster

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I made chili last night/tonight and used a different brand of chili powder than my norm.  The stuff is so spicy hot that I can't eat it.  Had a peanut butter sandwich for dinner.  My husband thought the flavor was great but it was almost too spicy for him - and he likes spicy food!

Any way to salvage this - other than adding another batch of the non-spicy ingredients to thin it out?

Any magical fixes?

Sweet is often used to balance heat. Unfortunately, it's a delicate balance since chili is a savory dish. Try adding a little sugar or honey and see if you can't bring the heat level down. You might also try serving the chili with some bread.


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A little sour cream on top will help to cut the heat.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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