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Wilfrid

Rösti

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Thank you for the Züri Geschnetzeltes recipe. Why do you consider yours to be unorthodox?

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What are your thoughts on using a metal rosti ring?

I'm not sure I understand what a metal rösti ring is? I have never seen one.

Here is my rosti ring:

gallery_42214_4635_46849.jpg


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Thank you for the Züri Geschnetzeltes recipe. Why do you consider yours to be unorthodox?

Because I poach the meat instead of frying it. I find the texture is much better. I also use shallots and most recipes call for onion.

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Here is my rosti ring:

Ahh! I wouldn't use it unless it is important to the plating procedure to have a small rösti. The reason is, in the beginning, I mix the browned bits into the center of rösti then brown the outsides. It's just my technique and a little difficult to describe. I suppose you could free fry the rösti and just use the ring to form it at the end.


Edited by SWISS_CHEF (log)

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Additional notes on rösti:

Here we serve a rösti on a special platter called a Röstiteller. Potters around the town of Thun are famous for them.

Like pizza, it can come with lots of toppings; poached pears covered in raclette cheese and dusted with curry powder is an example on the more creative side but anything you put on pizza can usually go on a rösti too.

Bacon and/or onions are often mixed into the potatoes before frying.

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Often when we were served Züri Geschnetzeltes only half of the rösti would be plated, along with half of the veal. After devouring that, the second plateful would appear. I always swore I couldn't eat it all, but always did.

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Thanks for the Rosti tips. I will be moving to Zurich in a few months because of my husband's job. I am a chef instructor at Williams-Sonoma as well as a culinary school in New Jersey. I also do some catering. Any tips for me in my job search? It has been frustrating so far. Work papers should not be a problem as my husband will likely get a resident's permit so I can piggyback off of that. Thanks so much for any advice. Amy

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Often when we were served Züri Geschnetzeltes only half of the rösti would be plated, along with half of the veal. After devouring that, the second plateful would appear. I always swore I couldn't eat it all, but always did.

Yes!!! :biggrin:

We also found a # of places in Switzerland that served sausage & rösti, which makes a nice pairing.

I once had a rösti up in Wengen that had the above mentioned bacon, onions & cheese all together in it. Having a wonderful sausage sitting next to it was overkill. Almost. :raz:

I read somewhere, I now have no idea where, that rösti was made as described up top, except that after the frying the mixture was turned out into a baking dish & popped into a hot oven for the final browning, thus cooking the potatoes 3 times. Until now I had assumed that this thrice-cooked approach was the traditional one. Is it not?

Gosh but I love rösti.


Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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I worked with a Chef from Lausanne, when he made rosti he would keep adding butter to the pan as he fried the rosti.

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So I has a taste for Rösti today, and went to make it. I looked for my recipe and could not find it. I found a recipe a while ago, that worked perfectly. I am pretty sure it started with raw potatoes, unlike many of the other recipes around. The real difference about this recipe was it's technique:

The main technique was putting a plate on top of the cooking potatoes. The writer of the recipe said that a plate that fits very tightly into the pan was essential.

So I made it today with peeled russets (what I had), that I cut with a mandoline into very small julliene - but a grater would work too - but probably release more starch as it's not as sharp. All I added was salt and some finely chopped onion. I used a non-stick pan. I fried it in drippings from sauteed beef - because I had it handy. After it was cooked I put some good cheese on top and melted it. Really great texture and taste.

It worked perfectly. No need to wring out the potatoes (and i actually think this is a mistake as the moisture cooks the potatoes!). There are even recipes that add liquids.

The other thing I remember was to cook slowly - so the whole process takes 30 minutes or more! I first browned the potatoes and shook to flip and mix some of the browned bits into the Rösti. Then I put on the plate and turned it to med-low and cooked for 10 minutes, then flipped and put the pan on again for another 10. Then I cooked it without the cover for awhile, and added the cheese last.

I wish I could find the original recipe - but I've really tries to no avail. For all I know this technique was a misinterpretation of the descriptions of using a plate to remove and flip the Rösti.... But I remember there were photos with the recipe.

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I just made rösti last night. Interesting to read the suggestions here. I've got a few small round copper gratin pans all the same size, which make a good sized rösti for two, so last night I made it in one of these pans and flipped it into another pan, and it produced a very neat result. I think I'll do it that way from now on.

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