Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
bleachboy

Sugar on white rice

Recommended Posts

A while back my wife and I were discussing rice, as we are wont to do.

I mentioned that growing up, my family often ate white rice as a side dish, with margarine and sugar spooned on top.

My wife expressed disbelief, and apparently has asked around and can't find anybody else who has ever done this.

Am I alone? Is this just a Texas thing, maybe?


Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have eaten leftover plain rice as a cereal the next morning. Heat gently, add sugar and cinnamon, add milk.

I have however developed an addiction to sugar on popcorn (instead of salt, but with salted butter). -drool-


Screw it. It's a Butterball.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was a favorite breakfast treat when I was little. My mother would warm leftover rice and serve it to me with sugar, cinnamon and lots of butter. Sometimes she would use brown sugar. I hadn't thought of that in years.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm. I always thought it was a midwestern thing. I grew up in TX and my dad ate this as a late-night snack pretty often. He's a hoosier, though, so I always thought it was imported. (Sort of like crackers and milk -- also always associated with Hoosierness for me.)

My whole world is shaken.


amanda

Googlista

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmm. I always thought it was a midwestern thing. I grew up in TX and my dad ate this as a late-night snack pretty often. He's a hoosier, though, so I always thought it was imported. (Sort of like crackers and milk -- also always associated with Hoosierness for me.)

My whole world is shaken.

Crackers (saltines, please) and milk was a staple for me growing up in South Louisiana. Had it maybe once a week. My grandfather was big into that.

Also cornbread and milk. With some good strawberry or fig preserves... I'm making it for breakfast tomorrow. I suddenly feel the need to.


Edited by FistFullaRoux (log)

Screw it. It's a Butterball.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a lot of times in the winter white rice with margarine and sugar would be our supper when we were growing up. hadn't thought about that in years. hope it doesn't turn into one of those cravings.... :hmmm:


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mother would dump leftover popcorn into cereal bowls, sprinkle over sugar, and pour on milk for our breakfasts. We always understood this to be the conjunction of impoverished upbringing and excessive thriftiness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I serve white rice for dinner, my kids and I MUST have sugar on it!! It's a bad habit I taught my kids. I usually cook the rice w/butter, so it's already there. Sugar is sprinkled on at the table. My husband thinks we're all very weird!!

I, too, grew up eating warmed leftover rice, milk and sugar for breakfast!! I think we're very normal!! Maybe my husband's the weird one!! :raz:


pepperAnn

At my house, you get two choices for dinner:

TAKE IT or LEAVE IT!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We did it too. Margarine (yeesh!) and cinnamon sugar.


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my house growing up it was sugar mixed with cinnamon on white rice. Several of my siblings wouldn't eat rice without the topping -- even into adulthood. I found it odd and started eating my rice unadultered abou the time I started grade school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually cook extra rice so I can have a breakfast bowl or two. Brown sugar is good, but to elevate the dish to its pinnacle use light--or even heavy--cream instead of milk. This is the way I prefer oatmeal and cream of wheat, also.

The juxtaposition of cold cream and hot cereal is the best part, and I was always disappointed that only the first few bites were in contrast before the cream got warmed up. Then I read that the English put their cream in a separate dish and dip each spoonful of cereal and sugar into the cold cream. Works for me. Like dessert for breakfast.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luckily, my stint as an imperished college student (God bless the beasts, for without them we should all live like scholars - Rabelais coincided with my residence next to a Vietnamese supermarket. A few bucks for a 25# bag of milagrosa is what stylish poverty is all about.

Rice with wasabi, rice with nguoc mam, rice with beans, rice with zanahorias en escabeche, rice with kecap manis, rice with lentils (lentils are never boring - Neil), rice with sau rieng paste...

Get the picture? Yep, rice with sugar on top is some mighty fine sustenance.


Nam Pla moogle; Please no MacDougall! Always with the frugal...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would stay with my sister who is 5 years older than I for a week during the summers from school. I remember her making this dish often, as she was on a very tight budget and this always did the trick.

I've never eaten it again really and I'm not sure my sister and her family does..she is a fantastic cook and always has been.

I often think about the times, she let her little bratty sister stay with her and we ate her rice/sugar and sometimes or maybe always butter dish!

I'm thinking my Midwestern husband would think it was not so hot...however, I could feed him potatoes like this and he would love it ha! I'm a Louisiana gal and I adore rice any way.

Renee

Oh Yeah! The other dish was hot dogs cut sliced open with BBQ sauce placed under broiler, sometimes with cheese....I also don't eat this anymore!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know about elsewhere, but I grew up in Texas and my dad taught me about rice with sugar, cinnamon and milk or cream (dad grew up in Texas also, as did his father, etc.). It was a dessert dish or a midnight snack in our house. After I learned a bit more about food, I always thought of it as a quick and dirty version of rice pudding.

THW


"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like it is unanimous, almost anyone with Texas connections knows about this dish. My father was from Coleman and we did this often for breakfast. And the rice was cooked especially for this dish in the morning. I do not remember us eating much rice with dinner when I was very young. And the split hot dog with bbq, such memories, i do not know if I would eat the hot dog now, but I am going to go put on a pot of Riceland's best right now. Yum.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mother's family did this sometimes; NJ, by way of the British Isles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a child, I was sometimes given this when I was sick.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a child, I was sometimes given this when I was sick.

Absolutely!! I had forgotten all about that aspect. Did you also get the soft boiled eggs on toast :laugh:?

THW


"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rice with cinnamon, sugar, butter (my mom never fed us margarine - even when we were dirt poor - she definitely could have posted it on the "no substitutions" thread) and milk. I remember it for breakfast but also late nights watching old musicals (Brigadoon, Fiddler on the Roof, Camelot, etc). Nobody in my family is from Texas though....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does toast with butter and sugar count? I used to do that when I was a kid. Made my mom mad b/c I'd just use up the butter that way. But it was GOOOOOD. Haven't had that in years tho.

heh

Soba

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was living in Morocco, I lived for some time with a family in Rabat who had sweet steamed rice at least twice a week for dinner. Steaming the rice took about l hour but the grains were incredibly light and airy and looked splendid piled high on a silver tray streaked with confectioner's sugar and ground cinnamon. We drank buttermilk with it


“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm... Rice still in the rice cooker from my lunch of rice and beans. Jar of Toast Dope on the counter. Room temperature butter in the butter dish.

EUREKA!


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Puerto Rican aunt make "Arroz con Dulce" which seems to be along these lines. It is NOT rice pudding...you put yourself at her mercy if you call it that. I think it's a bit more involved than putting sugar on the rice, but not much.


Nikki Hershberger

An oyster met an oyster

And they were oysters two.

Two oysters met two oysters

And they were oysters too.

Four oysters met a pint of milk

And they were oyster stew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make a bread pudding/risotto kind of thing with leftover rice.

Cold cooked rice

Milk

Sugar

Vanilla

Butter

Cinnamon (if you want it)

Add mixture to saucepan, stir until hot and creamy. Add more milk if the rice soaks it up.

This can be tarted up with lemon zest and other flavorings. I'll subsitute brown sugar for table sugar if it's available. Dead simple dessert. Works wonders.


Screw it. It's a Butterball.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a child, I was sometimes given this when I was sick.

Absolutely!! I had forgotten all about that aspect. Did you also get the soft boiled eggs on toast :laugh:?

THW

No, but I have a repressed memory of mustard plasters. :angry:


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...