Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chris Cognac

Blue Cheese, Whats your favorite kind

Recommended Posts

I think this is a good a place for my first post!

I live in France and we have a cheese plate going at all times. But the only cheese that my husband will not touch is blue cheese, in any shape or form. I have to keep the blue cheeses on a separate plate, he can't stand the idea of even the invisible spores reaching the other cheeses! Therefore, it is my own private domain, my little secret garden.

As a student, long before I had ever been to France, I found a closeout in the imports section at the grocery store of some Saga, which was close to its expiration date. I put it in the fridge, and promptly forgot about it. About a month later, when I was starving and had nothing else to eat, I opened the package, and spread the rich creamy melting result on wheat thins and shamelessly devoured the entire thing with red wine (I forgot what kind). I enjoyed my first sublime experience of a properly affined blue cheese completely by accident.

At the market, from my regular fromagier on the Quai St. Antoine, I regularly get a wedge of Bleu d'Auvergne, and eat a liberal slice daily. It begins as a little salty on my tongue and then explodes into vivid childhood memories of the room where my grandmother, who was a retired English grammar teacher, used to keep her old books. The first time I tasted it, the experience was amazing.

I have found that the way blue cheese is stored can have a big affect on its taste. It's one of those things that muse be allowed to breathe or it develops a distinctive bitterness and ammonia-like overtone and stinging aftertaste. I keep it wrapped loosely in waxed paper, never plastic wrap. When looking for blue cheese, I never buy from a fromagier who has it wrapped in saran. It can go bad that way! I have also found that many blue cheeses are better in the winter than in the summer. Just like many vegetables, this kind of cheese has it's better seasons.

When the cheese comes to the table, the guest is presented with the knife to begin the service. If the guest is not French, everyone stops talking and watches which cheeses they will choose. I made a big no-no the first time, with a roquefort, which is an amazing sheeps cheese aged in caves. I was seated next to my mother in law's sister's husband, who grew up in the town of Roquefort. After the shocked murmurs and hissing whispers died down, he was very thorough in teaching me, in front of the rest of the family, how to cut blue cheese, which is different from many of the other French cheeses. I will pass it on to the members here to hopefully save someone some grief.

Remember that especially with blue cheeses, the quality and taste of the cheese varies greatly from the center to the crust. So it's really important to respect the other cheese lovers at the table and cut a slice that will give a cross section of the whole thing, from center to crust. Lopping off the bluest and best part would be akin to cutting yourself a circle from the middle of a pie and leaving the rest of the people at the table to eat only the crust! (The shame!) Imagine where your wedge would sit in the wheel it was cut from. Then slice off the bottom crust, setting it aside. Take your slice in that same direction, center to crust. Apparently making sure that everyone gets to taste a sample from top to bottom isn't so important.

If this seems too complicated, my suggestion is to shamelessly lop the best and bluest section from your private wedge, enjoy it with nut bread if available, and a glass of whatever good local red wine you have on hand.

I love this site and hope to join in the many fabulous discussions I can only find here. Happy Sunday!

- Lucy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucy, welcome... really, really welcome! Awesome post, thanks for the good information.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great site, Hickory, and the translations are precious. "Recettes de grands chefs" becomes "Receipts of Large Heads". Nevertheless, the site is very informative. It concurs with Lucy's description of how to cut a bleu cheese.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
.........the translations are precious. "Recettes de grands chefs" becomes "Receipts of Large Heads".

You can always county on Google translations for a good chuckle. I noticed that one too :blink: Still, it's usually close enough to get the idea.

Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really enjoying the wedge of Montagnolo I bought last weekend -- St. Andre with the blue cheese bite, very creamy. I'm not as impressed with the Roaring 40s blue, but I am wondering if the store's stock had gone off. It's a dark orange, crumbly rather than creamy and all you can taste is salt. It's not at all what I expected based on descriptions I've read.

(I'm also currently addicted to lemon stilton -- not exactly a blue.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I smoked a beef brisket this weekend and had leftovers....so the next day I chopped some of it up and crumbled Danish Blue over the meat then wrapped it up in a tortilla.....man, it was so good!!!!...What a combo of BBQ/Blue Cheese!


Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shropshire is definately a fav especially on baked potatoes but nothing beats eating roquefort and a glass of sauturnes - especially when you just walk in the door after a long day at work yum! :wub:

oh and if you like goat cheese try the jacquin bluet...pretty good


Laura Langlois-Zurro

http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/

"People who know nothing about cheeses reel away from Camembert, Roquefort, and Stilton because the plebeian proboscis is not equipped to differentiate between the sordid and the sublime."

Harvey Day

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Forme Sauternes - a Forme d'Ambert that's been ripened in Sauternes for 2 months.  Heavenly.

I love Fourme d'Ambert, and that sounds fabulous. Do you make it yourself or buy it somewhere?

This won't help a lot of people, but I had some of this in a restaurant in LA last month, called AOC. It was really, really good. The cheese list as a whole was pretty impressive. The server recommended and I greatly enjoyed a very parm-like aged California cheddar.


Andrew Riggsby

ariggsby@mail.utexas.edu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm really enjoying the wedge of Montagnolo I bought last weekend -- St. Andre with the blue cheese bite, very creamy. I'm not as impressed with the Roaring 40s blue, but I am wondering if the store's stock had gone off. It's a dark orange, crumbly rather than creamy and all you can taste is salt. It's not at all what I expected based on descriptions I've read.

(I'm also currently addicted to lemon stilton -- not exactly a blue.)

Either that Roaring 40's had gone off or it was mislabelled. It's nowhere near orange. I love Roaring 40's...tastes like black walnuts.


Gourmet Anarchy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Cashel Blue - A mild , soft, sweet blue from Tipperary Ireland

2. Roaring Forties - A firm buttery blue from Kings Island Australia

3. Shropshire - Creamy and full flavored

4. Stilton - Always good

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have said it in other threads and will say it again....

Shropshire Blue

That being said, I must admit to a rather odd sandwich that I enjoyed whilst working as pastry chef at a hotel outside of Detroit. Take two thick slices of peasant bread, three stips of bacon, two slices tomato, Honeycup mustard and copious amounts of blue cheese (the hotel generally had a cheap domestic "gorgonzola") Build into sandwich and grill. Yum!!! :biggrin:


Edited by TJHarris (log)

Tobin

It is all about respect; for the ingredient, for the process, for each other, for the profession.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you post photo's?...I cant see them...dammit, I need photos!

No but for some reason I can't use the buttons above the reply text area.


Tobin

It is all about respect; for the ingredient, for the process, for each other, for the profession.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Point Reyes and Berkshire Blue. My love for the Berkshire knows no bounds. I like the roaring 40's as well, but find the Berkshire to be more useful for both straight eating and using in things like my deadly 3 cheese pasta sauce.


What do you mean I shouldn't feed the baby sushi?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll eat just about any blue (except for Bleuet de Chevre, which is an awful plastic-y cheese), but my favorites have to be Great Hill Blue and Pt. Reyes Blue. And I keep a big hunk of Danish blue on hand at all times for everyday cooking and snacking, because it's cheaper and very versatile.


He was a bold man that first eat an oyster. --Jonathan Swift

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll eat just about any blue (except for Bleuet de Chevre, which is an awful plastic-y cheese), but my favorites have to be Great Hill Blue and Pt. Reyes Blue. And I keep a big hunk of Danish blue on hand at all times for everyday cooking and snacking, because it's cheaper and very versatile.

Oh, I love a good Danish blue...you are right,I think it is a good cheese for the money....and welcome to e gullet!


Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just been introduced to SHAFT'S blue cheese...I HIGHLY recommend it...


"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I concur on the Maytag. We now have a holiday tradition where we send my sister in law Vermont maple syrup and she send the Maytag

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a hunk of Point Reyes blue yesterday. I'm just beginning my foray into the world of blue cheese, and I haven't tried very many since I realized that I liked it. My high school biology teacher was right...she said most people develop a taste for blue cheese in their mid 20s. I hated it prior to a year or so ago, when I discovered that I liked it crumbled on salads.

Anyway, really enjoyed the Point Reyes. Salty, but not overly so, with a nice tangy bite and a taste reminiscent of Camembert rind. Tasty.


Gourmet Anarchy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate to sound like a snob, but I was eatting Roquefort in my highchair, and got all pissyoffed when my mother tried to substitute Danish Blue or some other lesser blue. After importiing and selling more than 2,000 cheeses, I have to say that Roquefort is still my favrorite. There are certainly many others -- Fourme Sauternes, Stilton, Roaring Forties, but it is Roquefort all the way ----

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has no one tried True Blue from Australia?

I am extremely partial to gorgonzola Dolcelatte and also to Stilton, however I tried the Aussie blue cheese a couple of years ago and found it very satisfying.

The only Roquefort I like is the Papillon. I have had a couple of bad experiences with roquefort. One time I opened the package and it had a strong odor of ammonia. I took it back to the store and the clerk cut open three other packages, all had the same odor.

I use Maytag when I need a very strong blue, when it is going to mixed into cream cheese, or into a sauce because it is sharp enough to hold its own.

Another domestic blue that I like is Crater Lake Blue, made in Oregon. It is similar to Pt. Reyes but just enough different with a little extra pungency without being harsh.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bleu Bénédictin, produced at the Saint-Benoît Abbey, in Saint-Benoît-du-Lac, Quebec is by far my favourite blue cheese.

I'd have to give Roquefort my silver medal.

Does Cambazola count as a real blue cheese?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...