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Chris Cognac

Blue Cheese, Whats your favorite kind

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This is like asking which of your children you love the most!

I love that... The perfect answer to "what is your favorite _____", which I ask all the time. :smile:


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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any very good blue is wonderful- be it roquefort or cabrales or stilton.

i don't put the best blue in a salad, i prefer it by itself or with fruit.

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In the spirit of getting out of my Stilton rut, I visited my local cheese shop. No Forme Sauternes at present, seldom have it, etc. So I tried their Artisanal Cabrales. On to the next. I didn't find it as complex in flavor as most Stilton and a bit too assertive to eat on its own. I might use the Stilton without some sweet wine, fruit, nuts combo, but this Cabrales requires some counterpoint flavor.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Clemson blue. Made on the campus of Clemson University for 50+ years. A delicious blue that you don't have to take out a mortgage to buy.


Martinis don't come from vodka and bacon don't come from turkeys!

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Clemson blue. Made on the campus of Clemson University for 50+ years. A delicious blue that you don't have to take out a mortgage to buy.

How interesting! I had no idea.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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It's been fun doing a search on this. One of my son's best friends went to school there, and I'm looking forward to asking him about the blue cheese. Have you made this recipe, or any of the others online? I'm going to order some! Thanks for the tip.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I'd like samples of all the above ------ and a spoon.

Also, I like steak grilled with Bleu Cheese.

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For me, its a toss up between crumbly Gorgonzola, Roquefort and Spanish Valdeon (with Cabrales coming in at a close second to Valdeon).

Spanish Valdeon is really excellent....I'd forgotten about that one. It sure is intense. Monje is also imported into the U.S., which is made just up the road from Cabrales. In fact, Monje, in my experience always has the same quality of flavor I love in a good Cabrales but is often lacking in a Cabrales that is not top-notch (I couldn't describe exactly what that flavor is--I just know it when I taste it). Interesting (to me, anyway), considering they're not really the same cheese--not even made with the same milk--just made very close to one another geographically. (Edit: I started to doubt my memory, so I went checking and discovered this site agrees with me!)

And I second Sam Kinsey about the Shropshire blue--it's pretty kick-ass!


Edited by Eric_Malson (log)

My restaurant blog: Mahlzeit!

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Give me Cabrales any time it's findable. Quina's theory on cheese:

Good cheese has flies buzzing around it.

Great cheese has flies dying around it.

Then again, Stilton is a mighty nice standby. Take a bite of the most expensive Stilton you can find and tell me you don't taste the ur-Cheez Wiz.

See? it all comes full circle.


Nam Pla moogle; Please no MacDougall! Always with the frugal...

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For dessert at last night's dinner at Magnolia Grill, I had a blue cheese turnover served with roasted grapes and candied almonds. The blue cheese was slightly sweetened, but made an excellent contrast to the pastry, fruit and nuts. Now if phlawless can tell me what type of cheese she used!


Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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Take a bite of the most expensive Stilton you can find and tell me you don't taste the ur-Cheez Wiz.

As opposed to brie, which is the ur-Velveeta.

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Last night I was enjoying a big hunk of Danish Blue and some toast points for a little snack while watching "The French Connection" for about the millionth time. THe long suffering Mrs. Mayhaw came walking into the room and stood there for a minute with a very unhappy look on her face and said, " I think somebody dumped out the catfood again". :shock: I just pointed to the plate with the cheese crumbs on it and she shook her head and left the room. Needless to say she ins not a big fan of stinky cheese. :laugh:

Incidentally, for all of you book fans out there-there is an excellent childrens book entitled The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Stories. The artwork is wonderful and my children loved this book when they were younger. I highly reccomend it.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Mayhaw-

Down there in Louisiana has any of the French cheesemaking culture made its way in to the local gastronomy? Any notable local cheesemakers or products that survived the journey down there from Acadia? Any particular market demand for stuff other than industrial Wisconsin plastic cheese such that interesting cheesey stuffs appear in supermarkets and other places one wouldn't expect them?


Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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It's been fun doing a search on this.  One of my son's best friends went to school there, and I'm looking forward to asking him about the blue cheese.  Have you made this recipe, or any of the others online?  I'm going to order some!  Thanks for the tip.

Susan, I haven't tried the recipe yet, but it looks delicious. Please let me know how you like the Clemson Blue.


Martinis don't come from vodka and bacon don't come from turkeys!

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I vote for Humboldt Fog and Point Reyes.


I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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My favorite is Cashel Blue. It's an Irish cheese and has a very rich creamy texture with a nice stinky bite. Perfect for breakfast with some ripe fruit or smeared on toast.

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My favorite is Cashel Blue. It's an Irish cheese and has a very rich creamy texture with a nice stinky bite. Perfect for breakfast with some ripe fruit or smeared on toast.

What kind of toast, wheat or sourdough?...what kind of fruit?...This sounds good!


Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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Gorgonzola dolce. It melts like Butter in mashed potatoes or risotto. My Father used to make me fried baloney and stinky cheese sandwiches when Mom was out of town. Try it some time, it still brings a tear to my eye. But most of his cooking brought a tear to our eyes.


Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Some one mentioned Saga earlier, it's pretty good and easy to find.

Castello (Denmark) makes a soft blue that has a butter like quality. It is the smoothest blue I’ve found. It claims to be triple-cream; not sure what that means exactly. OMG so good. Nibbled on crackers or stuffed in a big fat burger. mmmmm.

Great thread!

--therese


Many parts of a pine tree are edible.

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I prefer a Cabrales, with figs or dried apricots. I prefer a Maytag in a salad. Humboldt Fog is extraordinary as well.

I, too love humboldt fog. And although it is ripened, it is not a blue. It has a layer of vegetable ash in the center, no mold.

I use Blue d' Auvergne in salads, and for blue cheese butter that is a must on steaks. Carles roquefort is a favorite as well, but, due to the weak dollar vs. euro, very expensive.

Saga melts great on burgers with carmelized onions.

Colston basset is the best producer of stilton.

Please do not ever eat Domestic Gorgonzola. Putrid.


Lisa K

Lavender Sky

"No one wants black olives, sliced 2 years ago, on a sandwich, you savages!" - Jim Norton, referring to the Subway chain.

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I like St. Agur left out at room temperature for two days before I dig into it...Too bad not much is left for anyone else/


“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

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Some one mentioned Saga earlier, it's pretty good and easy to find.

Castello (Denmark) makes a soft blue that has a butter like quality. It is the smoothest blue I’ve found. It claims to be triple-cream; not sure what that means exactly. OMG so good. Nibbled on crackers or stuffed in a big fat burger. mmmmm.

Great thread!

--therese

Danish Blue Castello gets my vote. So creamy and buttery and a little mild but so flavorful. Incredible in green salads with grapes ....one of my very favorite things in the world! Cabazola and Gorgonzola are my next choices.

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