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Chris Cognac

Blue Cheese, Whats your favorite kind

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I love Blue Cheese...I was thinking that many of you do as well. Few cheeses taste as good with balsamic or a nice glass of port as a good Blue...So I ask you all, what is your favorite type of Blue Cheese. I love a good Dutch Blue as I think it has a lot of depth to the flavor as it seems to fill your entire mouth with flavor rather than just the tongue. I also enjoy a Blue Gouda that I get at Whole Foods and think its a good hybrid type cheese. I also can not forget....Bob's Big Boy blue cheese dressing....oh yea, does not get better than that.


Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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I'm awfully fond of Roquefort; especially along with some toasted walnuts, apple slices and maybe a nice glass of dessert wine.

Man, that would be great on an icy night like tonight...

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Recently I've been chowing down on a hunk of Boro Market Stilton (also purchased at Whole Foods). I love it! Tastes great alone. Or with salami. Or mixed in with pasta. Yum.

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There are some "soft blues" that are really great. I can get a cheese called "Saga" at my local grocery store. It's pretty good, but no where near as good as the Italian and french soft-blues that I've had.

I can't remember the names of either of the European cheeses. :sad: I think that the Italian cheese was a sheep's milk cheese and the French one was from cow's milk. Both were small, pungent, creamy, "smelly" cheeses. Just like those other soft, runny cheeses - only shot through with blue mold. Yummy!

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Last spring I took the cruise from hell. The only good thing to eat on this cruise was the cheese, especially the blue cheese. Every night I ordered a plate of cheese, with extra blue cheese. It kept me alive for a week. I love blue cheese. :wub:


Edited by hillvalley (log)

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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For New Year's Eve(our Christmas) Susan brought a selection of blues for tasting with champagne.

They were(with tasting notes)

Roaring 40's - "i hate to say it" , said multiple times "the after taste remines me of the subtle smell when you are driving through fram country due to the dried cow patties. I think this is from the rind."

suzilightning - not that this a bad thing but this is a much more subtle taste than one that will leave me salivating for 5-10 minutes later

Gorganzola - creamy, salty

Roquefort - much more of a bite - tastes like a musty mushroom - those that are the bad ones that taste good

Stilton - almost as creamy as the Roquefort but more subtle

Maytag - sharpest, most robust, and least salty but it bursts onto the palate and lingers for several minutes

My favorite way - blend several of the lesser cheeses like they do with champagne before the bubbles and smear on bread.


"Let's do another bad one 'cause I like it when the blood drains from Dave's face"

"Pickle -ickle - ickle"

Warren Zevon

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Stilton with port, roquefort with ice wine or sherry. :smile:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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At Fox and Obel, here in Chicago, they had an amazing cabrales, wish I could remember the name. It went incredibly well with their nut and dried fruit bread. IMO their bakery is doing some of the best bread in the city right now. To keep with the theme, my wife and I opened a nice bottle of rioja and sat in front of the fire........

for about 4 minutes before the baby started screaming and while we were gone the dog ate the bread. Thank God the wine and cheese were left. They still tasted pretty good over the kitchen sink with carr's crackers. :laugh:


Patrick Sheerin

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I love pretty much all bleus including those mentioned above, but I recently discovered is Buffalo Blue from Shepherd's Purse in England. It is wonderfully creamy with a delicious piquant flavor. I purchased it from iGourmet which has the most incredible selection of bleu and other cheeses that I have ever seen.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Cambozola!!!!


Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. They already know that they are arrogant bastards with a morbid sense of humor. Telling them the obvious accomplishes nothing.

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A great subject!

We have currently been enjoying a Cabrales, which is, at this very time, my favorite blue cheese. Usually a good Gorgonzola is my favorite everyday blue cheese.

I have posted some of the ways we have used the Cabrales on the ongoing dinner thread, but it is surely worth repeating that this recipe for Roasted Sweet Onions with Cabrales is heavenly. I follow the recipe exactly, except for using pine nuts instead of almonds.

The Cabrales is delicious (maybe even at its best) on it's own.

And, for what's available regularly in the supermarkets, I love a snack or appetizer of Saga Bleu spread on celery.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I like all the great blues, especially sweet gorgonzola served w/chestnut honey or roasted grapes. Also, Stilton with port as Marlene mentioned above.

Cambozola is great smeared on crusty bread for a roast beef sandwich!

edited to add: Thanks all for the descriptions of Cabrales; I haven't had it yet but am eager to try it!


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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In the early 1990s Atlas Deli in Madison, WI had a fabulous cheese counter. There I discovered my very favorite Cabrales. I don't remember the name of the producer but the veining was so dense that there looked more vein than cream-colored cheese. Also, the veins were absolutely ink black. The cheese was wrapped in chestnut leaves. Simply beautiful stuff.

I've had many delicious Cabrales since but none has captured me like the one from Atlas. <sigh>


Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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I know this may not be as "gourmet" as some of you like...But I make a blue cheese, bacon and creamy minute rice dish that everyone I have made it for loves....Its simple and takes about 8 mins....Just melt some butter with shallots and garlic, stir in the raw minute rice, then add cream or half and half and cook, add the blue cheese crumbles and bacon crumbles....stir till its the consistancy you want and eat....mmmm good stuff...but about a million calories!


Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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maytag.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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Just to burst everyone's bubble here, I have to say that I hate any and all blue cheeses in any carnation whatsoever. I can't even describe how vile they taste to me.

try really good Cambozola :)

I try to smear it on bread at times but usually it doesn't make it so far and i eat it plain


Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. They already know that they are arrogant bastards with a morbid sense of humor. Telling them the obvious accomplishes nothing.

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Just to burst everyone's bubble here, I have to say that I hate any and all blue cheeses in any carnation whatsoever. I can't even describe how vile they taste to me.

I can't imagine a very dry boodles martini without blue cheese stuffed olives.

And when did carnations start coming in blue cheese, talk about edible flowers?!


Patrick Sheerin

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I'm not sure of the maker of the delicious Cabrales we have, but FYI, this is where I ordered it.

Just to burst everyone's bubble here, I have to say that I hate any and all blue cheeses in any carnation whatsoever. I can't even describe how vile they taste to me.
Janet, do you like Brie? If so, maybe even try Saga Bleu, mentioned by a couple of us. It is really mild, tasting more of double creme than bleu.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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