Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Mandolines


mamster
 Share

Recommended Posts

i recently used one of these kyocera slicers for the first time. it is very small, and non-adjustable, but i found it nifty, in that the blade is elevated, and sharp on both sides, so that you can make a cut on the downstroke, then another cut as you slide the food back up--kinda double-barreled, as it were. 

Yeah, the Kyocera really isn't a mandoline. It's small and non-adjustable and doesn't do julienne or waffle-cuts. However, you can get the slicer and the julienne cutter for under forty bucks - that qualifies as "cheap" in my book. Since Nikki mentioned that she wanted to make thin slices fast I thought that the Kyocera might be of interest. For something more versatile the benriner-style gadget is probably a better choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I own and use a SS Bron, the only complaint I have is that it takes a little work go clean it.

If I need to do a small batch of slicing, I use a knife. Both of these devices need practice.

If you purchase a Mandoline for home use then don't take the safety off. Practice and when you get really comfortable toss the safety.

When large batches of potatoes I slice until it gets kind of small then go on to the next one. Then I go back with a towel to complete the slicing operation on the smallish pieces.

Yes I have sliced myself in the past, part of learning respect for your mandoline.

Never trust a skinny chef

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
I own two mandolins:  The French-made, stainless-steel Bron Professional requires that the cook devote sufficient time to become proficient in its use.  I use the Zyliss V-type slicer much more frequently.  It’s well-designed & durably constructed from ABS plastic & polycarbonate plastics, so it will stand up to tough usage.  The V-slicer is ideal for making rapid processing of vegetables for mirepoix, for slicing apples for tarts, or onions for chowder. The food holder properly secures items such as cucumbers & zucchini for longitudinal cutting. Thin or thick slicing, julienne or batonnet – all in all, a tool which I would recommend for anyone’s batterie de cuisine.

I tried the Zyliss recently and kept having problems with the slices jamming at the deepest part of the V. It seems as though the V makes a pinch point, right at what's usually the thickest part of the object to be sliced. After messing with trying to slice potatoes and eggplant, I gave up on it.

Anyone else have that problem, or did I have a bad V-cutter? Surely it wasn't operator error! :biggrin:

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Find the Cooks catalog one day sale thread. They have one on sale today only. it is

http://www.chefscatalog.com/store/catalog/...0000&cmCat=Here

Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I'm pulling this back up to the top to see if someone will answer. The V-blade mandolines look to me as though they have an automatic pinch point (the apex of the V) right at the thickest part of most items you'd be slicing. The one time I tried a Zyliss V-slicer, I did end up with stuff getting stuck and breaking off right there, instead of slicing neatly. What a pain - I went back to my knife and my not-quite-perfect slices to finish.

Has anyone else had this experience? Has someone here researched the issue of blade angle to performance? It looks to me as though a slightly angled blade - not straight across the holder, but going all in one line instead of a V, would be the optimal geometry.

Yours in equipment geekiness,

Nancy

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kyocera makes a plastic slicer with a ceramic blade that's razor-sharp. It's on the small side and doesn't have interchangeable blades. They make a separate julienne slicer which I haven't tried. Not as versatile as one with interchangeable blades, but there are fewer parts to get lost in the utensile drawer.

:smile:

I have one of the julienne slicers. I bought it for the purpose of making jicama slaws and such. It cuts way too small and was very hard to use. It took a lot of pressure to cut jicama and basically turned it to mush. Since I have wanted a mandoline primarily for thin slicing and julienne, I think I am about to give it up. My new Kitchen Aid food processor has a large size grating disc that makes lovely squarish "straws" of carrot, jicama and such. I am probably going to get the julienne disc and reduce my chances of injury. :biggrin:

Thanks for bumping this up, Smithy. I was just talking to a friend the other day about which mandoline he ought to buy. He insists he has to have one. I have looked at the V slicers with the same question, but I have never tried one. It just seems like a bad way to go. I saw something on History Channel (I think) about the different designs that the French tried when perfecting the guillotine... straight, V shaped, slanted. They found the slanted blade to be superior. Can potatoes be any different than necks? :laugh:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is there a page anywhere with statistics on these mandolins? I want one to make 8mm slices of squash, but it's sometimes hard to find a product page that contains this specification. Any pointers?

Thanks,

Walt

---------------------------------------------------------

Well you won't have a problem with the Bron, there is a lever that you move one way or the other to get to whatever thickness you want, it is infinitely adjustable.

I have been using mine for many, many years. I have had the blades replaced once, about 8 or 9 years ago. When I am doing a big batch of something like cucumber slices for pickles, 20 pounds or so, I just set the Bron in one of the bus tubs (a rectangular tub available at Smart & Final or other restaurant supply places) and start in. I work sitting down, as this is usually a prolonged job, with the tub on a stool which I also use for holding very deep pots and etc., and onto the top of which I have tacked some of the non-slip shelf/drawer liner to hold it in place.

I have tried all of the knock-off slicers of every type and have never found one that works as well as the Bron. I paid 69.00 for the one I have, it still has the price on the end of the original box.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---------------------------------------------------------

I have tried all of the knock-off slicers of every type and have never found one that works as well as the Bron.  I paid 69.00 for the one I have, it still has the price on the end of the original box.

Andie, was that $69 in 1970 dollars or $69 in 2000 dollars?

What I'm really getting at is, which version of the Bron do you have? The one I like the looks of best is, naturally, the most expensive version. I've never seen it for less than $100, and I'd rather have money left over for my next pot. :rolleyes:

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many thanks!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just saw the Oxo for the first time today when our rep demonstrated it (we don't yet have it in stock at Sur La Table, where I work, but supposedly it's on its way). It's got some good features and at $70 it's very reasonable.

Good points:

One removable blade with two edges - one straight and one waffle -- you just slide it out, flip it over and slide it back in.

Lower profile and better angle (to me at least).

A dial to adjust slice thickness and to pull up two julienne blades.

Not so great points:

A dial to adjust slice thickness and to pull up two julienne blades. Great idea; not so easy in practice. I couldn't tell if it was just that it was new, or if it was me, but the rep had trouble switching between the selections as well.

I don't know -- I have a German V-slicer and it works fine for what I need it for. For me, the only thing the Oxo does that mine doesn't do is waffle cuts, so it's not really worth it for me o upgrade. On the other hand, if I were purchasing my first, the Oxo would be a serious contender.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I don't know, this post could go as easily into the "When Cheaper is Just Fine" thread, but I'm putting it here. Following Behemoth's lead (from the Dinner thread?) I decided to buy a cheap mandoline and see how I liked it. Progressive International makes it. It's plastic, with a guillotine-angled straight steel blade. (I still think that makes the most sense, and Fifi's information supports those notions.) It has 4 gizmos that snap in and out to adjust the size of the cut, and a couple of are reversible so there are effectively 7 different slicing or grating options. All told, this mandoline will do 3 slicing thicknesses, coarse or fine grating, julienne cuts or French fry cuts. I've been playing with it, and am delighted, and far more impressed than I was with the $50 Zyliss V-slicer I tried recently. Nothing jams. It's easy to clean. Who knows how well it will hold up? But for the price I can keep using and replacing it, and may only need to do so once a year....

It cost $8 at Cub Foods! :wub:

Use the finger guard. Even, or especially, if you're trying to get that last slice of pepper. :angry:

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I got the Oxo last week, and used it for the first time on potatoes for dinner tonight. Its fantastic. I've never owned a mandoline before, as they either looked to big and scary, or kinder egg surpise flimsy. This one is neither. Solid on the table-didn't have my usual fear that the thing was going to go flying off the counter, and I would somehow flay the skin from my forearm. Good size hand guard, and the blade selector is indeed easy to use. Jaz, I don't know what was wrong with your rep, I was able to grasp the concept immediately, and I am notorious for being kind of dumb in that department. Seen The Simpsons epi where Homer tries to put together the outdoor grill, gets frustrated, runs at it in a rage and just hammers the pieces together where he thinks they should fit? Thats me. I love oxo, because their stuff looks good, its durable, and the design is intuitive. I glanced at the instruction manual, but it was so obvious what did what, I could've thrown it out immediately. Great design team there.

Anyway, I've only used the plain slice setting, so I still have some playing to do, but even if I only use it to get perfect 1/8" potato slices, I'm happy with it. Definitely worth $70.

*edited because I just realized I actually spelled it 'potatoe'.

Edited by Dani Mc (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll second the Oxo. It is very easy to use and much more intuitive (and safe) than my more expensive one. For a home cook this one wins hands down.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know, this post could go as easily into the "When Cheaper is Just Fine" thread, but I'm putting it here.  Following Behemoth's lead (from the Dinner thread?) I decided to buy a cheap mandoline and see how I liked it.  [etc]

It cost $8 at Cub Foods!  :wub:

Use the finger guard.  Even, or especially, if you're trying to get that last slice of pepper. :angry:

Smithy, just spotted this pot. Mine has an adjustable thickness dial, a bunch of different blade inserts, and works like a charm. I was really close to buying the Oxo, but this one was $20, and I used the $50 I saved to buy an All-Clad Masterchef 12-inch skillet (also at TJMaxx...) :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

Hi All,

I am on a quest to get the most of my newest toy, a mandoline (a birthday present, 36 - Brrrrrrr). I searched the forum for mandoline related threads and found a few useful ones, but unfortunately, most of these threads stray into sliced off fingers and the merits (or non-merits...) of various makes.

So here's the challenge: Recipes that use this wonder of razor sharp steel, so I can show my mom that her trip to the kitchen store wasn't wasted. I'm a fairly accomplished cook and ready to try all sorts of stuff (not just potatoes...)

Thanks in advance

/Mette

p.s. I mostly hang out in 'pastry and baking' but was adviced that there are lots of savory whizzes here willing to help in the mandolinizing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most impressive are fine, even julienne of root veggies (celeriac remoulade, carrot salad, shoestring potatoes, veggie soup with julienned veg instead of diced). Also on my list is gaufrette slice of potatoes. Finally, paper-thin slices of potatoes (lengthwise), sandwiching some green herbs (tarragon, chervil, cilantro), then brushed with oil or butter and baked into chips.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use mine to rapidly obliterate piles of carrots and cabbage into lovely julienne shreds for purposes of making Thai-style spring rolls. Also, you can cut things like zucchini and cucumber into long long thin even slices by pushing the whole vegetable along the blade. When I worked as a chef for a sorority and they wanted tea sandwiches, the mandoline made short work of several English cucumbers for cucumber sandwiches. Gaufrettes of any root vegetable are a neat trick. The mandoline is a fun toy--until you get cut that is! (And you will.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Picnic season may be drawing to a close, but there's always Slaw in all its infinite varieties.

I'm a fan of quick pickled cucumbers, Scandinavian style, and the thinner you can slice them the better. Start with an English, Persian or Israeli cucumber ("seedless"), toss the slices with salt, let them sit in a colander for a half hour or so, then quickly rinse and press the remaining water out. Mix a couple tablespoons of plain white vinegar with a teaspoon of sugar, chop up some dill if you like, toss, and let marinate for no more than an hour. In fact, you don't have to let them marinate at all. These are meant to be consumed the day you make them.

Many other vegetables also work well with this quick pickling process. Cabbage, red, savoy or regular, of course, but also summer squashes. Experiment. Unlike the cucumbers, cabbage/onion combos treated this way hold up for at least a few days, maybe a week. You just want to be sure not to use too much of the marinade. Just enough for a the lightest possible coating. You do not want vinegar pooling in the bottom of the bowl.

I second and third the celeriac remoulade recommendation. And for a variation of the au gratin potatoes, try Jansson's Temptation, a variation from Scandinavia which involves Swedish anchovies (which are more like sardines, actually) and lots of butter and cream.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use the julienne blade for making vegetable "noodles." Zucchini, daikon radish, carrots -- blanch them briefly, then toss with rice vinegar, toasted sesame oil and some sesame seeds. I also sometimes add some reconstituted, dried hijiki.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...