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Sausages in Japan


torakris
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In the Nathan's Famous thread

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=34814

wesza said:

I always was impressed with the many varieties of Sausages available that were actually made in Japan.

They even had a excellent Hot Dog that was made from Tuna that was comparable to a Hebrew National Frank that was used as the model at the Japanese owned Factory located in Taiwan. It was amazing how similar in taste and texture they tasted to compared to the real thing. Wonder if they are still available.

Irwin

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I have to admit when I read this I wasn't sure what Irwin was talking about, fish sausages are very popular here, usually as snacks for kids but I thought they tasted horrible.

They are usually sold at room temperature and have an incredibly long shelf life that is scares me to think of what they may contain.

They are normally just referred to as sakana soseji (fish sausage) and I don't remember ever seeing one that specifically mentioned tuna so I did some searching and sure enough they are still available.

here is one

http://www002.upp.so-net.ne.jp/gyonikukan/...o/tanemono.html

the tuna one is second from the bottom.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Still, you don't see sausage as a component of traditional japanese dishes, though.

No they don't play a part in traditional cuisine but they are a very big part of modern Japanese home cooking.

I would estimate that over 85% of my neighbors have sausages in their refrigerators at this very moment. :biggrin: and they use them in many creative ways.

Some Japanese companies are now making excellent sausages, Kamakura Ham for example is quite famous for their sausages and hams.

http://www.kamakura-ham.co.jp/

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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They really use them in EVERYTHING! :biggrin:

The most common sausage type in Japan are similar to what you see in American markets labeled cocktail sausages.

here are some pictures (there are a couple of pages!)

http://gourmet.yahoo.co.jp/bin/rsearch?p=%...%BB%A1%BC%A5%B8

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I have to admit when I read this I wasn't sure what Irwin was talking about, fish sausages are very popular here, usually as snacks for kids but I thought they tasted horrible.

They are usually sold at room temperature and have an incredibly long shelf life that is scares me to think of what they may contain.

They are normally just referred to as sakana soseji (fish sausage) and I don't remember ever seeing one that specifically mentioned tuna so I did some searching and sure enough they are still available.

here is one

http://www002.upp.so-net.ne.jp/gyonikukan/...o/tanemono.html

the tuna one is second from the bottom.

torakris:

I'm sure that ifyou shop in some of the major Ginza Food Courts you'll come across a surprising variety of Sausage Products.

Some of the best Ham, Portugese Sausage, Bacon and Wursts i've enjoyed were from sources in and around the Tokyo area.

Considering the large amount of expatriates and the greater amount of Japanese business men whom have spent time traveling and often residing all over the world in many cases with their wives and children there should be a more viable market.

Especially when you consider the cultures one upsmanship that involves a undercurrent not appearent to outsiders of "FACE" as it's different in Japan then other Asian Countries. Given the opportunity there is a inclination to show off.

This is especially obvious if you take into consideration the popularity of Cheese anythings and the expensive Coffee Houses.

The tougest sell into any Asian Culture has been Cheeses. Coffee you can sweeten, cream and flavor. But Cheeses still are Cheeses with all their attributes yet they are popular, true with only a very small segment of the population, but that one is very influentual. There are lots of Italian Restaurants, Pizza Places so why not Hot Dog Joints or even Cheese Steaks.

It's a growing market for anything different it's only a matter of timing, location and deep pockets. With that Combo anything goes. Persistance Pays $$$$$$. In most any votiile market. American companys have been fortunate in getting suitable franchise partners in Japan as many of them are multinational companies.

Irwin

Irwin

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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Japanese sausage is one thing I buy very cautiously. I think the quality has improved in recent years, if you are selective, but it used to be the one thing guaranteed to make me throw up (sorry for the detail).

What to do with it (if you actually eat it)...make sausage octopus! This lunchbox favorite involves cutting the bottom end of a sausage into several strips, leaving them attached at the "head" end. When fried or boiled, the "legs" curl up.

I quite like the lemon/parsley and shiso flavors, but my sons won't let me put them in the shopping basket because they have nitrates (nitrites?? forgotten the English version!) and insist on the really expensive varieties.

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Helen, I know what you mean about the sausages, they make me sick to.

Well the cheap ones at least, and even the cheap ones are on the expensive side.

I rarely buy sausages, but my favorites are those shiso or lemon-parsley ones you mentioned, my kids don't know about nitrates yet! :biggrin:

I always look at the nice freshly made sausages in department store basements, thinking that someday I can afford them.....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Very good German type sausages can be found at the Lecker-Bisson shop, in Meguro, on Meguro Dori. They make all of their sausages, and smoked meats, on premesis. Their tongue is outta this world! Once every few weeks, they do a brisket that is made to be married with a very good rye bread.

Oy,

MM

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  • 10 months later...

Has anyone discussed gyoniku sausage (fish sausage)?

It happens to a favorite of mine.

Left: Fish sausage cut and pan-fried with salt and pepper but with no oil

Right: Fish sausage cut and pan-fried with no oil or seasoning

(This is for my daughter, who can't eat spicy food yet)

gallery_16375_5_1103065541.jpg

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Son1 is a big fan of fish sausage, and I'm happy to keep him supplied - a great food for a 12 year old boy!

However, I don't care for them myself. For westerners, there are just too many barriers: the color, the texture, and definitely ajinomoto! Now if they'd called them "Sakana Skweekies" or something like that, I could have taken an unprejudiced bite.

I prefer the chunkier texture of satsuma-age to the chikuwa-type texture that seems to have inspired fish sausage, anyway. Maybe if they left a few scales or something in, just for textural interest :laugh: ?

Today I bought some carbonara sausage photo second down from top a pork sausage from Nisshin Ham, so we can have them with mizuna salad, thin-sliced ham, and gruyere cheese on round white "Heidi", top center breads from Andersen Bakery.

This is a Mum-and-kids dinner for days when husband is out, and we don't have to eat RICE!

P.S. I've saved a sausage for my husband's lunchbox tomorrow, in case you feel a brotherly instinct to defend my husband's right to luxury sausage, Hiroyuki!!

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P.S. I've saved a sausage for my husband's lunchbox tomorrow, in case you feel a brotherly instinct to defend my husband's right to luxury sausage, Hiroyuki!!

I know better than to meddle in another family's affair, but I can tell you that it's a game that two can play. :biggrin:

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  • 2 months later...
Very good German type sausages can be found at the Lecker-Bisson shop, in Meguro, on Meguro Dori.  They make all of their sausages, and smoked meats, on premesis. Their tongue is outta this world!  Once every few weeks, they do a brisket that is made to be married with a very good rye bread.

Oy,

MM

I just found, actually I knew about it for a while just never went, a German style sausage shop 5 minutes from my house.

He had a nice selection, and was very talkative :biggrin: , it was mostly German style things (duh!) but he also had some chorizo (that looked great) and some things with a Japanese flavor including miso bacon (wonderful!), shiso sausages (the best I have ever eaten!) and wasabi sausage (gonna get that next time). We picked up a sausage sampler

gallery_6134_549_30061.jpg

my husband and kids got at it while I was hunting for the camera....

their homepage (lots of gorgeous pictures) can be found here:

Stadt Schinken

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 3 months later...
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