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The Ducasse method of cooking steak


Jinmyo
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This is on cooking a ribeye steak.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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It's one of the more interesting chef pieces I've seen in the Times, not so much from the standpoint of the recipe but more on account of the commentary. I wonder how much of it is Ducasse and how much of it is Fabricant; though I think it is mostly Ducasse. I assure you, however, that if Ducasse wrote well in English, his tone would be quite different. Nonetheless, he makes some important points both about cooking steak and about the role of the chef in general. In particular, I agree emphatically with the notion that steak should be cooked slowly -- a realization I only arrived at when researching an article last year on how real chefs cook steak, wherein I sampled many steakhouse steaks against non-steakhouse restaurant steaks with a critical eye for the first time.

Bux, also note here the use of "marmalade."

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Interesting article, thanks.  That was the first time I have ever heard about the slow method for cooking steak.  I would not have given much credence to it, until I read that Steven agrees with him (and I trust Steven!).  I agree with the author that the rib-eye steak has the most flavor.

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I agree emphatically with the notion that steak should be cooked slowly -- a realization I only arrived at when researching an article last year on how real chefs cook steak, wherein I sampled many steakhouse steaks against non-steakhouse restaurant steaks with a critical eye for the first time.

Steven, I would love to read the article you wrote.  Would you be willing to share it?  Is it available online through a link?  Can you give us any other steak preparation tips you learned through your research?

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I'm not so sure about slow cooking myself. But then I very specifically want charred surfaces and fat and a basically raw interior. I never knife and fork steak. I make paper-thin slices to be dipped in jus, shoyu, and wasabi. Or a Dijon/horseradish/peppercorn sauce.

I liked the idea of doing the fat side first to get the stuff into the pan so it can be absorbed.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Blue Heron, the article -- which appeared in Hamptons magazine -- is not available online, I'm sorry to say.

Ducasse covered the key points. Salt is another big issue. I can e-mail you the article if you like -- just e-mail me steven@fat-guy.com and I'll reply. Others are welcome to do so as well, so long as it's not so many people that it would offend the publisher. It's not a hardcore cooking piece -- it's written for a general audience -- but it has some interesting tips here and there.

Jinmyo, I think caramelization is good and char is bad. Slow cooking allows one but avoids the other. The thicker the piece of meat, the better the method works. I encourage comparative tasting for all who doubt.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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In Ducasse's restaurant kitchen, they use stainless for this purpose. Cast-iron should work as well or better on a home stove. Because the temperatures being used are moderate, most any material will do so long as it has even heat distribution. That's what I think at least.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Ducasse's method is similar to Colicchio's for the pan-roasted sirloin described in Think Like a Chef, the main difference being that the former browns the steak in its rendered edge fat, while the latter browns in oil, and does the edges later.  Both cook the meat slowly, both stand their steaks on edge, and both baste with butter with garlic or herbs in the latter stages of cooking.

"To Serve Man"

-- Favorite Twilight Zone cookbook

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I tried the Ducasse method last night with a 3" thick, 2# prime rib, bone in. Cooked it on the grill, with a cast iron skillet specifically reserved for outdoor grill use.

Very impressive results. The meat was wide enough that it could stand upright on its fat side and render the fat. I pressed cracked pepper and dried green chile powder into the wide sides. Added a little canola oil to the pan, along with salt, fresh rosemary, and crushed garlic. Nuked a few Idaho potatoes, and finished them on the gril. Then, mashed with butter and cilantro.

Might as well have injected rubber cement into my veins for all the cholesterol I ingested, but it was very good.

Apparently it's easier still to dictate the conversation and in effect, kill the conversation.

rancho gordo

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I have long used the cooking-on-the-fat side method for pork and lamb chops, mainly because I want the fat more thoroughly cooked than the flesh.  I have used the method, less often, for steak.  I thought it was obvious, but maybe I underestimate myself. :wink:

I was puzzled by the comment that any meat not cooked in liquid should stand for at least half as long as the cooking time.  Surely that's not a general principle.  I mean, a turkey roasted for four hours needs to stand for at least two?  Don't believe it.

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I suspect Ducasse considers turkey as poultry rather than meat in the application of his general principle. Red meat that is still rare after grilling or roasting, should sit for a while. That much is certain.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I cooked a boneless rib-eye as per Ducasse's recipe (sans marmalade) this past Thursday. I was able to get a uniform crust without a hint of char. It ended up being medium instead of medium rare (I think because I overcompensated for using a cast iron skillet) but was very delicious and tender. It did not render as much fat as indicated in the recipe, perhaps the butcher trimmed too much?

However, in general I find that cut just too fatty for my taste. Could anyone recommend a cut that has the exterior fat to render, but less interior fat that needs to be trimmed away before eating?

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There are really only three cuts used for top-quality steaks: The rib, the tenderloin, and the shell/strip (also sometimes called sirloin). The porterhouse is tenderloin plus strip, so it's not really an additional cut. Most of the other steakhouse steaks are variations of bone in or bone out or different thicknesses (cote de boeuf is just a double-cut rib steak, for example). Of those, the only candidate for your use besides the rib is the strip. You should be able to get a boneless New York strip with a good deal of exterior fat left on if you ask to have it butchered that way. At least, it will have fat around most of it -- though not the part that was adjacent to the bone. Yet it will have very little interior fat, other than marbled fat which isn't what you're trying to avoid. If you go to Ducasse's restaurant and get a rib steak, by the way, they trim away all that fatty stuff before plating it. So you only get the nice meat from that round section of meat and none of that other stuff. Very wasteful, very expensive, very delicious.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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If you go to Ducasse's restaurant and get a rib steak, by the way, they trim away all that fatty stuff before plating it. So you only get the nice meat from that round section of meat and none of that other stuff. Very wasteful, very expensive, very delicious.

How do they present this?

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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  • 6 months later...

Jin, so sorry I missed your post way back when -- I thought the thread had petered out. Anyway, to answer your question, a couple of waiters come out with a big cart that has a burner on it and a whole bunch of plates and knives and a carving board and whatnot. Then someone comes from the kitchen with the whole steak-for-two in a presentation pot and the head waiter carves it up and plates the choice pieces. While this is going on, another guy comes from the kitchen with little copper pots full of various vegetables, which are kept warm on the burners for the thirty seconds they are unused. The plates are garnished elaborately with various vegetables and then there are more garnishes placed on side plates. Then they bring out a supplemental serving of a different kid of beef stir-fried with Asian vegetables, as a side dish as well. And maybe something else. I think it's four plates altogether, though I can't find a photo to confirm.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Steve, thanks.

Tableside service of this nature (and presumably stykle and quality) is almost vanished. The copper pots, the burners, the carving. Sigh.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Okay, since it's been a year and I think the Copyright has reverted to me, I'll reproduce the piece I did on steak last summer. Note that some of these restaurants are closed. But it's a decent overview of the whole steak thing. Forgive the odd formatting:

+++

Slug: Dining Around: Gotham

Hed: Steak without the Steakhouse

Dek: The city's ten best non-steakhouse steaks

Byline: by Steven A. Shaw

Steakhouses offer a uniquely masochistic experience: Customers are herded

through their meals like the cattle they're eating, side dishes are uniform

and dull, overcooking is pervasive, wine service -- if any -- can be

amateurish, and a reservation typically means go wait at the bar. Still,

everybody knows that steakhouses serve the best steaks.

Or do they? For those who want beef without attitude, here's some good news:

You no longer need to set foot in a steakhouse to get a great steak. Herein,

ten great non-steakhouse restaurants that happen to serve world-class

steaks.

Sub-Hed: Porterhouse: King of Steaks

The porterhouse is the king of steaks -- that's what you get at Peter

Luger -- in part because it's all things to all people. Take a look at a

porterhouse, named for the beer halls that popularized this cut, and you'll

see two distinct pieces of meat on either side of a T-shaped bone. The

larger piece, if butchered out separately, would be what is known as the

sirloin strip, also (and more accurately) known as a shell steak, New York

strip, Kansas City strip, strip-loin, or just plain strip. It's firm, with a

deep beefy flavor. The smaller piece, taken alone, is commonly called the

filet, or filet mignon (a slice of the tenderloin). It's buttery tender,

though with less steak flavor than the strip (which is in part why the filet

mignon is not a connoisseur's preferred cut).

Most steakhouse steaks are grilled (with heat from underneath) or broiled

(from above) at aggressive temperatures in order to achieve a charred

exterior and rare interior. That's why the porterhouse at Craft (43 E. 19th

St., 780-0880), Tom Colicchio's new restaurant (he is also chef/co-owner of

Gramercy Tavern) centered around artisanal ingredients, is such a

revelation: It's roasted very slowly, at gentle temperatures, in a pan.

Colicchio gives the steak a quick sear on the stovetop to achieve a medium

crust, then he puts it in the oven -- pan and all -- to finish. "Food

develops its flavors best when you cook it slowly," he argues. "The trick

with steak is to strike a balance between slow cooking and keeping the meat

rare in the center." Working closely with veteran supplier Ed Jobagy,

Colicchio acquires the best available 28-day dry-aged beef and cuts it

in-house to approximately 2 ½ inches thickness. In keeping with Craft's

minimalist philosophy, it's served only with a simple bordelaise (red

wine-based) sauce.

The porterhouse's one big drawback is that the strip and filet sides by

their nature rarely achieve doneness at the same time. Sam De Marco solves

this problem at his new District (130 W. 46th St., 485-2999), in the Muse

Hotel, by pulling the steak off the grill midway through cooking. Then, he

cuts out the filet portion and puts the strip back on the grill to finish.

He serves his 42-ounce, 21-day dry-aged porterhouses, from Gachog & Gachog,

with seasonal wild mushroom fondue (an incredibly rich mixture of mushrooms,

brown stock, Madeira and shallots), fried potato wedges, lightly dressed

greens, and grilled red onions. "And I use a healthy amount of fleur de sel

[premium hand-harvested sea salt from Brittany]," he says unapologetically.

"To me the right amount of salt is the key to great steak." The porterhouse

is available on Saturday nights at District (on other nights there's an

equally good strip) as well as at De Marco's two other restaurants: Merge

(142 W. 10th St., 691-7757, also Saturday only) and First (87 First Ave.,

674-3823).

Thanks to a longstanding personal relationship with his meat purveyor,

Sergio Bitici of Macelleria (48 Gansevoort St., 741-2555) offers

porterhouses on par with those at any steakhouse, dry-aged for 30 days,

broiled and served with a choice of either traditional steakhouse sides like

spinach, roasted potatoes, hash browns, or more Italian-influenced ones (the

name of the restaurant means butcher shop in Italian) including grilled

market mushrooms with truffle oil, broccoli rape, and Tuscan beans. Plus,

the full Italian menu makes Macelleria a great choice for mixed groups of

steak- and non-steak-eaters -- and the same goes for every restaurant listed

here.

Sub-Hed: Stripping Down

What the porterhouse offers in its diversity and sheer bulk, the strip -- as

served at steakhouses such as Sparks -- makes up for in its purity. Taken

alone, it's the piece of meat that serious steak lovers most often crave.

And few chefs are more serious about steak than Henry Meer of City Hall (131

Duane Street, 227-7777), who has even gone so far as to install his own

custom dry-aging facility on the premises. Working with third generation

butchers Pat Lafreda & Sons (Meer's supplier of choice for nearly a decade),

Meer buys Western grain-fed beef and ages it for 21 days at exactly 36

degrees Fahrenheit. He cooks it in a steakhouse-style 1500-degree infrared

upright broiler made by Jade. "I prefer top-broiling," Meer explains,

"because when you grill from below the dripping fat often causes flare-ups,

and the meat burns instead of getting that nice caramel crust." After

cooking, he brushes the steaks with City Hall butter (which contains

Worcestershire sauce, lemon juice and Tabasco). City Hall also offers a rib

steak (served with Maytag blue cheese) and filet mignon.

At Wild Blue (1 World Trade Center, 524-7107), the overachieving sibling of

Windows on the World (Wild Blue offers an equally great 107th-floor view,

but lacks the tourist-trap elements), Michael Lomonaco buys only USDA Prime

beef aged 28 days (three weeks at the distributor's aging facility, and one

week at the restaurant), and he too favors the overhead broiler. He rubs his

22-ounce bone-in strips with olive oil, kosher salt and fresh ground pepper

before cooking, and serves them up with a red-wine-and-shallot sauce and

roasted marrow bones. "I cook and serve it on the bone," says Lomonaco,

"because the bone shields the steak and keeps it moist, giving a rich beefy

flavor."

Patroon (160 E. 46th St., 883-7373) is restaurateur Ken Aretsky's answer to

the 21 Club, and chef Craig Cupani cooks a steak worthy of the legacy. He

rubs his 25-day dry-aged Nebraska beef with kosher salt and cracked black

pepper and cooks it on a gas-fired grill with hickory chips added for

flavor. Flareups don't worry him ("Not if you're careful"), and the wood

chips create a terrific smoky flavor. "Letting the meat rest is essential,"

he believes, "because it allows the juices time to recirculate and keeps

them from bleeding out when you cut into the steak." He pulls the steak off

the grill underdone and lets it stand for ten minutes before refiring it

just before serving. Patroon's steaks come with garlic roasted Yukon gold

potatoes, and jumbo asparagus is the side order of choice. Patroon also

offers a double-cut rib steak for two, carved tableside.

Sub-Hed: A Good Ribbing

While the major steakhouse steaks -- porterhouse, strip, filet -- all come

from the short loin part of the hindquarter of the steer (the best steaks

come from steers, not cows), more and more aficionados are beginning to

recognize the excellence of a totally different cut: the rib, from the

forequarter. Because rib steaks are heavily laced with fat, they're

virtually self-basting and tend to offer an ideal combination of flavor and

tenderness. And because they're less in demand than porterhouses, it's

easier for chefs to get good ones.

Smith & Wollensky has long been known for its excellent rib steaks (and for

being loud, cramped and uncomfortable). But the exact same piece of meat is

cooked, and cooked better, at Park Avenue Café (100 E. 63rd St., 644-1900),

which is part of Alan Stillman's Smith & Wollensky restaurant group. Chef de

cuisine Neil Murphy ages his meat for between 21 and 26 days and cooks it on

a gas-fired lava-rock grill. During cooking, he brushes the steaks with a

mixture of olive oil, English mustard powder, roasted garlic puree and

paprika, and serves the steak garnished with onion rings.

Jonathan Rapp of tiny Etats-Unis (242 E. 81st St., 517-8826) gets his beef

from Colonial Market and does his own aging in a small refrigerator for

about a month. He grills thick steaks-for-two over live charcoal, using a

low flame to avoid flare-ups, and midway through cooking he adds salt and

brushes the meat with a mixture of rosemary, thyme, garlic and olive oil.

The inimitable Etats-Unis steak -- which is available only a couple of days

a month (you may just have to dine at Etats-Unis a couple of dozen times

before you get a steak; a win-win situation if ever there was one) -- is

served with a sauce of reduced balsamic vinegar and freshly ground black

pepper.

Sub-Hed: Côte Check

When butchered and served French-style, the rib cut is also known as côte de

boeuf (super-thick, it falls conceptually somewhere between a steak and a

roast), and it takes a most imposing form at Atlas (40 Central Park South,

759-9191). Chef Paul Liebrandt buys 31-day dry-aged Black Angus beef and

marinates each côte for three days in French olive oil, Sichuan peppercorns,

garlic, rosemary, and green tea leaves (tea is a natural tenderizer, often

used in Asian cooking). He sears them on both sides in a heavy-bottomed pan

and then roasts them gently for about 45 minutes. "I like to cook it very,

very slowly," says Liebrandt, "so it gets a beautiful pink color and keeps

all its flavor." The finished product is presented whole at the table and

then carved and served with shiso (a Japanese herb reminiscent of mint and

basil), almonds, and French wild asparagus.

Kerry Heffernan of Eleven Madison Park (11 Madison Ave., 889-0905) also opts

for pan-roasting, and during cooking he bastes his 40-ounce 21-day dry-aged

beef with rosemary and butter. It's served with a potato-fennel gratin,

Swiss chard, garlic, and a touch of bordelaise, and the tableside carving

ritual builds almost unbearable anticipation. "A lot of times," reports

Heffernan, "people fight for the bone."

Sidebar: Steakhouse World Tour

American Western grain-fed beef, served in big steakhouse-style cuts, is one

of the world's great meat rituals, but many other nations can lay claim to

superlative beef traditions. The free-range grass-fed beef from the pampas

(plains) of Argentina, which is lower in fat than American beef and is not

aged, can be sampled (along with spicy parsley-and-garlic chimichurri sauce,

of course) at Chimichurri Grill (606 Ninth Ave., 586-8655) and Novecento

(343 West Broadway, 925-4706). Kobe beef -- the ultra-tender, heavily

marbled, super-expensive Japanese delicacy from highly pampered cattle -- is

available in a traditional presentation at Otabe (68 E. 56th St., 223-7575)

and Seryna (11 E. 53rd St., 980-9393), and also in a more modern setting at

Tao (42 E. 58th St., 888-2288). At Tappo (403 E. 12th St., 505-0001),

Filippo Paolini (formerly of Il Buco) uses American beef (25-day dry-aged

Nebraska sirloin, similar to Patroon's) but gives it an Italian twist by

marinating it for 24-hours in herb-and-garlic-infused extra virgin olive oil

before firing it on a charcoal grill and serving with rice, lemon-dressed

baby arugula salad, and shaved parmesan. Meanwhile, Christos Hasapo-Taverna

(41-08 23rd Ave., Astoria, Queens, 718-726-5195), which also starts with

American beef, honors the Greek tradition of pairing a butcher shop and a

restaurant; the Greek side dishes are a refreshing change, plus you can stop

at the butcher counter and grab a few steaks to take home on the way out.

Service box: Unless otherwise noted, all area codes are 212.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Thanks. Except that it made me so hungry.

I notice you mentioned Macellaria. I ate there a few times when I worked nearby, and thought the food excellent. The service was, alas, quite another story. It had so much less hype than the other places nearby (Pastis, the late Chinghalle, Rhone, Menu, etc.), but to my taste served better food. Is it still extant?

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After all those insightful posts I feel silly asking this but over the weekend I cooked porkchops here in Britain for the first time and the cut here comes with the nice fatty rind on it... so to make it nice and appealing I actually did the narrow fatty edge first (without having any clue that I was helping the fat into the pan and making it tastier)... but the cut wasn't thick enough to balance on its own so I held it.... getting splatters of oil on my hands and cursing all the while.

How do you keep the meat balanced on the narrow side without it falling over?

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Instead of a skillet, use a pot with tall enough sides -- like a saucier -- and lean it against the edge.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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but the cut wasn't thick enough to balance on its own so I held it.... getting splatters of oil on my hands and cursing all the while.

How do you keep the meat balanced on the narrow side without it falling over?

My husband places a skewer through the chops at the height of the frying pan, so the ends of the skewers rest on the edge of the pan. Balances the chops pretty well.

A few months back I used Ducasse's recipe that appeared in NYTimes. I made the spinach, and the marmalade also. The steak came out very well, though I would not leave it at room temp for ten minutes before serving as he advises. A little too long in the home kichen, maybe a restaurant kitchen is a lot warmer. He also suggests quite a lot of butter on the steak at the last minute--a good move, though I'd add slightly less in future. PS: After all that, making that marmalade from scratch etc., I asked my other half how he liked the meal. He said, "Really good, though I could've done without the fruit and vegetables".

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My husband places a skewer through the chops at the height of the frying pan, so the ends of the skewers rest on the edge of the pan.
How does one reconcile this with Ducasse's instructions never to turn the meat over with a fork because the hole will leak out more of the natural juices?

John Whiting, London

Whitings Writings

Top Google/MSN hit for Paris Bistros

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Tongs.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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