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Moopheus

What are we having for dessert?

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What did we have for dessert today? Did you make it, buy it in a store, get it after dinner at a restaurant or in a cafe? Was it good? Tasty? Interesting? Satisfying?

After reading through the "making and eating desserts" thread I thought it would be interesting to take a cross-the-board state-of-the-dessert survey.

My dessert tonight was pretty pedestrian--some chocolates from a tray of Ferrero Rocher hazelnut chocolates. One of those gift assortments, and it was in fact a gift. It wasn't especially satisfying, not terrible. We ate them.

I hope somebody had better.

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What did we have for dessert today? Did you make it, buy it in a store, get it after dinner at a restaurant or in a cafe? Was it good? Tasty? Interesting? Satisfying?

So funny you should ask... I made my first souffle today!

Procedure went pretty smoothly, I've made custards and meringues before, this is just folding the 2 together.

It came out all right for a first try, classic chocolate souffle. COulda been more chocolatey, and I'm sure I still didn't cook it long enough. But not bad for a first try...

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This is my kind of thread.

An almond truffle from Godiva and some Valentine colored peanut M&M's

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Blovie and I went out to dinner tonight. I had orange infused beignets (3), banana and pineapple fritters (2 of each) with pineapple sorbet. The plate was dressed with raspberry, strawberry and kiwi sauce. It was yummy.

Blovie had a molten chocolate cake. He ate it too quickly for me to sample.

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Tonight my girlfriend and i had orange sements & Cucumber with sweet and sour chili poweder. Not a traditional dessert but very tasty, a great mexican treat during the summer.

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Rhubarb and strawberry crumble. I only make it in the winter when it's cold enough outside to turn on the oven!

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This is my kind of thread.

An almond truffle from Godiva and some Valentine colored peanut M&M's

I don't generally eat dessert, but I'm still eating the Christmas coloured peanut m&m's!

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I have just returned from visiting family in the United Arab Emirates. After thirty hours of travelling, I fell into bed a few hours ago with the four-kilo tin of basboussa, nammoura, and baklava I brought back with me.

The butter keeps me sated, the sugar makes me happy, the nuts make me strong like an ox.

Bliss.

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We had the Chocolate Lover's Angel Food Cake from The Cake Bible with a dollop of Nutella and whipped cream. It was very nice. It was not pretty, but the cake was very moist. Usually angel food cakes are on the dry side.

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We are eating the three gingerbread houses we made before Xmas. This could be several evenings' dessert.

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Tonight my girlfriend and i had orange sements & Cucumber with sweet and sour chili poweder.  Not a traditional dessert but very tasty, a great mexican treat during the summer.

Is "sweet and sour chile powder" anything like "hot ham"?

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I made chocolate mousse tonight., It was good. I hadn't done that in a long time. The other night I had a hazelnut velvet cake at a restaurant--hazelnut cake, chocolate mousse filling, buttercream frosting, which was pretty good but my mousse was better than what was in the cake. The filling was very dense and not as chocolatey.

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We're making cream puffs filled with Chocolate Mousse and dusted with powdered sugar. MMMM :smile:

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I had 4 chocolates from an 32 count assorted box purchased at Sen5es in Vancouver, BC. They are small, so I actually thought I used some will power eating only 4.

2 of them I couldn't distingish their flavor (semi-sweet ganche/semi sweet coating), the 3rd was not to my liking-it had a savory Indian taste, but lucky enough the last one was my favorite out of the box, to date. It was a white chocolate ganche, thin layer of lemon coated in semi-sweet choc..

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I braved the freezing cold weather tonight and had dinner with a friend tonight. Afterward, we treated ourselves to a little "snack" at a local dessert place. I had a chocolate cupcake with chocolate-orange buttercream with a cafe au lait. The cupcake was little but hit the spot. The orange in the buttercream was suprising. I figured it was just chocolate.

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I had a lovely dessert yesterday for lunch at NoMI here in Chicago. It was a warm chocolate soup infused with cinnamon and vanilla topped with a bit of melting coconut "curd" (basically coconut milk cooked with sugar, egg yolks and butter like a lemon curd). It was served with a deconstructed linzer "tart" which consisted of halved fresh raspberries, a sprinkling of crunchy, spicy struesel powder and a quenelle of chocolate cream. The soup was rich, but not very sweet, with a very complex and subtle flavor which brought out some floral notes from the coconut. The "tart" was refreshing and a nice complement to the soup, though the chocolate cream was a bit on the too rich side.

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I just bought some pears for poaching. I'll probably add whole spices while poaching (cinnamon, allspice, lemon zest). I usually do it in wine rather than sugar syrup.

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My first attempt at chocolate cheesecake I am trying out for a chocolate competition next month. Lots of components. chocolate crumb crust, ganache, chocolate cheesecake with a carmel swirl and candied pecans in maple syrup on the outside adhered with carmel. Been super busy in the past month, but getting back to this forum. All the desserts sound wonderful!

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Cook's Illustrated Double Chocolate Pudding, made with Callebaut and Schokinag cocoa, rather than the usual Manjari and Valronha cocoa. Not as good, but still wonderful. My daughter had two.

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I had a lovely dessert yesterday for lunch at NoMI here in Chicago. It was a warm chocolate soup infused with cinnamon and vanilla topped with a bit of melting coconut "curd" (basically coconut milk cooked with sugar, egg yolks and butter like a lemon curd). It was served with a deconstructed linzer "tart" which consisted of halved fresh raspberries, a sprinkling of crunchy, spicy struesel powder and a quenelle of chocolate cream. The soup was rich, but not very sweet, with a very complex and subtle flavor which brought out some floral notes from the coconut. The "tart" was refreshing and a nice complement to the soup, though the chocolate cream was a bit on the too rich side.

Absolutely no fair! Did you get to meet Kriss? (And did you eat some savories to go with that?)

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Rich looking devil's food cake from Mother's Bistro that I haven't tucked into yet, but I had to get a piece to go because it looked sooo good. Still stuffed from dinner. (Review in Pacific NW)

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