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Fresh Parsley


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If you chop up parsley with Garlic and lemon zest, and serve it over seafood, it's a particularly French thing that Jacques Pepin does a lot on his shows which I forgot the name of.

that's very similar (if not identical) to gremolata, which I make when I make ossobuco.

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If you chop up parsley with Garlic and lemon zest, and serve it over seafood, it's a particularly French thing that Jacques Pepin does a lot on his shows which I forgot the name of.

That's the same thing as a gremolata. I like to use it to finish off Osso Buco or other braises. I'll have to try it on seafood. Sounds good.

eta: Chufi beat me to it, I guess I'm too slow on the draw today...

Edited by TongoRad (log)

aka Michael

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I don't always add mint to my tabouli. It kind of depends upon the quality of parsley that I have and the availability of mint. For some stupid reason, we have had trouble growing mint at my sister's house. At any rate, I find that the mint can quickly overrun the parsley so I use it sparingly when I do.

The parsley/lemon/garlic combo seems to be pervasive. I wonder if it originated in the near east with the traditional taboulis and got transferred into the parsley sauces of French cuisine.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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If you chop up parsley with Garlic and lemon zest, and serve it over seafood, it's a particularly French thing that Jacques Pepin does a lot on his shows which I forgot the name of.

that's very similar (if not identical) to gremolata, which I make when I make ossobuco.

I think he may add herbs de provence to it, though. Yeah, I was thinking of the Osso Bucco stuff that is served with the risotto milanese (saffron risotto).

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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If you chop up parsley with Garlic and lemon zest, and serve it over seafood, it's a particularly French thing that Jacques Pepin does a lot on his shows which I forgot the name of.

....

persillade...

I recently made a great parsley soup and discussed the recipe and dish here in the 52 Weeks of Soups thread.

Other than taboulleh salads, I've also made straight parsley salads with a mustardy vinagrette containing shallots, capers, Dijon mustard, lemon juice and olive oil.

Also--I like a nice parsley vingagrette over slice tomatoes... or I've made a parsley or a parsely/thyme pesto and stuffed it into chicken breasts before grilling them.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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If you chop up parsley with Garlic and lemon zest, and serve it over seafood, it's a particularly French thing that Jacques Pepin does a lot on his shows which I forgot the name of.

....

persillade...

Yup, Persillade, thats right. When you add Lemon Zest it becomes Gremolata. I think Pepin adds something else though, although I might be mistaken.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Like others, I do not think that you can make much of a meal out of parsley, but there are plenty of things that you can do to use the flavor and color. It is easy and fun to fry it. Simply heat oil to 350-375 throw in the leaves (make sure they are dry), fry them for only about 10 seconds, and then season them with some fine sea salt as they are hot. I also like to make parsley oil, fill a blender with parsley, and a nuetral oil, whiz, strain. I have also made a parslay sauce for fish. There is not much more to it than pureed parslay, fish stock, cream, and butter.

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I know I have made parsley sauce for salt cod, which is common in Spanish and Portuguese cuisine. I think I may have gotten it out of one of Penelope Casas's books.

Edited by mikeycook (log)

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If you chop up parsley with Garlic and lemon zest, and serve it over seafood, it's a particularly French thing that Jacques Pepin does a lot on his shows which I forgot the name of.

....

persillade...

Yup, Persillade, thats right. When you add Lemon Zest it becomes Gremolata. I think Pepin adds something else though, although I might be mistaken.

bread crumbs?

does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

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Duh! How could I have forgotten about chimichurri? We have a restaurant here, Churrasco's, that serves steak with chimichurri as their signature dish. It is so good.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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By coincidence, there is an article in today's SF Chronicle discussing the use of parsley as a main ingredient. Included are recipes for parsley ravioli, fried parsley, and Burmese-style parsley salad.

that is a coincidence! thanks for the link. "prezzemolo in abbodanza"... that sounds so lovely.

The parsley ravioli is on my list of things to try soon.

Edited by Chufi (log)
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First things that came to mind were the aforementioned tabbouli and chimichurri.

I also make parsley soup, with leeks, a vegetable stock, and a potato as thickener. It really highlights the delicate flavor of the herb, which I find is heightened by a squeeze of lemon.

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Another parsley salad: shaved fennel bulb on the plate, then whole parsley leaves on top, then shaved parmigiano reggiano, then EVOO, lemon, salt, and pepper. Poifect.

One other thing. Fergus Henderson encourages us to revisit curly parsley, which he believes has a stronger flavor. Bad rap from too many garnishes....

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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And what about salmoriglio?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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And what about salmoriglio?

How very strange that this recipe would omit parsley! But then, in Sicily the oregano is usually fresh and wild and full of flavour.

One of my favourites is Pescespada alla Messinese, charcoal grilled swordfish served swimming in salmoriglio.

Further North, in Tuscany, we always add plenty of fresh parsley to this sauce - no doubt the flavour of dried oregano is just not the same as in Sicily.

Here in India I often use salmoriglio to dress room temperature boiled potatoes, which proves very popular among our vegetarian Indian friends.

And in Buenos Aires, all I have to do is add red chili flakes to turn it into chimichurri!

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And what about salmoriglio?

How very strange that this recipe would omit parsley! But then, in Sicily the oregano is usually fresh and wild and full of flavour.

One of my favourites is Pescespada alla Messinese, charcoal grilled swordfish served swimming in salmoriglio.

Further North, in Tuscany, we always add plenty of fresh parsley to this sauce - no doubt the flavour of dried oregano is just not the same as in Sicily.

...

Oh, I didn't mean it as a 'counter example'; on the bottom of the recipe it says that another common variation is parsley instead of oregano...

Thanks for the posts; I had never heard of salmoriglio before by name.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Has anyone made parsley kimchi or some other kind of parsley pickles?

I don't think parsley would hold up well but I have used kimchi juices with parsley in a salad involving blanched white onion strips and salt cod.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Has anyone made parsley kimchi or some other kind of parsley pickles?

There's a range of kimchi's made from greens/herbs. Some of the preparations could work for parsley. If anyone is interested I can come up with some suggestions.

Edited by touaregsand (log)
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