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Craig Camp

Michelin Finally Awards 3 Star in Italy

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Maremma and Ducasse - a match made in heaven (or at least in La Borsa). Parmalat officials said to be upset by the unfortunate timing (for them).

Ducasse has teamed up with industrialist Vittorio Moretti, owner of Italy's Bellavista winery, to create a country villa in southwest Tuscany, in the Maremma region along the Mediterranean coast.

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I find it surprising that the Brits should have gotten a 3-star before Italy. I suspect it is because ultimately Michelin believes that the best food is French food and the Italians, unlike the Brits, have a distinguished cuisine of their own that has no need to important much from their northwestern neighbors.

Perhaps the Michelin recognition reflects however tentatively the decline of cuisine chauvinism with the rise of the European Union.

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Why is Parmalat upset?

Although it dominates the Italian press, there is very little about in the U.S. press.

and a belated "buon anno' to you!

Because they won't be able to eat there while they are in jail.

Parmalat is not being covered well in the USA?

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Why is Parmalat upset?

Although it dominates the Italian press, there is very little about in the U.S. press.

and a belated "buon anno' to you!

Because they won't be able to eat there while they are in jail.

Parmalat is not being covered well in the USA?

Parmalat is certainly being well covered here in the US. "Europe's Enron" is the current quote. Why is Guide Michelin waiting so long to award stars in the US? Is it any more surprising than Italy, Germany or England?


Mark

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I'm not sure as to who was first and its relevence, but about 10 or 15 years ago Gualtiero Marchesi (spell?) in Milan had 3 stars.


"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Why is Guide Michelin waiting so long to award stars in the US?

The Michelin Guide is a money loosing venture. Obviously they don't feel strongly tempted to enlarge the scope of the Guides to other continents.

Does Michelin sell tyres in the US? Market share?


Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler.

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Big confusion here, I see. What's this three-star caper? Ducasse's future venture hasn't got any stars, nor does it appear in the Michelin guide, because of course it isn't open yet! And Italy, as mentioned before, has had three-star restaurants for a long time, Gualtiero Marchesi's original restaurant in Milan being the first one... 19 years ago!

(Marchesi had been for several years a sous-chef for Troisgros in Roanne before opening his place in Milan in 1977. He has always been heavily influenced by France. His choice only furthered the suspicion that Michelin was heavily Franco-centric in every country it covered.)

In the 2004 edition of the Michelin Guide to Italy there are four restaurants with three stars (same number as in Spain), with Florence's Enoteca Pinchiorri this year moving up from two stars to join Le Calandre of Rubano, Al Sorriso of Soriso and Dal Pescatore of Canneto sull'Oglio. There are 20 restaurants with two stars in Italy.


Edited by vserna (log)

Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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Italy, outside France, is probably the one country that Michelin treats best. IMHO.


Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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Italy, outside France, is probably the one country that Michelin treats best. IMHO.

You're right. Pitiful isn't it? However this does not make the Italians any happier.

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I find it surprising that the Brits should have gotten a 3-star before Italy.

I don't want to de-rail this thread, but Michelin awards stars to individual restaurants and the simple truth is that there are world class chefs working in London and the UK and have been for some time now. The most amazing thing is that the only 3 star chef in London at the moment hails from Glasgow, home of the deep fried pizza!

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For the record: the UK got its fiirst three stars (Le Gavroche, London) in 1982, three years earlier than Italy with Gualtiero Marchesi. Of course the Roux brothers were French-born, while Marchesi was merely French-trained... :blink:

An interesting link to British foodie chronology...

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/foodmonthly...1078123,00.html

Spain only received its first three-star mention in 1987, to Madrid's Zalacain. Like Le Gavroche's and Gualtiero Marchesi's, these three stars are now just a memory.


Edited by vserna (log)

Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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This is great. It's like arguing baseball statistics with your buddies in a bar. Where else can you do this but eGullet!

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Does Michelin sell tyres in the US? Market share?

Definitely. I have no idea about their market share, but their "you have a lot riding on your tires" ads, featuring babies, are legendary in this country.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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