Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cooking with Duck Fat: The Topic


FoodMan
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've used duck fat in pastry, but as it's very soft at room temperature it makes a really tender crust without a lot of structure. It's better to use part butter, part duck fat, if you want that added ducky flavor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a recipe for chocolate and walnut chip cookies using duck fat...

I render my own lard to use in lots of baking (gingersnaps, griddle cakes and scones etc) I should think you could try using it in any of those recipes...

griddle cakes (singin' hinnies, welsh cakes and tattie scones) are gorgeous using lard. also Scottish Aberdeen butteries (a shorter, Scottish take on a croissant) are traditionally made with lard, despite the name as butter would ruin the texture.

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pan fried sliced potatoes are excellent in duck fat. Thinner is better, and crisps or chips best .

Try pan fried french fries.

Oven roasted vegetables are nicely colored and decadent-tasting in duck fat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last xmas I was lucky enough to collect the fat from three roast geese. I cooked one for friends, and my mom cooked two for xmas dinner. I used it to make confit a couple of times of course, but also just as my everyday cooking fat replacing OO. I loved it. My wife started to dislike everything having a goosey undertone to it though. The best by far was roast veggies. Inch sized cubes of beets, parsnips, yams, potatoes ... whatever, they are way better with goose fat than with veggie oils.

I'm thinking of hosting some friends for a big goose feast, just so that I have the fat again. It was glorious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Various treatments of potatoes are the most common uses of rendered duck fat, and that's always a good choice.

I have also found it to be very felicitous in combination with beef. I have my doubts as to whether "marinating in duck fat" has any particular benefit, especially if the beef is grilled. On the other hand, I have found that using duck fat when preparing beef in a hot pan (either entirely pan-fried or finished in the oven) makes a big difference. Ironically, the steak seems to come out "beefier" this way, rather than with much identifiable duck flavor.

It's also hard to put a foot wrong by using a little duck fat when browing poultry. I like to use a bit of duck fat in the pan when I do pan-fried and oven-roasted spatchcocked chicken or squab.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great for roast potatoes. Boil them for a few minutes first to cook the outside a little. Toss them in a colander to rough up the surface. Sprinkle them with a little semolina then roast in duck fat. (The semolina neutralises the calories ;-) and makes the spuds crispy). Maybe I lied about the calories...

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a bird hunter, primarily pheasants. Most of my fellow pheasant hunters just breast the bird and toss the rest, the wings and legs are very tough.

A few years back I tried to confit some of the leg/thigh pieces, I used a couple of the D'Artagnan containers of duck fat mixed in with rendered pork fat. I was pleased with the results. The meat was nutty and falling off the bone.

Two year ago I saved about 20 leg/thigh joints and bought my duck fat from Hudson Valley Fois Gras.

I live within a couple hundred miles so I was able to get a 7.5lb. tub, about 1 gal., of rendered duck fat UPS'd to me overnight for about $35.00. The confit turned out good, perhaps a little bland to my taste. I used the method from Polcyn & Ruhlman's "Charcuterie". Ikept it coverd in the fat for about 5 month in the back of the fridge after drawing off the clear juices from the bottom.

After it was all gone I strained the fat back into the tub and put it in the deep freeze. Last night it was time to confit last years kill, approximately 12 lbs of pheasant legs/ thighs, close to 35 pieces. This time I used a little more spice and used last years fat. I have some pics to post and will do it in a separate thread.

I can't recommend Hudson Valley Fois Gras highly enough, quality products at a reasonable cost, and the fat was much more flavorful than the smaller containers.

My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income.

- Errol Flynn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try using duck or goose fat instead of lard when making refried beans.

Delicious.

For many other uses try to get a copy of Strang's cook book "Goose Fat & Garlic" Wonderful recipes from the South West of France along with quite a lot of interesting cultural history. For a real treat try the recipe for Alliade de Toulouse and serve it with duck breast (magret)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 6 years later...

I eat a lot of duck. In many guises.

 

And I always render the fat and, where necessary, clarify it. It then sits in my fridge and lasts apparently forever.

 

I often use it for potatoes, obviously. And a bit less often for duck confit. 

 

Any other duck fat usage suggestions?

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

biscuits (the savory bread type, not British cookies), pate choux -then make cream puffs and stuff with savory sandwich things, pate choux -then duchess potatoes, roasting vegetables in general, popcorn, mayonnaise, hollandaise, crackers, laminated dough like croissant or danish dough, pie crust -then make a duck pot pie, roux for sauces and some soups,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I let freshly rendered duck fat sit out and it separates into a liquid portion and a solid portion. I pour the liquid portion into a bottle with a pour spout and use it as a replacement for vegetable oil. I put the solid portion in a container in the fridge and use it for deep frying.

  • Like 1

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use it to fry eggs.  It complements the egg better than bacon fat.  Not just good for breakfast eggs, but especially nice to have a duck fat fried egg atop fresh asparagus.  When I can get quail eggs, I also fry in duck fat and serve over slices of baguettes with a bit of serrano ham.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Host's note: the term 'new discussion' refers to a second topic, which has since been merged with the original.

 

 

And this new discussion brings me to a question: How might duck fat work instead of schmaltz when making a traditional chopped liver dish (using chicken livers)?  Seems like it should be just fine.  Anyone tried it? 

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And this new discussion brings me to a question: How might duck fat work instead of schmaltz when making a traditional chopped liver dish (using chicken livers)?  Seems like it should be just fine.  Anyone tried it? 

 

I use chicken fat for making chicken katsu (ala Ivan Ramen) and it's really nice, I would suspect doing the same with duck fat and anything would add a new dimension on, well, anything cooked with it.

 

Unfortunatly, unless I manage to get my hands on actual duck, finding duck fat where I live is a real pain in the butt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

I have almost 2 cups of duck fat on hand.  

 

I'd like to use it creatively and wondering if anyone has any ideas for me.

 

I have it my head to use it as a poaching medium for seafood (shrimp or salmon or ??) along the lines of poaching lobster in butter, but I'm not sure if that's a good/great/awful idea.  

 

PS: I have been slathering the duck fat on corn on the cob, then grilling them and it's been a big hit, but I'd like a recipe that is either a substantial appetizer/small plate or even a main course.  Not looking for anything flash-fried, something more subtle and creative.

 

TIA.

Edited by gulfporter (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My immediate thinking went to a riff on rillettes using chicken or turkey thigh and using them as the fatty protein in a take on the well known Momofuku pork buns and utilizing quick pickles of summer bounty as the acid/bright note

 

This caught my eye but I think the key again is the sweet/acidic counterplay of the relish (duckfat poached swordfish -though salmon seems like a good option - scroll down)  https://www.zagat.com/b/duck-trend-piece#1

Edited by heidih (log)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My immediate thinking went to a riff on rillettes using chicken or turkey thigh and using them as the fatty protein in a take on the well known Momofuku pork buns and utilizing quick pickles of summer bounty as the acid/bright note

 

This caught my eye but I think the key again is the sweet/acidic counterplay of the relish (duckfat poached swordfish -though salmon seems like a good option - scroll down)  https://www.zagat.com/b/duck-trend-piece#1

The duck fat poached fish looks great, sounds great.....but no recipe (sigh).  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would also work well in pate a choux, you can then make cream puff shapes and use them as buns for small sandwiches. You could also use it as the fat in a cracker recipe. Then, there's the world of sauces, like warm sauces where you could use it as the fat in roux, and cold sauces, mayonnaise in particular.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would also work well in pate a choux, you can then make cream puff shapes and use them as buns for small sandwiches. You could also use it as the fat in a cracker recipe. Then, there's the world of sauces, like warm sauces where you could use it as the fat in roux, and cold sauces, mayonnaise in particular.

 

Mayonnaise made with duck fat is awesome.  To go along with the OP's fish tendencies, I've used duck fat mayo as a binder in fish cakes.  It gives them a deep savory note that people love but cannot pinpoint.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Rushina
      What would you like to be included in a cookbook you classify as a "good cookbook"?
      Rushina
    • By Multiwagon
      Other than the three written by Michael Ruhlman, which I have read and loved, what other books are out there that are about cooking, but not cookbooks?
    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
    • By mixmaster b
      I am interested in getting some cookbooks that cover the basics of pastry and baking--not bread, necessarily, but dessert, cakes, cookies, etc. I searched a few other cookbook threads but did not have luck on finding books on pastry.
      My interest is in fairly classic French and European style baking, and I need a book that covers technique. Pictures would also be much appreciated--I like both the step by step pix or great pictures of the end product.
      Right now, I have Desserts and Chocolate Desserts by Pierre Herme. (I love these and have had good results from the recipes, but feel I should start with a more classic approach.) La Varenne Pratique has provided some good starting points, but I would like to find a book with more focus on baking.
      I was thinking about the Payard book. Any comments? Suggestions would be much appreciated! In case it applies, I am a home cook and am slightly more skilled than a total beginner.
      Thanks!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...