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Cooking with Duck Fat: The Topic


FoodMan
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Haven't used duck fat myself, as the tinned stuff is pretty expensive and I can't say I've roasted a duck recently. Of course, buying duck confit should give a decent supply of duck fat as well... I do know that chips cooked in duck fat at Comptoir Gascon in London are top notch.

I have, however, got a plentiful supply of goose fat, having cooked a goose for Christmas the last couple of years - it's similarly good for frying just about anything, but especially steaks and such.

PS

Edinburgh

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Duck fat is "free" if you're willing to do a bit of work. Buy 2 whole ducks, carve out the breasts and the legs render the trimmings and roast all the bones in the oven until well browned.

It's really not that much work, either. Most of the time you are breaking down the duck for one reason or another, and if you grab all the skin and fat and use this method, you can get enough fat from a duck to confit the legs. I haven't bought any duck fat in my life.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I make some tasty hambergers with a mix of sirloin and the steak that sits on top of the prime rib (is that flat iron?), both are cut in small brunoise with a knife. Since both meats are rather lean, I add a little duck fat (not too much as it would overpower the beef) and lube the meat with it. Salt and pepper, thats all. It makes a wonderfull burger!!

Edited by Pielle (log)
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I like to do what I call a 4 duck weekend once in a while. Buy 4 whole ducks, 8 confit legs and thighs, 8 breasts (that can also be confited) , a bunch of fat, a gallon of stock (add two trotters) and some pate`. Good eating for months for the two of us.

Duck fat is "free" if you're willing to do a bit of work. Buy 2 whole ducks, carve out the breasts and the legs render the trimmings and roast all the bones in the oven until well browned. You should get about a pint of duck fat from the trimmings and bones combined. You can then make a stock out of the bones and confit the legs with the rendered duck fat. Once you use up the confitted legs, you have a pint of wonderful, aromatic duck fat to use for cooking. Due to the economics of the situation, 2 whole ducks actually end up costing less than 4 duck breasts and with just a couple of hours of work, you not only get the 4 breasts, you get 4 confit legs, a pint of duck fat, a wonderful duck noodle soup from the broth and a duck gizzard & crackling salad.

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I always loved duck, but I'm pretty much a newbie when it comes to anything else than the chinese roast duck. I love it mostly because of the skin and *surprise* the luscious fat. And there is a HUGE amount of fat in duck. I just never thought to actually use it in cooking

How is duck stock compared to chicken stock? How is the price of a whole duck compared to a chicken? I'm getting the feeling that duck seems almost superior to anything involving chicken if one has the money.

Edited by takadi (log)
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Duck fat is "free" if you're willing to do a bit of work. Buy 2 whole ducks, carve out the breasts and the legs render the trimmings and roast all the bones in the oven until well browned.

It's really not that much work, either. Most of the time you are breaking down the duck for one reason or another, and if you grab all the skin and fat and use this method, you can get enough fat from a duck to confit the legs. I haven't bought any duck fat in my life.

Chris, I'm curious on the breeds you use. I find this to be true (in boatloads) with moulard, usually true with muscovy, but I am always a bit shy with your garden variety pekin. I have used a variant of the method years, and agree, it is the way to get wonderful, pristine fat. With pekin, though, I find I don't usually have enough to confit the legs. Not a big deal, I top with good olive oil, but I do miss the gallons of moulard I used to obtain.

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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I always loved duck, but I'm pretty much a newbie when it comes to anything else than the chinese roast duck. I love it mostly because of the skin and *surprise* the luscious fat. And there is a HUGE amount of fat in duck. I just never thought to actually use it in cooking

How is duck stock compared to chicken stock? How is the price of a whole duck compared to a chicken? I'm getting the feeling that duck seems almost superior to anything involving chicken if one has the money.

Supermarket ducks are generally more expensive than chickens, but as has been stated previously, you get a lot of bang for your investment. I too remove the breasts, legs and thighs. The breasts (skin on) I reserve for pan searing and I make confit from the legs and thighs. To do this I cut every scrap of skin and fat off of the carcass and render into duck fat which I then use to make the confit. After the confit is done the fat is then strained and put in the freezer for frying, etc. I generally cut up and roast the carcass for 20-30 minutes or so and then use it to make stock, which I find to be much richer, almost sweeter, than chicken stock.

Also, with reference to a previous post, I find goose fat very similar in taste and performance to duck.

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I have a large tub of duck fat left over from confit I made last November. Inspired by this thread, I rubbed a couple of supermarket Cornish hens with it before roasting at 450 degrees. Wow! They were great! I'll try this again next time I roast a chicken.

Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

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Chris, I'm curious on the breeds you use.  I find this to be true (in boatloads) with moulard, usually true with muscovy, but I am always a bit shy with your garden variety pekin.  I have used a variant of the method years, and agree, it is the way to get wonderful, pristine fat.  With pekin, though, I find I don't usually have enough to confit the legs.  Not a big deal, I top with good olive oil, but I do miss the gallons of moulard I used to obtain.

I have been consistently using Brome Lake ducks, which are pekin ducks and readily available at a local store (East Side Marketplace for those in RI). The good Lac Brome folks don't trim off extra fat and skin (mais oui) so there's always enough, if barely at times.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Thanks, Chris. You have also triggered me to hunt down (no pun intended) another guy here doing a great job with his pekins - big, beautiful ducks. We almost went with him, though I ultimately opted for muscovys from Christian Gasset, of Au Bon Canard (plug for Christian - a great guy, doing great work).

By the way, say hi to Providence! Used to walk the shadowy halls of Trinity Rep as a conservatory student...

Chris, I'm curious on the breeds you use.  I find this to be true (in boatloads) with moulard, usually true with muscovy, but I am always a bit shy with your garden variety pekin.  I have used a variant of the method years, and agree, it is the way to get wonderful, pristine fat.  With pekin, though, I find I don't usually have enough to confit the legs.  Not a big deal, I top with good olive oil, but I do miss the gallons of moulard I used to obtain.

I have been consistently using Brome Lake ducks, which are pekin ducks and readily available at a local store (East Side Marketplace for those in RI). The good Lac Brome folks don't trim off extra fat and skin (mais oui) so there's always enough, if barely at times.

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Try duck fat the next time you want to make popcorn.... ohmygod....

I keep a two to three pound tub around all time and use it constantly.

This sounds good. Do you use the duck fat to cook the pop corn, or use the duck fat after the corn is popped?

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  • 1 month later...

Where i am blessed to work I have the joy of doing the ordering for all the gourmet groceries and cheeses (yes! and they PAY me to do it! :biggrin: ) so I have seen duck fat all over in various periodicals, etc so I had to order it. And now I have to sell it....I have done some amazing potatoes in it my self and also chicken and roasted a whole turkey after liberally lubing said bird up with obscene amounts of duck fat. I will try confit soon but I need other uses for it for home cooks to try....Anyone have any suggestions? I need to move this and justify keeping it in stock. Also, please keep in mind, Nashville is not a real culinary mecca...keeping stuff simple really works here.

Ciao!

Mol

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Where i am blessed to work I have the joy of doing the ordering for all the gourmet groceries and cheeses (yes! and they PAY me to do it! :biggrin: ) so I have seen duck fat all over in various periodicals, etc so I had to order it.  And now I have to sell it....I have done some amazing potatoes in it my self and also chicken and roasted a whole turkey after liberally lubing said bird up with obscene amounts of duck fat.  I will try confit soon but I need other uses for it for home cooks to try....Anyone have any suggestions?  I need to move this and justify keeping it in stock.  Also, please keep in mind, Nashville is not a real culinary mecca...keeping stuff simple really works here. 

Ciao!

Mol

I have used duck fat as part of the fat in pie crust. Also, it is really good for sauteeing greens.

www.littlecomptonmornings.blogspot.com

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Great for roasting the spuds, as you say. Parboil them first then give them a quick roll in semolina before roasting :-) I've got a nice jar of the stuff in the fridge from rendering the fat from some duck breasts when I was cooking them the other night. Manna from heaven! I'll give some a go in my next savoury tart pastry as Janeer mentioned. Hey, otherwise I am virtuous in the kitchen... Well, most days.

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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Question from the newbie....where do I get some? Cook a duck keep the fat? In a grocery store (I have never seen any)?

Thanks! I love new products (new to me anyway... :blush: )

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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I love frying eggs in duck fat. They are great for providing the best flavor and crisping the whites for those who, like me, like their fried eggs that way. Grimaud Farms is a great source of pure duck fat via the internet. They are also a great source for duck if you wish to render your own fat. :wink:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Duck fat is now the only permissable pan lube for omelettes in my kitchen (Until goose season. Let me just tell you about wild Canada goose foie, if you shoot 'em off grain elevators way up North before they start their migration...).

This whole love/hate thing would be a lot easier if it was just hate.

Bring me your finest food, stuffed with your second finest!

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  • 1 year later...

By the looks of that picture, you just smeared the fat around it, then grilled it? Does the fat really help in flavor? I'd assume it would render right off from the very hot grill...

Unless you're using it as a fat barrier..but then again a strip steak shouldn't need it...

Curious, curious

Jim

Edit: Didn't see the post above me. A lot of times people don't use lard anymore because of the particular animal scent/aroma left behind from the fat, which gets transfered to the baked goods. Though it's mostly preference.

Edited by stealw (log)
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By the looks of that picture, you just smeared the fat around it, then grilled it? Does the fat really help in flavor? I'd assume it would render right off from the very hot grill...

Unless you're using it as a fat barrier..but then again a strip steak shouldn't need it...

Curious, curious

Jim

Edit: Didn't see the post above me. A lot of times people don't use lard anymore because of the particular animal scent/aroma left behind from the fat, which gets transfered to the baked goods. Though it's mostly preference.

I was looking more for the flavor to transfer, in my blog post I mentioned trying tenderloin next. we'll see what happens :)

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