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Lebanon Bologna


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Ah, the rewards of fatherhood.

Young ms. woodburner stole another piece of my heart, landing her sleigh on my doorstep last night totting a basket of Philly goodness.

Her and I just polished off a few nice sandwiches of Lebonan and sharp cheese on rye, Herr's chips, and a big piece of cheesecake.

Bless her little heart.

woodburner

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Is there a difference between Lebanon bologna and Trail bologna? And is it all the same as kosher bologna, like the Hebrew National kind?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Lebanon bologna is definitely different than regular bologna - it's got visible meat and fat chunks in it, and looks and feels more like summer sausage. It's also much smokier-tasting. Definitely does make a nice sandwich though.

Our local deli sections carry Kunzler's Lebanon bologna - there are pictures here, and you can get a little idea of the texture.

"Tea and cake or death! Tea and cake or death! Little Red Cookbook! Little Red Cookbook!" --Eddie Izzard
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Is there a difference between Lebanon bologna and Trail bologna? And is it all the same as kosher bologna, like the Hebrew National kind?

It's completely different-- Lebanon Bologna (they pronounce it bo-lo-na) is a strong, spicy sausage from the Pa. Dutch country-- There is also a Lebanon "Sweet" Bologna that has an unusual taste, and it is quite sweet and spicy!

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My understanding is that Lebanon bologna is an all-beef, mildly spiced, soft-textured bologna from the Pennsylvania Dutch country. Trail bologna, as far as I can tell, is a similar item from Ohio. Both of them -- and I haven't tasted a million samples, but I've had a few -- strike me as similar in taste, texture, and appearance to Hebrew National kosher beef bologna and salami products. Maybe we can get some more precise definitions.

All of the above, being all beef (as is, I believe, Oscar Mayer), are, of course, completely different from real bologna, aka mortadella, which is made from a combination of beef and pork.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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looks like salami tho, huh?

does it taste different from salami?

LB has a very distinct aroma, just short of over smoked, was what my nose read, upon first whiff.

I had a few slices last evening "nekid" and there was a slight bite of fermento or meat cure.

Visually, it appears of a salami, but the white flecking or fat, is much smaller in size than what you would normally see in most salami's.

My daughter taught me well though regarding sandwich making. Slices of sharp cheese on the bottom and top, with plenty of LB in between, is a marriage liking of bread and butter. Oh yeah, on rye.

I'd put it at a cross between salami and bologna.

Salami, Salami, Bologna.. (old three stooges skit)

woodburner

Edited by woodburner (log)
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It would scarcely be surprising for Penn Dutch and Ohio products to be similar. Both areas are anabaptist strongholds (Anabaptists including Mennonites, Amish, Brethren and others). Penn Dutch is usually a reference to the culture of the Pennsylvania anabaptist communities most famously centered around Lancaster County. Lebanon is county and town just north of Lancaster County.

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Landjaegers? Salami? Kosher bologna?

Holy Cow, what are you guys talking about? Lebanon and Sweet bologna are wonderful things. There is no resemblence to those other things. Were I live, in lancaster, they are staples of life. The taste is smoke and cure. The sweet is the same thing with sugar added for a smoke and sweet flavor. I can't believe that it is not available in Philadelphia. The leading brands are Kunzlers, Baums, Seltzers, Berks and Kutztown. Kunzlers probably most available as they are the largest of the producers. Their product looks just like the picture. Baums makes a smaller product. I like them all really. When we go to the store and see it on sale at the deli my wife always says to me, " they have sweet bologna on sale" and I always get some. I like it on Martin's potato roll s with mustard and cheese. This is amongst the greatest sandwiches invented. On New Years Eve in Lebanon they drop a 75 pound Lebanon Bologna at midight than slice it up and hand it out.

i wonder what Georges Perrier would think of a sweet bologna sandwich? I hope he would like it though I will not be looking for it on the Le Bec Fin menu anytime soon. Seriously, get some and try it and I think you will love it.

Final point is a Landjaeger anything like a Land Rover? Does it have four wheel Drive?

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Actually I was coming at it from the opposite side: I grew up eating lebanon bologna my whole life--my family is from Lycoming County. The first time I had a landjaeger, which was from stoltzfus meats in the terminal, I thought to myself, this tastes like lebanon bologna but in stick form. It's basically a small smoked cured sausage. You might say the taste is smoke and cure.

I just thought more people might have had them, since they're not as regional as lebanon bologna.

Anyway, LB is available at any of the amish stands in the terminal, for anyone who hasn't had it.

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