Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Hearth


NY News Team
 Share

Recommended Posts

The mushrooms are roasted and served on a solitary white plate. Have your fork ready when they arrive; even good friends will betray you.

Interesting... It's like she went to Hearth with Ellen Shapiro. :smile:

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

La Hesser gave Asiate a one star compared to two for Hearth.

Any comments?

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To many people, of course, casualness is a plus -- they'd rather go to Hearth than to a place where most men are wearing coat and tie. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that preference, but the langauge of the star system presupposes the opposite set of expectations.

Steven I think that in the post 9-11 world, many, many people would prefer to go to a casual restaurant than your typical dress-up environment that the "3 star" and "4 star" provides. With more and more places like Mix and Hearth opening up, we're going to see this whole two star/three star conventionality being put to the test as more and more fancy "destination restaurants" start tanking and restauranteurs have to completely re-think about how to make money and make diners happy. I think people want substance and good value in dining, even at the high end -- and dragging them out of their homes to go out to eat has to be a no-brainer and effortless.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, I haven't been. Also, she doesn't say anything about the service. But, from the picture, it looks pretty casual. I can't quite see bar service (meals served at the bar) at a strong three-star restaurant. I, for one maybe, like a tablecloth in my three-star restaurants.

Babbo is a strong three star restaurant that serves meals at the bar.

If it isn't three stars, it very well should be.

Seems time to reinvent the star system, methinks.

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Babbo is a strong three star restaurant that serves meals at the bar.

If it isn't three stars, it very well should be.

Seems time to reinvent the star system, methinks.

Soba

Ah, Babbo! Good point, Soba. I was trying to think of a casual three star.

JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I, for one maybe, like a tablecloth in my three-star restaurants.

Jason are you saying this restaurant is on a par with places like Grammercy Tavern and Craft?

I am also troubled by the absence of tablecloths -- too casual for a 3rd star. Casualness and decor also hurt WD50.

Mix doesn't have tablecloths either. At least, I don't remember them having them when I had lunch with Fat Guy there recently.

And Mix is again another 2 star that was robbed of a 3 star, correct? Or is it a 3 that was robbed of a 4?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it would be reductionistic in the extreme to lay down axiomatic rules such as "No tablecloths equals no three stars" and "Bar menu equals no three stars." Surely there would be enough counterexamples to refute any such claims. Times change, and even at the highest levels of dining everything is far more casual today than ever before. Is there a single restaurant left in New York that requires a necktie for gentlemen? I'm fairly certain none of the four-star restaurants do -- at most they require a jacket, which really is not a big deal since even the dot.com types can wear a jacket over a tee-shirt and still meet the dress code.

Still, although times change, there is a certain continuity to the system of rank-ordering restaurants. Today, it's not formality as such but rather a certain level of luxury -- stylish surroundings, a certain amount and quality of service, extensive beverage programs, and other indicia of a significant investment aimed at creating a high-end experience -- that brackets each of the star categories. Babbo is a beautiful restaurant in a historic building -- the old Coach House -- offering extensive wine service. Yes, it's relatively casual for a three-star, but it's still in the three-star ballpark. Lupa, on the other hand, could simply never be a three-star restaurant -- no matter how good the food; not even if it served the exact same menu as Babbo.

Mix is casual in the sense that it lacks a lot of the old-style formality but it is a very stylish and modern place. I don't think anybody would argue that there's an absolute two-star limit on a place like Mix, where something like $8 million went into making the modernist statement. Mix does currently carry two stars, but that's a nutty rating for a place that serves four-star food in a three-star setting and manner.

Hearth is a terrific restaurant. I have nothing negative whatsoever to say about the place. My meal there was highly enjoyable, the chef is as talented as can be, and I would recommend it to anybody who loves good food. It also offers very good value. But there's a difference between loving a restaurant and thinking it should have a certain number of stars. Hearth is a lovable two-star restaurant -- it represents all the best in a two-star place. I would choose it over many three-star places. But that doesn't make it a three-star restaurant.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

La Hesser gave Asiate a one star compared to two for Hearth.

Any comments?

The rating for Hearth makes sense, subject to the reservations I expressed above (on an absolute scale it makes sense, but it's insane for all those has-been restaurants to hold three stars while Hearth holds two). The rating for Asiate makes no sense (it can only be three or two stars for Asiate, as far as I'm concerned).

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[Hearth is a lovable two-star restaurant -- it represents all the best in a two-star place. I would choose it over many three-star places. But that doesn't make it a three-star restaurant. ]

Having not eaten at Hearth yet {but having tried most of the dishes mentioned in the review (including the delicious snapper crudo) at a De Gustibus cooking class with Marco Canora} two stars sounds right. The chef mentioned the ingredient constraints he has in order to meet the price point he feels is appropriate to the neighborhood. In this sense the contrast to certain Craft options is clear, though many of my favorite dishes there are made from "humble" ingredients (cheeks, anyone). The star rating system does tend to reward the presentation of luxury ingredients (a la Ducasse - a style of cuisine that I have chosen to rarely patronize no matter how tasty).

But Fat Guy, I take exception on the issue of L'Impero, which is one of the best meals I've had in NY (several times) at that price point, and easier to get into than Babbo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish people would just realize how subjective those stars are. It becomes all the more pointed when there's a new reviewer in town. I support Fat Guy's point about the potential of a restaurant. I've heard people in the trade speak of a yet to be opened restaurant in terms of stars. The actual quality of the food is yet to be demonstrated, but it can be acknowledged that they are planning a certain type of restaurant.

Anyway, there are lots of inequities in the official box scores of the NY Times. Fat Guy named a few. There are always going to be good restaurants in elegant surroundings with elegant service. I'm talking about good honest restaurants that are just not a buy in terms of food alone. I'm not talking about pretentious places. There are also going to be those places offering great value in food terms because you're not paying for much overhead. How they score against each other is going to matter greatly on who's keeping score.

I haven't been to Hearth so I can't comment on their score, but it's a better review than was Asiate. Still there are annoying things about it. Babbo wasn't the first one name restaurant in NYC. "Giving a restaurant a single name is intended to brand it: part mantra and part haiku." Huh? I reserve an opinion about the bandages. The food writing was good and happily, it formed the bulk of the review. It sounds better than some three stars, and no better than some two stars. That just makes a discussion of the stars pointless.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm...One-name restaurants...How about Gitlitz, the good kosher delicatessen that used to be on 77 St. and Broadway and closed over 20 years ago, I guess? How about Lutece? How about Mocca? There are a bunch. Add an "'s" to the equation, and we get Luchow's, Lundy's, etc., etc.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps not, but would a potential diner want to eat in a restaurant that looked like a "cozy infirmary"?

I think not.

Now we both know there are plenty of holes-in-the-wall type places in New York that serve amazing food in settings that would make David Rockwell cringe. That's not Hearth of course -- but then again, a vivid description like "cozy bandages in a home that looks like an infirmary" is the last thing I want to read were I someone who was considering going to dine at Hearth based on the strength of the review alone.

That the food writing wasn't bad is missing the point. Isn't the point of a restaurant review a summation of all the elements that make a restaurant worth going to? Food, service, ambiance (which includes decor)? With the review of Asiate, it wasn't about the food but rather the view. Here at Hearth, it was mostly about the food. I expect that the next review will be about the service or lack thereof.

Amanda, you're a good food writer, but you still need to find your balance with respect to your restaurant criticism.

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now we both know there are plenty of holes-in-the-wall type places in New York that serve amazing food in settings that would make David Rockwell cringe.

I'd be delighted to go anywhere that would make him cringe! If you're dissatisfied with the food critics, how good do you think the art and music critics are? :angry:

But we'd better not get off on that tangent...

I agree that the bandages slam was pretty severe. I haven't been in the restaurant, but from the outside, it looked fancy to me. That said, the only thing that meant to me was that it was probably too expensive for me to go to...

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

So anyway, tomorrow I'm having dinner at Hearth. I was supposed to go with a friend but he cancelled out on me a week ago. :sad: (I REALLY hate dining alone.)

Since it'll be my first time and since I just took a look at their February menu (omg!!!! So many good choices to choose from!), I can't decide what to have.

I was thinking I'd do the tasting menu. (Maybe Chef Canora has changed to the spring menu. If so, that'd be really cool.)

Any suggestions? Also, I'm probably going to emerge out of my self-enclosed no-wine shell. Just a peek mind you. How is the sommelier at Hearth? (Full disclosure: I prefer whites to reds, purely because of taste. That said, I usually don't drink and in fact, can count on two hands the number of glasses of wine I have had ever since I turned 21. :wink: )

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Paul Grieco, the sommalier and co-owner was superb IMO. He has a fantastic wine list, full of interesting and reasonably priced choices. Do have the mushrooms and gnocchi sides. In fact, I would suggest not doing the tasting menu, but with those sides let Chef Canora guide you. Their cheese is also excellent.

Edited by docsconz (log)

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(I REALLY hate dining alone.)

...

I was thinking I'd do the tasting menu. (Maybe Chef Canora has changed to the spring menu. If so, that'd be really cool.)

Maybe the open kitchen will provide entertainment and you won't mind eating alone this time. I really like eating alone, especially if there's that kind of entertainment (i.e. watching sushi chef).

Are morels a spring thing in NY? I can't wait for Canora to get a hold of them.

JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a lot of good choices. I think that the octopus appetizer and the veal breast are both great examples of Chef Marco Canora's talents. If you are dining alone, may I suggest that you call and ask the restaurant if you can have one of the seats at the counter overlooking the open kitchen. It's a uncommon experience. As far as wine goes, as noted, Paul Grieco is a master and they will pair fine wine choices by the glass to whatever your food selection is. Enjoy, and don't forget dessert!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, ended up having dinner at Hearth with Bux and his wife tonight. (Originally had a table for two, but tried to extend it to three when my friend cancelled. Thankfully, we managed to secure a table.)

A minor, minor point of criticism (but understandable considering it was a Saturday night with lots of turnover for tables): we felt a bit rushed, with staff clearing our plates before we felt we were done. Otherwise, altogether an amazing experience, and I will definitely be back again. There are so many wonderful things on the menu that I want to try, that we didn't get this time around.

I'll let Bux talk about his selections and the wine. (Interestingly enough, I liked the wine which is a huge statement for me because I prefer whites to reds. This was a red with a pleasant bouquet, heavy on fruit and very little tannin.) In addition, the menu has changed slightly to a transitional spring menu. I expect that the changes will become more apparent as the season progresses.

Amuse: Warm yellow pepper soup, served in a mini-shot glass. Creamy, good mouth feel, with tones of sweetness but not overly so. Nice balance of piquancy and sweetness.

Apps

Game Bird Terrine [shaved brussel sprouts, red cabbage, green apple] (12) (me)

Red Wine Braised Octopus [celery root, celery, potato] (12) (Bux)

Roasted Quail [farro, tomato preserves, quail egg] (10) (Esilda)

Mains

Braised Lamb Shoulder and Ribs [lamb tongue, escarole and borlotti beans] (22) (me)

Roasted Sirloin [braised short rib, trumpet royale mushrooms, shallots] (26) (Esilda)

I can't remember off the top of my head what Bux had.

In addition, we had a side of gnocchi. (These were ethereal. Just enough solidity with an accent of cheese (parm-reg?) to make a difference. Well worth getting.)

Very nice combinations, especially the lamb. (I'm very partial to lamb, so my opinion is a bit biased. :biggrin: ) The octopus had, according to Bux, a very meaty texture.

Desserts

goat milk panna cotta [huckleberry compote] (8) (Bux)

warm pound cake [candied kumquats, vanilla ice cream] (8) (me)

The bill came out to a little over $200 (we had incidentals such as espresso and tea), not bad for a dinner for three; factor out the cost of the wine and it comes out to $52 a piece (tax included, but not tip).

I highly recommend it.

Chef Canora, if you happen to read this, where do you get your dishes and serving ware? They're beautiful, in keeping with the restaurant's style. The room is well-designed and looks great. Warm, soothing colors. So much for "bandages in a cozy infirmary".

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So glad you had good company and a good time! Everything sounds worth trying -- especially the magic words: ethereal gnocchi! We'll be near there tomorrow afternoon, but not able to eat there anyway. But now it is WAY up on my list of places to try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...