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New Year's Eve: What are You Eating or Serving?


sarah w
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Ham. Black eyed peas in the form of a cold salad. Collard greens (boiled then cooked down in a cast iron frying pan with bacon grease and a pinch of sugar) if the store has them this year, they did last year but that was the first time in a long time. Cornbread. Not sure what else, maybe mac and cheese. I'd love for the ham to be a nice country ham but that's not available here. That will be for New Year's Day. New Year's Eve is usually just snacks/finger foods and watching movies. I no longer feel any desire to go out or party for the occasion.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Black eyed peas are a must for New Year's Day.  I haven't decided on the rest of the menu yet.  NYE is our anniversary--15 years--so I'm trying to think of something fun and wonderful.  I have foie frozen so that will probably be in the mix somehow.

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We'll be having black-eye peas for sure, seasoned with pork.

 

Probably spinach, because the commercial collards available to me are tough and overgrown. By the time they're cooked to tenderness, their color and flavor has faded, and I have to think their nutritional value suffers for the long cook. So spinach it is.

 

I'm also making the corn pone/uthapam fusion I came up with after eating at an excellent Indian restaurant. I went on line to find recipes for the uthapam batter and found it was made of urad dal and rice which are soaked, ground and fermented. Daunting.

 

So I tried my normal corn pancake with wheat flour recipe, and after dropping on the hot griddle added grated carrot, minced onion, frozen peas to all, and jalapenos only to mine, because the husband is not a capsaicin fan. Flip after the first side is cooked. They take a little longer to cook the second side and brown because of the dense veggie topping.

 

They turned out SO good, and we've had them a hundred times since, so they're definitely on the menu.

 

Edited to add: Like Norm said, I'm not normally superstitious at all, but why push your luck, when all you have to do is eat delicious food?  :smile:

Edited by Thanks for the Crepes (log)
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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Yes, black-eyed peas are a must in the south.  I'm also not fond of the traditional Hoppin' John so I usually make a version of Texas 'caviar' with them; it is a cold salad and quite good.  

 

When we moved to rural Virginia, imagine my shock at the local Safeway before New Years when the meat counter was full of pig faces.  Local tradition.  I was young then and grossed out; now I wish I had tried them.  

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Yes, black-eyed peas are a must in the south. I'm also not fond of the traditional Hoppin' John so I usually make a version of Texas 'caviar' with them; it is a cold salad and quite good.

When we moved to rural Virginia, imagine my shock at the local Safeway before New Years when the meat counter was full of pig faces. Local tradition. I was young then and grossed out; now I wish I had tried them.

I grew up with hoppin John of collards and black-eyed peas but with flanken instead of ham hocks (kosher) and still like them but I've been making my version of Texas caviar the last several years. Eat it year round but on New Years add a chiffonade of raw or wilted collars to the salad. In fact I'll be making them this year at our small NY party. It's just a darn good cold bean salad.

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If you don't care for rice with Hoppin' John, there are many versions of Texas Caviar that call for hominy instead of rice, and some of them are even called "Hoppin' John", although I don't think that's accurate.

 

I think Hoppin' John or Texas Caviar is a very appropriate New Year's dish, at least in the South.

 

Google it, or if anyone's interested, or I have an old recipe from an Eastern Star cookbook. PM me if you'd like it.

 

This cookbook is interesting because it's written by a bunch of very old white southern ladies in the 80's, many of whom have died by now. It was produced as a fundraiser to support their very expensive habit of driving all over NC to attend and sometimes lead the Eastern Star meetings.

 

The great thing I've found about this cookbook is, that there's a preponderance of very reliable recipes due to their experience. The bulk of them tend to be very easy, too, and I'd attribute that to their aching old bones.

 

I bought the cookbook when I worked there, constantly hearing "she isn't EVEN an Eastern Star." Most came to like me anyway in the eight years I was their SysOp.

 

Everyone knows the nutritional benefits of combining rice with legumes to make a complete protein,

 

Anyone got any nutrition info for legumes (specifically black-eye peas) with hominy?

 

I went to NutrionData, which is usually really reliable, but they had no info on hominy.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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re: Hominy for New Years:

 

Posole was traditional for the Holidays where we lived in Mexico; there it was always red.  I prefer the green posole which you see a lot of in New Mexico.  

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Serious Eats has a fascinating article on how the current version of hoppin john is debased from the historical version and relatively flavorless, only existing due to tradition. The historical version he provides is apparently much better, now that traditional heirloom varieties are available once again.

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PS: I am a guy.

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The best part was the transportation in my mind to a field in east Texas in the early 70's where we picked crowder peas, then took them home, shelled, cooked and ate them. Sublime.

I remember fresh purple hull peas straight out of the field.

 

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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And back to the OP's question!

Most of you folk are located in that cold northern hemisphere part of the orb we all are clinging to. Although I am also clinging to the orb, I am located on the southern side of it, where it is decidedly warm and thus ideal for outside activities. My New Year's Eve dinner is pretty simple - 'n dop en 'n tjop! This simply means a good drink (dop) whilst around a fire enjoying a lamb chop (tjop) or two, some boerewors and a few other items cooked on the glowing wood embers - known as a "braai".

Cape Town is a coastal city with thousands of fishing and recreational boats and there will be the normal fireworks display in the harbour to celebrate the arrival of the New Year. I will not be there but simply in my back garden, drink in hand, making sure none of the hundreds of unused distress flares launched by the inebriated boat owners does not land on the house!

No "black eyed peas". Just 'n dop en 'n tjop and bubbly at midnight! And in case I forget, cheers all, may the year ahead be better than the old one. John.

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Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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I always start of the new year with traditional pork and sauerkraut, because, you know, a pig roots forward...while poultry scratch backwards and cattle stand still!  :smile:

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Looks like I'm re-thinking the entire plan. No collards in the store as of today and no black eyed peas either. They carry the dried peas but the usual spot was empty so I asked... nope, none. So the traditional southern theme is being tossed. Not sure where I'm headed next. I don't want anything that requires too much fuss or attention, New Year's day is going to be 12 hours of football for me and I don't want to interrupt that too much messing with food. Gonna jump around between the Outback, Cotton and Citrus bowls in the morning and then really focus on the Rose and Sugar bowls (the two playoff games this year) in the late afternoon/evening. Food will not be my primary interest. After a few weeks of unseasonably warm weather, we're back to the nasty cold stuff again so the forecast (-20 C for the high) isn't looking too good for trying to do something in the smoker that day. I may just put on a pot of chili or stew or something and call it good enough.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I'm thinking about BBQ venison meatballs, David Ross's Crab Dip (which was ABSOLUTELY AMAZING at Christmas dinner!!!), and the usual veggie tray, crackers, chips, etc.

 

For desserts/sweets, either a whole cheesecake, or some mini-cheesecakes.  The chocolate one I did for Christmas dinner was fantastic- but very very rich. I am tempted to do that again; although it was the raspberry cheesecake that disappeared in record time. So, maybe some mini's of both varieties..   And then, some chocolate covered marshmellows rolled in soft, crushed peppermint- for the gluten-free crowd.

 

Drinks....I will toodle down to the Yummy Bar and see what is available. I'm quite fond of the Viking Blod they introduced to me. :wink:  Our high today is 17F, so, the warm spiciness sounds all the more enticing- as I am sure the temps will be in that neighborhood on New Year's Eve.

 

So many delicious idea here...so little time. What's one to do?!

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-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

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Somewhere on eGullet in the last two days or so, someone mentioned Macaroni and Cheese and so that's what we are having for New Year's.  DH will make it with his Mom's old recipe.  Yum.  A good way to welcome 2015.

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Not sure if it's where you saw it but I mentioned it as part of my southern style dinner plan that isn't going to be happening do to circumstances beyond my control. I could still make the mac and cheese part but I've already started leaning heavily towards just doing a big pot of chili now. Not sure how chili with mac and cheese on the side would be...

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Tri2Cook, I think you are correct.  I'm thinking about mac and cheese and chili but I'm not coming up with anything.  Besides we had chili for lunch today and once a week is enough.  Let us know if you do both of them together and if it could work. 

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Tri2Cook, I think you are correct.  I'm thinking about mac and cheese and chili but I'm not coming up with anything.  Besides we had chili for lunch today and once a week is enough.  Let us know if you do both of them together and if it could work. 

Not sure it's a pairing that will be appearing on restaurant menus anytime soon but they'd probably be okay together. Sort of a deconstructed Cincinnati 3-way. :raz: 

 

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Somewhere on eGullet in the last two days or so, someone mentioned Macaroni and Cheese and so that's what we are having for New Year's.  DH will make it with his Mom's old recipe.  Yum.  A good way to welcome 2015.

I agree...eating a favorite meal is a good way to start the New Year. Beans or peas be damned. :angry:  :laugh:

I originally planned on corned beef and cabbage for New Year's Day. I enjoy it on St. Patrick's Day so why not start the New Year with it, as well? 

But I just got back from a week's vacation spent with my family down in San Diego and while I was there my mom made a huge batch of beef noodle soup from the leftover prime rib bones we had for Christmas Eve dinner. She freezes large jars of the soup and hands them out as our family members visit her. She gave me a mammoth jar of the soup to take with me back home so I will be eating the soup for quite a number of days/meals. I helped her make the soup so I already know it's going to be tasty.  :wub:

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Well lets make a broad  thread  about  nibbles, lunch, dinner, dessert and drinks.

 

What are you going to have?

 

Menu here is pretty set. Lunch will be raclette  with bread, salad and pommac to drink,  pommac is a Swedish none alcoholic alternative to champagne, even though it doesn't  taste like but it has a more grown up flavour then normal sodas.

 

Dinner, pulled pork  stuffed into pita bread with  lettuce and vegetable and sour cream sauce   ginger ale or more pommac   and for dessert  chocolate fondue with marshmallow,  pound cake and  banana, is there anything else we  could dip that isnt out of season berries?

 

 

Nibbles, we are think nuts since the kid likes it.

Dried fruit - especially apricots - and candied orange slices.  Also, pretzels, almond macarons (unfilled), or any small cookie. At work we also serve grapes and cut pineapple, along with strawberries, which satisfies anyone who wants something lighter.  All are out of season though.

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Our NYE dinner is grilled rack of lamb served with a cherry chipotle sauce.  The lamb is already slathered in marinade in the fridge as I type.  Side of grilled radicchio with a reduced balsamic dressing.  We're in FL this year in our new home and taking advantage of the warm evenings for outside cooking.  

 

Our NYD meal will be pork belly tacos with fresh cabbage slaw and salsa verde.  Side of Texas caviar.  

 

No desserts nor heavy starches as we face the reality of the post-holiday bathroom scale.    

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