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sarah w

New Year's Eve: What are You Eating or Serving?

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27 minutes ago, Porthos said:

Sous Vide ribeye,  3 1/4 hours at 131. I will chop up and carmelize an onion and add a can of Ranch Style Beans to it. I know that Ranch Style Beans aren't home made but they are a favorite of my DW and mine. Probably will end up serving fruit of some ilk. There will a Hendrick's gin and tonic a little later. I will will open a red for dinner.

 

 

I'm a mean grandpa. I won't let my 3 3/4 y/o grandson watch any given movie twice in the same day. I will do something like Toy Story, TS2 and TS3 in the same day. And now that he and his parents have moved out I need to get my own copy of Hotel Transylvania.

 

He's on the autism spectrum, which means it's VERY easy for him to watch a movie back to back to back to back. And it's generally not productive to not let him do so, unless I can offer an attractive alternative.

 

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Cooking! cooking! cooking! >:( Everyone expects me to cook dinner for them for the holidays.

Well, enough! You come to my place, you gonna have to cook your own food.

Had a hot pot dinner.  :B Everyone cooked their own food.:D

dcarch

5a499076234c3_Christmashotpot.thumb.JPG.876735667d2adc9bed8414fb92f3ce23.JPG5a4990778ce68_Christmashotpot2.thumb.JPG.8ba4634c984ca8c8b5a52b7ff6bcff15.JPG

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Posted (edited)

New Year’s Eve Beast!

 

Ready for the oven.

E8CAFD1C-BCF3-417B-A422-9EA149961606.thumb.jpeg.c545d7466dfa5094d830e76248c54577.jpeg

 

After 5 hours at 170F (lowest my oven could go!).

A969BE18-D8AF-475B-9935-7F2A0798948D.thumb.jpeg.dc808dfc8ae6d68cdda5665a492b2720.jpeg

 

Rested for an hour, then 10 minutes at 500F.

F3320F65-FC33-42A1-980A-354FDC5D1240.thumb.jpeg.af911f23816c43b7c58dc3f89f5dcdba.jpeg

 

Prime Rib Sandwiches for New Year’s Day!

 


Edited by robirdstx (log)
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41 minutes ago, robirdstx said:

New Year’s Eve Beast!

That is one beautiful "beast".

 

Our tradition, for over 40 years is to have lobster and champagne for dinner.

 

5a49a9a70b2f4_LobstertwowaysDecember31st2017.thumb.jpg.0cb997df0884f19031af2f7fad31a546.jpg

Tonight I did lobster tails two ways.  One poached in garlic butter and served over mashed potatoes and

the other basted with garlic butter and broiled in the CSO.

 

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@Ann_T Beautiful. Got a time and temp for the CSO lobster?

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1 minute ago, gfweb said:

@Ann_T Beautiful. Got a time and temp for the CSO lobster?

Gfweb,  temp was 500°F and just over 10 minutes.

 

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1 hour ago, Ann_T said:

Gfweb,  temp was 500°F and just over 10 minutes.

 

 

Were you happy with it cooked this way?

 

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AS posted on the Dinner topic.

 

oysters.thumb.jpg.defca0824eccce42d3627ccb425b182d.jpg

 

 

prawns.thumb.jpg.3d660d5031dba21ef71034ff16186044.jpg

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My mom wanted to cram in as many good luck foods as she could so we did pork and sausage cooked in apple cider with sauerkraut and onion and apple, and I made a version of Texas caviar, and we bought a new year’s pretzel. Also made mashed potatoes to go with the pork. Tomorrow will be leftovers.

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At a wedding so don't remember much about the food.  Macallan 12 was the drink of choice .  Nuff said 

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Big ole salad

 

IMG_3945.jpg.ad522b49c87295bd5e8aca5da77c5e32.jpg

 

Mushroom/onion/parm toasties and tomato and cheddar toasties

 

IMG_3947.jpg.d9ae93a8475f236c3f608306e7147854.jpg

 

Baked taters and crab legs

 

IMG_3948.jpg.401c2ca98f673da609257c26790b82d5.jpg

IMG_3949.jpg.008ef4fc623a7dbce81493503cae8b9b.jpg

Had a hankering for a chocolate cream pie so I made one for dessert

 

IMG_3946.jpg.63806ebc116bb8f6d1244db79945da67.jpg

IMG_3950.jpg.4fc20584fb493c0559c2873a3035c876.jpg

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, FauxPas said:

Were you happy with it cooked this way?

@FauxPas, yes very.   I used the broil  setting without steam.


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, Duvel said:

May I join as well ? Pllleeeaaaase ?

Aww, that's sweet of you. It was so nice to have some simple soup. Not to disparage rich xmas food, but If I have to look at another tomato cheese casserole or giant haunch of anything I'm going to run screaming from the table. I had some duck broth frozen, so literally this meal's biggest challenge was figuring how how much udon to boil for two people. The Japanese seem to love the number five. The udon I like comes in five bundles to a package; the bundles are always too much for one person and not enough for two.

 

I admit that I make duck broth by the cheater's method: I buy whole roast duck in Chinatown and have them chop it. I make a simple noodle dish and top it with the best meatiest pieces of the duck. Or, if I can't resist, we just go at it when we get it home. Okay, this is gross but it's all in the family: I save the bones from the gnawed on duck. Then I make a stock using those bones and all the pieces we didn't eat. I might add a pork neck bone if I have one frozen (I do this if I have a duck and a half or two ducks; I don't want to dilute the flavor too much.) After two hours or so the stock is rich and the bonus is there is a reasonable amount of duck meat on the bones that is still very tasty and no worse for wear. I pick it off, save it, and then strain and defat the soup, saving the duck fat as well. The leftover shredded duck works well in a stir fry or wonton soup or whatever.

 

Chinese roast duck is the gift that keeps on giving. A word to the wise: it often comes with a little container of sauce. This is very salty and very potent. DO NOT add it to the duck broth. I portion it out and use it as part of a stir-fry sauce or as an ingredient in a sauce for noodles. 

 

Happy new Year!

 

I should amend the post. I just looked at some of the scrumptious meals pictured above. Outstanding, all of it. Give me a couple of weeks to recover and then I'm there.


Edited by Katie Meadow (log)
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

The Japanese seem to love the number five. The udon I like comes in five bundles to a package; the bundles are always too much for one person and not enough for two.

 

That's because one of the pronunciations of the number 4 is "shi," which also is the one for "death." It's similar to the attitude here in the States, at least in some quarters, toward the number 13. Items therefore are sold in fives rather than fours. Other examples of this are sake and tea sets, which in Japan will have five cups.

 

There also are lexical rules and customs about when to use "shi" and when to use its alternative, "yon."


Edited by Alex to make the post more accurate (log)

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New Years Day lunch: Black eyed peas, pork shanks, collard greens, corn bread sticks and Povitica bread.

20180101_113352.jpg

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1 hour ago, Katie Meadow said:

Aww, that's sweet of you. It was so nice to have some simple soup. Not to disparage rich xmas food, but If I have to look at another tomato cheese casserole or giant haunch of anything I'm going to run screaming from the table. I had some duck broth frozen, so literally this meal's biggest challenge was figuring how how much udon to boil for two people. The Japanese seem to love the number five. The udon I like comes in five bundles to a package; the bundles are always too much for one person and not enough for two.

 

I admit that I make duck broth by the cheater's method: I buy whole roast duck in Chinatown and have them chop it. I make a simple noodle dish and top it with the best meatiest pieces of the duck. Or, if I can't resist, we just go at it when we get it home. Okay, this is gross but it's all in the family: I save the bones from the gnawed on duck. Then I make a stock using those bones and all the pieces we didn't eat. I might add a pork neck bone if I have one frozen (I do this if I have a duck and a half or two ducks; I don't want to dilute the flavor too much.) After two hours or so the stock is rich and the bonus is there is a reasonable amount of duck meat on the bones that is still very tasty and no worse for wear. I pick it off, save it, and then strain and defat the soup, saving the duck fat as well. The leftover shredded duck works well in a stir fry or wonton soup or whatever.

 

Chinese roast duck is the gift that keeps on giving. A word to the wise: it often comes with a little container of sauce. This is very salty and very potent. DO NOT add it to the duck broth. I portion it out and use it as part of a stir-fry sauce or as an ingredient in a sauce for noodles. 

 

Happy new Year!

We do the exact same thing (with chicken as well!)  It amazes me the number of people who throw bones out without making a basic stock.  Then again I also save all my veg trimmings for stock too...

 

Oh, and re: the gnawed on bones, we do that as well!  After all, they are boiled, and opening up the bones just gets that much more flavour into the soup.

 

 

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We ended up with Chinese food, non-photo worthy, but I will make Coquilles Saint-Jacques with Champagne tonight.

 

I did make a French 75 for last night's libations and it was delicious! I don't like champagne or cognac, but I wanted to try something new and I'm glad I did, because this combination is tasty.

It's a Town and Country's recipe

http://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/drinks/g2920/cognac-cocktails/?slide=6

 

 

IMG_2537.JPG

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1 hour ago, Smokeydoke said:

We ended up with Chinese food, non-photo worthy, but I will make Coquilles Saint-Jacques with Champagne tonight.

 

I did make a French 75 for last night's libations and it was delicious! I don't like champagne or cognac, but I wanted to try something new and I'm glad I did, because this combination is tasty.

It's a Town and Country's recipe

http://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/drinks/g2920/cognac-cocktails/?slide=6

 

 

IMG_2537.JPG

I'm not a drinker, and I like a sip or two of a French 75.

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6 hours ago, Alex said:

 

That's because one of the pronunciations of the number 4 is "shi," which also is the one for "death." It's similar to the attitude here in the States, at least in some quarters, toward the number 13. Items therefore are sold in fives rather than fours. Other examples of this are sake and tea sets, which in Japan will have five cups.

 

There also are lexical rules and customs about when to use "shi" and when to use its alternative, "yon."

 

 

I once staged a luncheon for 100 as part of a formal announcement of a Japanese business project. I was checking details that morning when the florist came in with centerpieces for each of the 10-top tables...each of which had four chrysanthemums in it.

 

The florist thought I was nuts when I told her we were either taking one flower out of each centerpiece, or she was bringing enough more to add one to each. 

 

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Our fun and junky food mentioned upthread.  After all the highfalutin foods eaten at those two weddings in 2016 & 2015, this was a welcome and relaxed celebration:D.   Most of the pictures are self-explanatory:

DSCN7848.JPG.2c3df289b284fc679e196f1af4d529c2.JPG

 

DSCN7849.JPG.5ce6ace069c1f23782ae6dfc11b2f0b4.JPG

 

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DSCN7852.JPG.a4218fc7a2990a4018ba167e886cf00a.JPG

 

That terrible Velveeta, salsa and sausage slow cooker dip that somehow gets gobbled up:

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Meatballs w/ apricot/soy sauce/BBQ sauce:

DSCN7854.JPG.43e1859525b8e404ae2d1d93e53a4342.JPG

 

Crab Meltaways:

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Pigs in a Blanket:

DSCN7856.JPG.a9cec9749e55ec62b1610980d1a6079c.JPG

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR, Y’ALL!!!!

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Posted (edited)

Last night's Coquilles Saint-Jacques with Champagne tonight, we tried it with bay scallops (Mr. S request) and sea scallops (as the recipe called for) and I will agree with Mr. S, I did enjoy the bay scallops more. They were both delicious, served with a side of wilted spinach.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2547.JPG

IMG_2542.JPG


Edited by Smokeydoke resized photo (log)
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Fried a chicken for NYD....the required greens are spinach that is in the stuffed mushroom.

 

IMG_3958.jpg.97ae33d510fcf007850213d544083308.jpg

 

 

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