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Philadelphia chocolate


Andrew Fenton
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I've run out of ideas for a present for my dad; and when this happens, it's time for the Old Faithful of holiday gifts: a box of chocolates.

Where should I get them in Philly? I'm tempted to go to Miel, just because I can. And I've never been to Le Bec Fin's pastry shop (and if nothing else, that name would impress my folks.) But I'm open for suggestions.

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Try Jubilee Chocolates - http://www.jubileechocolates.com/. They are in west philly and use locally grown organic flavorings. But that's not why you should try them. The candies are tiny, beautiful, intensely flavored and not too sweet (godivas are too sweet for me). They do unusual flavors like bergamot, saffron and rosewater, and lavender honey, as well as the standards.

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I third the rec for Jubilee's chocolates (although personally, I don't like the mint exactly b/c it tastes like real mint=weedy).

Also LBF's chocolates come in a heavy duty gold foil covered box with a little brown ribbon- elegant compact presentation that says "i came from this $$$$ luxe michelin starred restaurant" but not in an obnoxious way.

kt

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The chocolates from Miel have always been well received by my gift recipients. Pretty presentation both outside and inside the box. And did I mention that they taste amazing? :biggrin:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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You do have access to the best chocolates in the world, (IMHO) Neuhaus. They are sold in the Lord & Taylor across from city hall. But be prepared-- they are also among the priciest chocolates in the world! (From Belgium).

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Jubilee!

Jubilee!

Jubilee!

they sell them at caviar assouline too.

allison

I fifth that recommendation; I'm by no means an expert or conisseur of chocolate, but the Jubilee chocolates are sensational, as are the ones from Miel and LBF, but Jubilee was just extraordinary, flavor-wise, ESPECIALLY the mint confections.

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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Has anyone done a taste-test between Neuhaus and Jubilee? Can't imagine anything in the world beating Neuhaus, though...

As far as Godiva, it is no longer Belgian-- it is owned by Campbell's Soup, although Pennsylvania loyalists should know that it is manufactured somewhere around Hershey, Pa!

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Jubilee would be terrific. I missed out on a tasting of their chocolates earlier in the fall, but Beth went and thought they were amazingly good.

BUT... I didn't get my slacker butt into gear soon enough: according to their website, it's too late for Xmas delivery. I'd like a Philly product (instead of those fancy-dancy furrin chocklits), so I'll head over to Miel this weekend, I think.

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caviar assouline had just gotten some jubliees in when i stopped at lunch today. i am planning on getting some for friends. they took my name in order to reserve them when the box was unpacked. if you're interested in getting them, you might want to give them a call. they have locations at liberty place and reading terminal as well as somewhere in old city.

allison

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I bought a bunch of Miel's chocolate for staff and other present-worthy friends. Somehow I counted wrong and there was one box left over.

Appearance-wise they are spectacular. Taste-wise they are great, though I think I slightly prefer the ones the Belgian Chocolate House used to sell. Price-wise, relatively inexpensive at $36 a pound. Gift-wise, extremely well received.

Best chocolates I've ever had were from a refrigerated case at Harrod's in London, back in the 70's. They were from Belgium, had dairy based centers, and had to be refrigerated. I've searched for them since, including return trips to Harrod's and walking the streets of Brussels, but to no avail.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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  • 4 years later...

gallery_23992_3894_9880.jpg

There's a new contender in the Philadelphia Chocolate scene: Rick Nichols wrote a really nice article about R+D Chocolates, currently available at the Fair Food Farmstand in the Reading Terminal Market.

I'd already had their chocolates - they're really her chocolates, though he inspired the ganache infused with Benton's smoked Tennessee bacon - and they are lovely chocolates, dark, and a bit winey in the coating (72 percent); a flake of fleur de sel giving the toothsome caramels, in particular, a lushly soft and salty finish.

AND!!

R+D is featured today on Philly Mag's Taste Daily blog.

A few eGulleteers have been lucky enough to serve as test subjects for early tweaks, and so can testify that they are indeed crazy good. Congrats to Rae + David for the much-deserved attention, and condolences to the rest of us, because I suspect the demand is going to outstrip the supply for a little while...

oh, right, and they have a website: www.rdchocolate.com

Edited by philadining (log)

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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Awesome. Speaking as one of those lucky friends/guinea pig chocolate tasters, I couldn't be happier about Rae and David getting their due in the local press. The chocolates are amazing. The fleur de sel caramels are bliss inducing. Congrats to both of them for a job well done! Couldn't happen to nicer folks. :wub:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I agree with Katie that the caramels are indeed amazing. Now I must try those bacon-infused ones.

Congrats to the Gordons on a great article! It was such a pleasant surprise to see it in the paper yesterday morning.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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All this talk about chocolate is nice. But while reading the r+d chocolate website I happened upon:

It all started with a quest to make our ideal chocolate cupcake. We started with 3 recipes and picked the best one; we then began changing ingredients and amounts one at a time, always making the best batch from the previous round as a 'control' against which to test the new ones, until we arrived at our perfect chocolate cupcake.

Isn't this as important as chocolate thingies? Shouldn't r+d be spending a significant portion of their time making their "perfect chocolate cupcake" available to we, the public?

Edited by Holly Moore (log)

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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I think truffles and caramels and turtles hold a little better than cupcakes do, so are more practical for their current situation.

If we were someday to see an R+D shop with an oven in close proximity to a sales counter, I'll bet cupcakes would be a possibility. Or at least we should all hope so!

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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  • 2 weeks later...
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