Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
jogoode

Brooklyn Mobilize!

Recommended Posts

I just moved to (or, I should say, I'm staying for a while in) Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. I never thought living in BK would keep me out of Manhattan, but it kind of has. For the last few weeks, I haven't eaten in Manh. except for a couple of F-train trips to Katz's, a trip to the 2nd Ave. Deli, some takoyaki at Otafuku on East 9th Street, and a trip to Beyoglu (for great cacik and ezme among other things) before a concert at the Met. Museum.

I love exploring Sunset Park and Midwood as much as the next eGulleteer, but I'm trying to find good places in and around my neighborhood to prepare for the winter months. (Although I know I'll trek to DUMBO for Torres hot chocolate)

I've been eating often at the Bedouin Tent, a small restaurant on Atlantic Ave. near Bond St., next to the dirt-cheap and competent French bistro, Bacchus. Bedouin is related to a few other restaurants, I think, one on Atlantic and one in Park Slope. The Merguez sandwich was very good, but not as good as their fine lambojim, pitza with ground lamb, tomato, parsley. Every piece of bread I've eaten there came right out of the oven, perfectly crisp while still slightly doughy. Good lentil soup and harira.

Whenever I'm in Brooklyn Heights around breakfast time, I grab some tripe soup at Teresa's, on Montague. It's usually ready around 10 am. I've only once been to Noodle Pudding but was very happy with well-roasted, crisp-skinned half-chicken.

Smith Street's Paninoteca 275 served panini to rival Bread in Soho, and thankfully without the scene. They are serving a spicy sausage and lentil stew this winter, which I have not tried, because I prefer to approximate the dish on my own with sausage from Esposito's Pork Store on Court Street.

Charming Chestnut, on Smith Street, seemed rather ambitious for its size, so I stopped in for excellent grilled sweetbreads with pistachio relish. Wines by the glass are solid and to start they served bread with a high-quality herbed butter and pickles, both made in house. Fried semolina gnocchi with bacon and pumpkin and rutabaga ravioli are a couple dishes lined up for my next trip. They'll cost me something like $7 each. I think this may be the restaurant with the most potential. The chef is Savoy alum David Wurth.

I haven't gotten to eat out as much as I'd like, but there seems to be a lot to try. Bar Tabac serves a fine burger. I haven't tried the infamous Grocery. I'm going to try Sample tonight, that little Smith Street restaurant that spends more time sourcing than cooking. Inexpensive and interesting wine by the glass, cheese from Artisanal, and preserved/canned treats from Italy, Lebanon, Japan, Spain.... I'll report later tonight.

Has anyone been to any of these places and care to comment? I think Suzanne F once mentioned a meal at Bar Tabac.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just checked, the rutabaga ravioli mentioned above is $15, and it's a main course.

----

Tonight at Sample, I had:

-Fuet, the Catalonian sausage

-Smoked mussels, from New Zealand, served with a bit of sweet plum jam (the new Yorker reported sweet tomato jam in its review)

-Rellenos de Bacalao, from Spain

-Giant White Beans, from Greece

-Grilled "Borettane" onions, from Italy

Cheese served with different breads and orange preserve

-Garrotxa, a mild goat's milk cheese from Catalonia, Spain

-Piave Vecchio, described as the flavor equivalent of a Reggiano-Asiago mix, from Italy

A small glass of Coppo'Avvocata, Barbera d'Asti 2000

Everything is served on small plates, but three or four dishes per person is enough for dinner, or at least a good snack. I was sad to hear that they were out of saucisson du Beaujolas and no longer had the bluefin belly they featured a few weeks ago.

My favorites of the evening were the onions, which were sweet but also nicely tart, I assume from having been preserved in vinegar, and the giant white beans, served warm in a bit of tomato sauce, their texture maintained, evidence of the potential of canned beans.

The smoked mussels tasted strongly of smoke and needed the jam badly, but together they were quite delicious even if the mussels were unpleasantly chewy. Fuet was a tasty sausage; it was my first time eating it.

Garrotxa was very mild, slightly tangy with a finish that reminded me of a blue cheese. I typically prefer stronger cheeses, although I turned down an offering of one of my new favorite cheeses -- affidelice au Chablis -- because I had eaten my weight in it a few days before. :smile: ) The piave vecchio was great, certainly a cross in taste (and texture) between Asiago and Reggiano.

The only disappointing dish was the red peppers stuffed with bacalao. The peppers had lost their sweetness and firmness and they came in an indistinguishable creamy, red sauce.

For dinner, I think Sample ends up being too pricey for what it is. With drinks, tax, and tip, it can easily cost thirty or forty dollars a person. But it is ideal for a glass of wine (about twenty by the glass, plus a few specials) and a few dishes after work, or as an alternative to one of those terrible bars that don’t offer food. :smile: It's open until midnight, possibly later on weekends. I love their concept and hope people in the neighborhood give it a chance. Today it was almost empty -- I hope this was due to the weather.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried Zaytoon's? It's on Smith and Sackett, which is a bit of a walk. If you do go, tell me what you think of their merguez sandwich, which I think can be a somewhat ecstatic taste. Friendly, nice service, pleasant decor, family restaurant.

I had a tasty tagine once at the Moroccan place on west side of Atlantic Av. between I think Court and whatever the next street north is. A little on the sweet side.

There's also a Yemeni place that specializes in innards that intrigues me. I could find it, but I don't remember the name of the street - if I'm remembering correctly, it's just east of Atlantic on the street just south of Smith. Sorry for being so fuzzy. But anyway, the best time to go there is lunch, and I always show up too late because of my work schedule and such. If you go there, please report.

I appreciate the recommendations for Bedouin Tent, Paninoteca 275, and Chestnut.


Michael aka "Pan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I think I mentioned passing up Bar Tabac for a Latino steam-table place next door to a Latino/Italian butcher shop (on Smith Street).

AHHHHHH, Noodle Pudding! We :wub::wub: that place. Homemade pastas, interesting food (grilled sardines; rabbit). We were there once with HWOE's nephew, his wife, and toddler -- and the kid practically ate my whole plate of lentil soup! We like to go there before later concerts or after early ones at Bargemusic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you tried Zaytoon's?

....

There's also a Yemeni place that specializes in innards that intrigues me. I could find it, but I don't remember the name of the street...

Zaytoon's is a quick walk from my place. I'll definitely try it. And this Yemeni place sounds very interesting. I've also passed the Lebanese restaurant Tripoli a few times and been tempted.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AHHHHHH, Noodle Pudding! We :wub::wub: that place. Homemade pastas, interesting food (grilled sardines; rabbit). We were there once with HWOE's nephew, his wife, and toddler -- and the kid practically ate my whole plate of lentil soup! We like to go there before later concerts or after early ones at Bargemusic.

my dad loves Bargemusic! I'll take him to NP next time he's there.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JJ, thanks for the report. These all are areas I've been meaning to spelunk around.

Can you idiot-proof the expedition for this Manhattanite? In particular, which subway line/subway stop to take, which direction to walk after exiting the subway, any landmarks to note.

Then, if the weather nudges up above freezing again, I'll be more likely to expand my B'klyn horizons.

thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

alacarte,

I'm afraid this will be far from fool-proof, but i'll give it a shot.

The F-train rules in Carroll Gardens and Cobble Hill. For Smith Street spots (Sample, Chestnut, Bar Tabac, Grocery, Zaytoon (Pan's rec), etc...) take the F to either the Bergen or Carroll St stops. The Carroll St stop is also the one for Esposito's Pork Store and Brooklyn Bread Bakery (good if pricey heroes -- mentioned in Ed Levine's NYT article) both on Court Street, just west of Smith.

From Manhattan, take the F in or take the ACE and transfer at Jay St.

For BK Heights (Teresa's, Noodle Pudding etc...), take just about any train (express, too -- one reason why it's so damn expensive to live in BK Heights) and get off at Court Street/Jay St./Bourough Hall, depending on the train.

For Atlantic Avenue access (Sahadi's, Bedouin Tent, Waterfalls Cafe, Tripoli, Bacchus, Soul Spot,...) take the F to Bergen and walk north a few blocks, or take any train to BK Heights and walk south five minutes.

You can only get to DiFara's on the Q to Ave J. Sunset Park (Ocean Palace, Ba Xuyen) requires a trip on the R or W several stops past P Slope -- R to 45 St, or W to 8th Ave, for the truly excellent banh mi at Ba Xuyen. R to 53rd Street for a bustling Chinatown, vendors hawking all kinds of stuff, including some fried snack called "flover"(?). And isn't there a second BK Chinatown, near Avenue X. To find out, we should take the F.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Then, if the weather nudges up above freezing again, I'll be more likely to expand my B'klyn horizons.

thanks!

And if you do, maybe we can meet for a bite!


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stopped by Biscuit, on Flatbush Ave., tonight. Good looking place. Framed old-school butcher diagrams on the wall -- cozy, quirky, a New Yorkified BBQ joint. Against the opposite wall, an assortment of hot sauces in squeeze bottles. Sam Sifton liked it for $25 and Under, in Nov. 2002. I had some decent slaw and solid roasted veggies as sides. Oh, and a couple biscuits and lots of wings (eat in special: $.25 wings!)

I tried the pulled pork, which was served surrounded by a thick, tangy but inappropriate BBQ sauce and two pieces of white bread. The unsauced pork was the best I've had in NYC. Biscuit's biscuits are very good, rich and buttery if the slightest bit dry. The restaurant is doors down from an intriguing place called Wing Wagon, but it'll be hard for them to beat Biscuit's wings. They are, skeptics, fried but fried well and sparely sauced. But I admit I ended up pouring on various hot sauces on after a couple. Their peanut butter cookie -- a present for my girlfriend that I ate most of on the way home -- was as dense as peanut butter. I think she'll like the rest. They have a pig pickin' every Sunday night.

Has anyone been? Anyone interested in that pig pickin'?


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been to Biscuit several times, and for what I imagine to be totally fake 'cue, it's very enjoyable food.

Glad to see you venturing further into Brooklyn! Across Flatbush from Biscuit, in an oddly shaped storefront, you'll find very good Jamaican spicy beef patties. Get one served in the thick sweet bread for a tasty, carb-heavy $2.00 meal.

Seems like Brooklyn dining is just not on the radar screen here on eGullet. I expect you to change all that, JJ. people like me-- parents of young children-- don't get out enough to keep up anymore.


"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been to Biscuit several times, and for what I imagine to be totally fake 'cue, it's very enjoyable food.

Glad to see you venturing further into Brooklyn!  Across Flatbush from Biscuit, in an oddly shaped storefront, you'll find very good Jamaican spicy beef patties.  Get one served in the thick sweet bread for a tasty, carb-heavy $2.00 meal. 

Seems like Brooklyn dining is just not on the radar screen here on eGullet.  I expect you to change all that, JJ.  people like me-- parents of young children-- don't get out enough to keep up anymore.

:laugh: I wish there were more Brooklynites out there. The more we post about it, the more willing people will be to join in...Where are you in Brooklyn?

I don't do enough exploring outside of Carroll Gardens and Brooklyn Heights. I did eat some great tacos at MATAMOROS PUEBLA TAQUERIA, 193 Bedford Ave., Williamsburg, yesterday. Much better than Pampano Taqueria and even better than the similarly packaged Mexican groceries in Poughkeepsie, where I first learned the pleasures of a grocery store taco. (I took home some great Colston Bassett Stilton from Bedford Cheese.) And I had a good tamales in southern Park Slope, the other day, at Nuevos Tacos (5th Ave. and 12th Street).

I'm not sure whether Biscuit is completely fake BBQ or not. Do you know how their pork is smoked? They have one of those charming disclaimers that says that they are not a fast food restaurant so the food takes longer to be served. It also says every item on their menu is either smoked, cured, pickled, etc... in the restaurant. What have you had?

Edit: Colston


Edited by jogoode (log)

JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always assumed their 'cue wasn't legit because I don't think they can possibly have a pit (or the equivalent) in that storefront-- but Eric Asimov says the pork is "box smoked." I leave it to those who know to say whether this is real or fake 'cue.

I've had the chicken (pretty good), the ribs (pretty average; they need the oversaucing they get), and the pulled pork (which is vinegary and very good, in my uneducated opinion). If I remember the sides correctly, the biscuit is quite good, the mac 'n' cheese and slaw are average, and the fries are nothing to shout about.

I live on the other side of Grand Army Plaza, in Prospect Heights. There's a good jerk chicken place called 3D's over by my place, on Washington Ave near St. John's, but not much else that's notable.

5th Avenue is pretty much where it's at, and you should check out the restaurants there. My wife and I lived just off 5th from 1999 through the end of 2002, and watched the street just explode with life. It continues to move so quickly that we're surprised every time we return to the 'hood. We preferred some of the restos on 5th to the best of Smith, although your recent post on Smith included restaurants we've never been to-- both streets keep changing so fast. On 5th, we really like Convivium, which is between St. Marks and Bergen. The owner Michelle is really a lovely person and they serve very good pan-Spanish/Italian food, with an outsized local Zagat rating to match. We were into Al Di La until we realized that their menu will never change at all. We got bored. We also really like the Bistro St. Marks, which is where St. Marks meets Flatbush; this is the restaurant we go to most frequently when we have the chance to run out for an hour or two. I believe its owner/chef was formerly connected to Bouley in some fashion. We also had a great meal last week at Blue Ribbon Sushi Brooklyn, but it was expensive and it was our first dinner out since our new baby was born in November. So take it for what it's worth.

Outside of 5th, we've found some of the French bistros to be perfectly acceptable, like Patois, the original Smith Street pioneer, and A Table in Ft. Green (I think on Lafayette). Oh, and in your area, my favorite Middle Eastern place for the past 11 years has been a storefront called Fatoosh, on Hicks just North of Atlantic Ave.

We haven't been to the Grocery.

Sorry for rambling off topic. Move this to the other thread if it's more appropriate over there!


"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See this is what Brooklyn posting should be, how it should begin, at least. I've ogled Convivium for a while, but it seems a little pricey. I'll check out Fatoosh; it's pretty close to my apt.

Next time I go to Biscuit, I'll have the fried chicken.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Charming Chestnut, on Smith Street, seemed rather ambitious for its size, so I stopped in for excellent grilled sweetbreads with pistachio relish. Wines by the glass are solid and to start they served bread with a high-quality herbed butter and pickles, both made in house. Fried semolina gnocchi with bacon and pumpkin and rutabaga ravioli are a couple dishes lined up for my next trip. They'll cost me something like $7 each. I think this may be the restaurant with the most potential. The chef is Savoy alum David Wurth.

Very nice dinner at Chestnut tonight. Thick, juicy pork loin with collards and yams, and stuffed with chestnut sausage. Trout with winter squash and olive stew. And a half bottle of Domaine du Vieux Lazaret Chateauneuf du Pape. All very reasonably priced. My only complaint is that the kitchen seems a bit afraid of salt. Oh, and since Robert Sietsema's review you won't be able to shove past the trendoids on any night other than tonight, Super Bowl Sunday.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The beef patty place on Flatbush is called Christy's - and it puts every other beef patty I've had in NYC to shame. It's like a carnival in your mouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please give the cross street, Iain.


Michael aka "Pan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just checked, the rutabaga ravioli mentioned above is $15, and it's a main course.

----

Tonight at Sample, I had:

-Fuet, the Catalonian sausage

-Smoked mussels, from New Zealand, served with a bit of sweet plum jam (the new Yorker reported sweet tomato jam in its review)

-Rellenos de Bacalao, from Spain

-Giant White Beans, from Greece

-Grilled "Borettane" onions, from Italy

Cheese served with different breads and orange preserve

-Garrotxa, a mild goat's milk cheese from Catalonia, Spain

-Piave Vecchio, described as the flavor equivalent of a Reggiano-Asiago mix, from Italy

A small glass of Coppo'Avvocata, Barbera d'Asti 2000

Everything is served on small plates, but three or four dishes per person is enough for dinner, or at least a good snack. I was sad to hear that they were out of saucisson du Beaujolas and no longer had the bluefin belly they featured a few weeks ago.

My favorites of the evening were the onions, which were sweet but also nicely tart, I assume from having been preserved in vinegar, and the giant white beans, served warm in a bit of tomato sauce, their texture maintained, evidence of the potential of canned beans.

The smoked mussels tasted strongly of smoke and needed the jam badly, but together they were quite delicious even if the mussels were unpleasantly chewy. Fuet was a tasty sausage; it was my first time eating it.

Garrotxa was very mild, slightly tangy with a finish that reminded me of a blue cheese. I typically prefer stronger cheeses, although I turned down an offering of one of my new favorite cheeses -- affidelice au Chablis -- because I had eaten my weight in it a few days before. :smile: ) The piave vecchio was great, certainly a cross in taste (and texture) between Asiago and Reggiano.

The only disappointing dish was the red peppers stuffed with bacalao. The peppers had lost their sweetness and firmness and they came in an indistinguishable creamy, red sauce.

For dinner, I think Sample ends up being too pricey for what it is. With drinks, tax, and tip, it can easily cost thirty or forty dollars a person. But it is ideal for a glass of wine (about twenty by the glass, plus a few specials) and a few dishes after work, or as an alternative to one of those terrible bars that don’t offer food. :smile: It's open until midnight, possibly later on weekends. I love their concept and hope people in the neighborhood give it a chance. Today it was almost empty -- I hope this was due to the weather.

Thanks for reporting about this place. I've been curious about it ever since I read about it at Herbacidal's urging.

I like the idea of a true "tapas-type" bar with little plates and great wines by the glass. And the business model is brilliant! Avoids many of the pitfalls that put newbie restaurants out of business in their first year of operation.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's like a carnival in your mouth.

:laugh:

I'm there. Yes, please tell us the cross street. Anything else good at Christy's? Or should I just fill myself with patties :wink:?


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for reporting about this place. I've been curious about it ever since I read about it at Herbacidal's urging.

I like the idea of a true "tapas-type" bar with little plates and great wines by the glass. And the business model is brilliant! Avoids many of the pitfalls that put newbie restaurants out of business in their first year of operation.

It is a cool business model, isn't it. I haven't taken a look in lately, but I hope they are getting customers. Can you be more specific about the "pitfalls" it avoids? I need to learn about that kind of stuff. :smile:


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The beef patty place on Flatbush is called Christy's - and it puts every other beef patty I've had in NYC to shame. It's like a carnival in your mouth.

Christy's Jamaican Bakery, that's right. It's a flatiron-shaped space on the South side of Flatbush (that is, the Park Slope side), at Sterling Place, I believe. If it isn't Sterling, it's Park Place, but I'm almost certain it's Sterling.

They sell other stuff, but I've never been able to keep myself from just getting the beef patty. And be careful, they're hot-- you can burn your tongue if you're not careful.


"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm another Brooklynite checking in. Glad to see this thread.

Question for the rest of you guys.. Have you had the fresh mozzeralla from A&S Pork Store on 5th ave in Park Slope? I was so pleased to discover this a few months ago and declared it some of the best I've had! (Queen rest. on Court St. is still king IMO). Two weeks ago I stopped by A&S and picked up a pound. I was terribly disapointed though. It seems their cheese has possibly gone downhill? A friend of mine corroberated so I don't think it happened to be my specific batch. I heard through the grapevine that they no longer make it in that location, so maybe it changed? I can't confirm this fact though.

I hope that this isn't true. I'll try it again soon and find out. Even if it has gone downhill, I still think it's the best in the Slope though. Better than Russo's and Fratelli.

I'm thinking of slipping them a note under the door to register my complaint. :wink:

~WBC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm putting my two cents in for Red Cafe (78 5th Ave @ Warren Street in Brooklyn, a block from the Bergen St. stop of the 2/3) which I discussed in this thread.

The chef, Mark Shenk, is an old friend who ran Astray Cafe in the West Village for about 20 years, until he lost his lease. I hate when that happens!

Anyway, if you're in the 'hood, I'd recommend it. Small menu with everything from interesting sandwiches and salads to full appetizers and entrees. And always get the soup of the day--it's consistently amazing.

:smile:

Jamie


See! Antony, that revels long o' nights,

Is notwithstanding up.

Julius Caesar, Act II, Scene ii

biowebsite

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(Queen rest. on Court St. is still king IMO).

Sorry, WBC. I've never tried the fresh mozzarella at either places. How is Queen Restaurant, btw?

If I was in the market for mozz in BK, I'd probably try Tuller, on Court Street. This is kind of an easy, and more expensive way out, because it's a gourmet store -- not much is made in house. The store is awesome. Actually, their prices are not all that high. They have some incredible ricotta for $7.99/lb, whereas it costs $3-4/lb for some decidely less tasty versions made in little shops in the area.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(Queen rest. on Court St. is still king IMO).

Sorry, WBC. I've never tried the fresh mozzarella at either places. How is Queen Restaurant, btw?

If I was in the market for mozz in BK, I'd probably try Tuller, on Court Street. This is kind of an easy, and more expensive way out, because it's a gourmet store -- not much is made in house. The store is awesome. Actually, their prices are not all that high. They have some incredible ricotta for $7.99/lb, whereas it costs $3-4/lb for some decidely less tasty versions made in little shops in the area.

Queen is GREAT! Actually, everything I've had there has been excellent. It's a totally cheesy looking place inside - kind of like an old school Chinese restaurant decor. The pastas though are supberb - and the highlight is their fresh moz. appertizer. Its a ball of fresh mozz. served on a plate with grilled asparagus. Pretty pricey though - I think around $12. Actually, everything there is pricey but it is good. And the mozz. is the best I've ever had. They make in the kitchen twice daily. I recomend trying it at least once.

~WBC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...