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How to make perfect toast


badthings
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I like to go the zen method:

Be the toast.

Or the philosopher:

I think therefore I am toast.

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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To produce the patches of butter most people said they prefered, the bread needs to be heated to at least 120°C, and the butter should be used straight from the fridge, applied unevenly within two minutes of the bread coming out of the toaster. The amount of butter should be about one seventeenth the thickness of the bread

I'm not convinced. I don't think I'd get optimum enjoyment of my toast if I let it sit for up to two minutes and then put on butter straight from the fridge!?! And how are you going to slice solid cold butter 1/17th the thickness of the bread?

Squeat

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two things come to mind: :biggrin:

--i can't do all that math (the formula) every morning before making toast, and

--those who i know who hate cooking (their words) always use toast as the yardstick: if it takes longer to make than toast, they're not interested.

:wacko:

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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But I don't like partially melted butter on my toast. My goal with toast is to make sure that all the butter is melted before I start eating it. And hard butter is just wrong for toast -- it tears the bread.

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But I don't like partially melted butter on my toast. My goal with toast is to make sure that all the butter is melted before I start eating it. And hard butter is just wrong for toast -- it tears the bread.

I happen to like pats of butter on my toast. The trick, for me, is to apply thin pats spaced close enough together to insure a bite of butter with each bite of toast. Tearing is prevented by applying numerous pats and not trying to spread them. This is also one case where I prefer salted butter, the only case, in fact, that I can think of. I've tried melting the butter on the toast but you lose the crunchiness of the bread. I like the firmness and coolness of the pats of butter, contrasting with the crunchiness and heat of the toast. Hey, I've got this down "pat". (pun intended :rolleyes: )

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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I am not sure about the butter patch thing. Cold butter makes my teeth shiver. One of the best things about toast is the fact that it is warm! I like to apply the butter to my almost perfectly toasted toast in thin pats, and then put it briefly back into the toaster oven for melting and final perfect browning of the bread, which, after spreading the melted butter, results in a very thin even spread of butter on hot crispy toast. Mmmm...toast.

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But I don't like partially melted butter on my toast. My goal with toast is to make sure that all the butter is melted before I start eating it. And hard butter is just wrong for toast -- it tears the bread.

I happen to like pats of butter on my toast. The trick, for me, is to apply thin pats spaced close enough together to insure a bite of butter with each bite of toast. Tearing is prevented by applying numerous pats and not trying to spread them. This is also one case where I prefer salted butter, the only case, in fact, that I can think of. I've tried melting the butter on the toast but you lose the crunchiness of the bread. I like the firmness and coolness of the pats of butter, contrasting with the crunchiness and heat of the toast. Hey, I've got this down "pat". (pun intended :rolleyes: )

Oh yeah! Gotta have a bit of that "warm toast - cool butter" contrast. I totally agree that you don't want the butter to be completely warm and melted! Same goes for dinner rolls.

I know a man who gave up smoking, drinking, sex, and rich food. He was healthy right up to the day he killed himself. - Johnny Carson
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Just to add a bit of ethnic controversy, has anyone ever had decent toast in England? Think croutons with cold butter.

I grew up in the U.S., putting cold pats of butter on hot toast so that the pats partially melt and cool nubs of butter remain. The face of the toast gets softened by the butter. This is the way I always thought toast should be. Then I went to graduate school in England and had the "croutons" you refer to. I began to think that I had got it wrong all those years, since the English must be the world's authority on toast. Are they not?

I still prefer the toast of my childhood, but I can't help but have a niggling feeling that, the way I make it, it is not true toast -- not English toast.

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When I think Toast and England in the same phrase... I remember waiting at the corner shop at just the right time for the hot baguettes to be brought out. Racing through checkout, back to my flat, cracking it open, still steaming and slathering that bad boy with butter and wolfing it down. No toaster necessary. Hot bread + fresh cold butter = Yum.

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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