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Lord Michael Lewis

Absinthe: The Topic

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Another absinthe-focused sour that I'm quite fond of (and which calls specifically for St. George) is the Peychaud Sour:

1 oz Peychaud's Bitters

1 oz St. George Absinthe

.75 oz Lemon

.5 oz Simple

1 Egg White

Lemon Twist (Garnish)

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Chris Hannah's Necromancer with absinthe verte (St. George), still water, violet liqueur (R&W), and a few dashes of Peychaud's bitters (optional).

 

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That one was a bit hard to take a first because of its intensity. I liked it better with more dilution from the ice. Basically it's an Absinthe Frappée with violet as the sweetener. It was interesting to see the flavor evolve from all licorice (the Peychaud's reinforcing that first impression), to more floral flavors with the violet helping.

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That looks more interesting than the corpse reviver variations I've seen using the name.  Same ratios as the Absinthe Frappée?

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The book (Absinthe Cocktails, which I recommend if you like absinthe) calls for 1.5 oz absinthe verte, 0.5 oz water (which I would increase to 1 oz), 1/2 oz violet liqueur or creme Yvette (you may have to adjust based on what you are using), and a "garnish" of Peychaud's bitters (1 dash) and flowers.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Trying again to revive the corpse, this time with Greg Best's Re-Animator (not to be confused with Audrey Saunders' creation of the same name). Equal parts absinthe verte (St. George), American dry gin (Blue Coat or Aviation were specified, I used Dorothy Parker), Cointreau, lemon juice (barspoon).

 

Better use an absinthe you really love, because there is a full ounce of it in the drink. There is a hint of louche but barely. The alcohol content is quite high.

 

After the shock of the first sip, you start tasting things other than just the absinthe, although the Cointreau remains remarkably subdued. It's pretty good version of the CR2 on steroids, and a slow sipper for sure.

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Night Porter (Jeff Hollinger) with white vermouth (Dolin), absinthe (St George), port (used a tawny port but ruby was specified), mezcal (Vida).

Another polarizing yet fascinating drink. At first the absinthe dominates everyting. Intense black licorice aroma. Then the wine comes through, followed by nuts; a ton of herbs from the vermouth and the absinthe start to intermingle, and the finish is more licorice and smoke. A bit too much for me. 

 

 

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Misty Kalkofen's Hôtel Haute-Savoie: rye (Rittenhouse), St Germain, dry vermouth (Dolin), absinthe (St George), Angostura bitters, orange bitters (Regan's).

 

This cocktail is based on the Lawhill Cocktail from the Savoy Cocktail book, substituting St Germain for the maraschino liqueur, and altering the ratios.

 

I was expecting this to be on the sweet side, and it was, but not overly so as the absinthe tended to neutralize some of the sweetness. What I did not expect was, after the herbal aromas from the absinthe and vermouth (which blended very harmoniously in the cocktail), to have these incredible chocolate notes. Such a good cocktail with the Rittenhouse rye.

 

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I've added this to Kindred, FP (got in before Rafa - is this a record?).

 

Sounds really nice; I'm enjoying a good old G&T right now, but maybe later ...

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