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Infusions, Extractions & Tinctures at Home: The Topic (Part 1)

490 posts in this topic

Thanks Matt, I remember you suggesting that in another thread you were helping me out in (the starter home cocktail bar thread). I'd already planned on taking that suggestion. The local LCBO doesn't stock it but one about 5 hours away does so I should be able to arrange it. This was really more just a curiosity thing as to what I might end up with if I tried it. I felt pretty confident when asking that it was a silly question but once I started thinking about it, I had to ask. I'm sure it would be something entirely unlike anything resembling rye (except maybe in the most literal sense that it might pick up the actual flavor of the grain) but curiosity gets the best of me sometimes (ok, way too often).


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I've been thinking about getting a centrifugal or masticating juicer, like the ones they use at juice shops like Jamba Juice. The resulting juice I could drink or make into a syrup (by freeze reduction), but would it be possible to use the leftover pulp to make an infusion?

It seems ideal as the surface area is very high; maybe you could even do an infusion in just a day or two. Most of the liquid has been squeezed out so it won't decrease your ABV.

Of course this would be best with fruits in which the pulp is completely edible/desirable like pineapple or strawberry, as opposed to something like pomegranate.

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I've been thinking about getting a centrifugal or masticating juicer, like the ones they use at juice shops like Jamba Juice. The resulting juice I could drink or make into a syrup (by freeze reduction), but would it be possible to use the leftover pulp to make an infusion?

It seems ideal as the surface area is very high; maybe you could even do an infusion in just a day or two. Most of the liquid has been squeezed out so it won't decrease your ABV.

Of course this would be best with fruits in which the pulp is completely edible/desirable like pineapple or strawberry, as opposed to something like pomegranate.

i swear by the acme centrifugal juicers. they are built like tanks and can be had used on ebay cheaply. the problem i've had with the leftover pulp is that it ends up being higher in pectin than the juice and precipitates in your infusion.

the acme juicer gets a 99% yield with pomegranites. it does break the seeds but i don't think it necessarily makes the juice more tannic than a citrus press would. i've come to positively regard the tannin. it adds a little structure to things while never being an obtrusive distraction.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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I regularly have a shot of tequila next to my plate whenever I make tortillas with fresh masa, and I had a few left over from the most recent batch. It got me thinking: what would a tortilla-infused tequila be like?

Tortilla Tequila

300 ml tequila (I used Lunazul blanco, but I'll bet Ilegal, Chinaco, or Herradura añejo would be splendid)

4 homemade tortillas from fresh nixtamal (NOT from masa harina)

Mince tortillas and add to tequila. Infuse for 24h; strain.

Made a Cardinal Ximénez tonight, a fine drink indeed: but the mind reels at the possibilities.....


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I regularly have a shot of tequila next to my plate whenever I make tortillas with fresh masa, and I had a few left over from the most recent batch. It got me thinking: what would a tortilla-infused tequila be like?

Tortilla Tequila

300 ml tequila (I used Lunazul blanco, but I'll bet Ilegal, Chinaco, or Herradura añejo would be splendid)

4 homemade tortillas from fresh nixtamal (NOT from masa harina)

Mince tortillas and add to tequila. Infuse for 24h; strain.

Made a Cardinal Ximénez tonight, a fine drink indeed: but the mind reels at the possibilities.....

Sounds intriguing. I wonder if the remains would make a good tortilla soup.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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i swear by the acme centrifugal juicers. they are built like tanks and can be had used on ebay cheaply. the problem i've had with the leftover pulp is that it ends up being higher in pectin than the juice and precipitates in your infusion.

Does the pectin turn it into a jelly, or are there other problems?

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I regularly have a shot of tequila next to my plate whenever I make tortillas with fresh masa, and I had a few left over from the most recent batch. It got me thinking: what would a tortilla-infused tequila be like?

Tortilla Tequila

300 ml tequila (I used Lunazul blanco, but I'll bet Ilegal, Chinaco, or Herradura añejo would be splendid)

4 homemade tortillas from fresh nixtamal (NOT from masa harina)

Mince tortillas and add to tequila. Infuse for 24h; strain.

Made a Cardinal Ximénez tonight, a fine drink indeed: but the mind reels at the possibilities.....

chris, i love the idea. whats it like. the aroma of tequila juxtaposed with corn?

are you ending up with any hard to clarify solids or strange PH sensations? it seems like a good candidate for redistillation.

i've never worked with nixtamal and i'm not sure in what form you buy it, but if you can give me some more pointers i'd love to join the experimenting.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i swear by the acme centrifugal juicers. they are built like tanks and can be had used on ebay cheaply. the problem i've had with the leftover pulp is that it ends up being higher in pectin than the juice and precipitates in your infusion.

Does the pectin turn it into a jelly, or are there other problems?

i've had batches of strawberry infused tequila that have jellied. and i've had lots of batches of dried cranberry infused tequila that develops lots of pectin flecks. i think the difference is the final alcohol content with the flecks developing at higher levels.

the acme juicer is known for aerating juices but i've finally got a food saver with the canning jar attachment so i'm going to experiment vacuuming things like pineapple juice to de-gas it. i'm really curious what the results will be for things like apple juice.

if i can juice the apples really fast via basket press or acme, add ascorbic acid, and de-gas can i retain their color?


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i've never worked with nixtamal and i'm not sure in what form you buy it, but if you can give me some more pointers i'd love to join the experimenting.

There's a rundown of the process on the Cooking Issues blog.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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chris, i love the idea. whats it like. the aroma of tequila juxtaposed with corn?

are you ending up with any hard to clarify solids or strange PH sensations? it seems like a good candidate for redistillation.

On the aroma: yes, more or less. It's well tequila (Lunazul blanco), which doesn't have much aroma to begin with, so the corn dominates. I'd love to try it with a quality añejo.

On solids: it's definitely cloudy, and I'm allowing the two 150ml bottles to sit a spell to see if it clarifies at all. I may also run it through the Buchner funnel if I feel sufficiently motivated.

Not sure about the PH sensations, but I'll report back after a taste tonight.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Noting that I did read andiesenji's posts on using dried peaches, I am wondering if there are any issues with using fresh peaches or apricots in an infusion?

Just got to thinking about the chalkiness that they can have in ice cream/sorbet and was wondering if that also affected infusing.

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I have found certain sediment-type clouding agents to be more or less un-filterable without a centrifuge. My parents have aged our Fish House Punch for a year before drinking it since, well, before I was born. The cloudy sediment from the lemon juice is only practicably filterable to a certain extent, and they have taken to decanting the clear liquor off the lees, filtering the next "layer" through a coffee filter and saving the rest for batch centrifuging every few years. Perhaps one could filter out the cloudy sediment with infinite patience and an infinite number of Büchner filter papers, or using a diatomaceous earth filter or something like that, but it doesn't seem likely to be a very profitable expenditure of effort and time. The sediment, by the way, is far too fine to be held out with a Superbag or anything like that. I wonder if gelatin or agar syneresis clarification might work for this sort of thing...


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Parents. Centrifuge. Fish House Punch. Aged one year. Since before you were born.

My head is spinning. My parents got "fancy" around the holidays by making Old Fashions.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Bentonite fining can work wonders on a cloudy product. It's dirt cheap (pardon the pun), and I've yet to experience any loss of flavor or color.


"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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Parents. Centrifuge. Fish House Punch. Aged one year. Since before you were born.

My head is spinning. My parents got "fancy" around the holidays by making Old Fashions.

I have to agree. But this certainly explains a lot to me about Sam and his sense of precision with cocktails and all manner of home prepared delicacies. That gene clearly doesn't skip a generation... :biggrin:


Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

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Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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No, just sedimentary settling over time (works ok) and using a pump, a Buchner filter, and an Erlenmeyer flask (nope). You?

So, as promised...

Oh yes, I have the remedy, will reveal all tomorrow...

albeit I'm a couple of days late, apologies. Should you wish to easily remove any/all sediment and you don't have access to (expensive) filtering equipment you will want to make up a clarifying powder consisting of;

2 parts egg white powder

2 parts milk sugar (lactose)

1 part potato starch

Add 1/4 ounce of this powder to every litre of liquid that you wish to clarify and shake vigorously. Put the liquid into a warm room for a day or two, agitating regularly. Within minutes you will see the louche dropping out of suspension and settling at the bottom of your macerating container. After around 24-48 hours (longer may be required) filter through coffee filter paper.

As I understand it...

Fining agents work on the principle that all of the particles responsible for the louche, clouding or haze have an electrical charge. As an example egg white has a positive charge meaning that it can attract negatively charged materials. In binding to the negatively charged materials the combined weight increases resulting in settling to occur. In practice it’s usually necessary to have finings agents of different charges added.

With that in mind the powder above calls for both negative and positive clarifying agents;

Egg white (positive)

Milk sugar (negative)

Potato starch (negative)

which will ensure that all sediment can easily be filtered. As mentioned by jmfangio, Bentonite (negative) can also work but it won't work in every case unless mixed with something that has a positive charge.

I'm no scientist so the explanations above may not be accurate but I can assure you the powder works and is great for clarifying small batches of liqueurs/bitters/tinctures/etc that have developed a louche/haze.


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