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Bolivar Petit Corona

All About Bourbon Whiskey

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Money is no object = Distiller's Masterpiece, Pappy Van Winkle Family Reserve 23 year old (haven't actually tasted this one myself, just heard about the legendary taste from other Bourbophilic friends)

out of curiosity: just how little of an object is money with these labels? are there bourbons that command the super premium (>$1000 per bottle) that some scotches do?

Mongo:

Both the Distiller's Masterpiece (which is aged for 20 years in port wine casks and has Daryl Groom, Geyser Peak winemaker consulting on the project) and the Pappy Van Winkle Family Reserve are both in the $250-$275 range depending on where you buy it. That's about the most expensive bourbon I've ever seen and I don't think there's anything that's considered better. These are much more akin to a fine Cognac than what most folks think of as bourbon.

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I'm looking for some Bulleit Bourbon, as a gift for someone. I've been having trouble finding it, though, so I was wondering if help was available here.

I live in the middle of nowhere (Upper peninsula of Michigan), so my local access to spirits is limited to what you can find in a supermarket. Can anyone render assistance?

Thanks.

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Inexpensive but excellent quality = Evan Williams 7 year old

I just stumbled across this thread a few days ago, and was intrigued by the suggestion. I had always considered Evan Williams (and some other 1.75 liter bottlings) to be of, hrmmm, questionable quality.

Well, I saw the Evan Williams 7 y.o. advertised in the Sunday local RiteAid flyer. Twelve bucks for a jug. Had to go out and pick some up, and you know what? It's purdy damn good! Definitely worth adding to the bar...

P.S. It was named as the "Value Whiskey of the Year" by Malt Advocate Magazine.

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It can be purchased and shipped to Michigan (a permitted state, unless that has changed recently) from these folks.

I've no affiliation or experience with them as oHIo does not permit mail order booze, but I do not agree that they classify Tennessee Whiskey as a sub-category of Bourbon!

Good luck. And welcome to eG freakazoid314. :smile:

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I live in the middle of nowhere (Upper peninsula of Michigan), so my local access to spirits is limited to what you can find in a supermarket. Can anyone render assistance?

This is different from the nowhere you lived in in Nebraska?

Welcome to eG!

Oh, and to render assistants, first you need to cube them and place them into a large, heated vessel. One of your rocket engines should work.

:laugh:

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Inexpensive but excellent quality = Evan Williams 7 year old

I just stumbled across this thread a few days ago, and was intrigued by the suggestion. I had always considered Evan Williams (and some other 1.75 liter bottlings) to be of, hrmmm, questionable quality.

Well, I saw the Evan Williams 7 y.o. advertised in the Sunday local RiteAid flyer. Twelve bucks for a jug. Had to go out and pick some up, and you know what? It's purdy damn good! Definitely worth adding to the bar...

P.S. It was named as the "Value Whiskey of the Year" by Malt Advocate Magazine.

Hi Joe:

Welcome!

I'm a frugal shopper on many levels and for the obvious reasons both professionally and for "recreational use". The Evan Williams 7 yr. old is about the best "well" bourbon I've tried. I prefer it for mixing with Coke or ginger ale, and drink the higher end bourbons when making Manhattans or sipping on the rocks. Also only when I can afford them! :raz:

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I'm a frugal shopper on many levels and for the obvious reasons both professionally and for "recreational use".

Ah, great minds shop alike! I'm always searching for things that offer great bang-for-the-buck, yet aren't crap. Evan Williams sure ain't crap. Better than some at twice the price (750 ml, of course).

Thanks for the heads up!

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This is different from the nowhere you lived in in Nebraska?

Yes, this is different from the nowhere I lived in, in Nebraska. Up here (get it? U.P.? Nevermind) I am even farther beyond the 'middle of nowhere.' But up here i'm ten miles from a big fricking lake. People up here also seem to appreciate beer a lot more.

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It can be purchased and shipped to Michigan (a permitted state, unless that has changed recently) from these

Gosh darn it, they can't ship to Michigan.

I remember something like this, there's a place right across the border in Wisconsin that makes mead; really good stuff, too. They can't ship to Michigan though because of the laws. Only way to get it is to actually go there.

I guess I'll just have to wait on the Bulleit then. Anyone know of somewhere in the Cleveland area that sells it? I'm making a trip down there in a couple weeks...

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Oops. A late close last night (yeah!) and I missed the wee word "not." :blink: My apologies.

In my current OLBA oHIo Wholesale Price List I see a "Bullett" Bourbon listed as something that is available for sale, but is that a rip off on Bulleit? I'm not sure as we don't order that in so I'll be sure to ask our very helpful fellas at our designated, licensed and distributing liquor store. I honestly have never seen a bottle of Bullett or Bulleit in any local Cleveland (or oHIo for that matter -- I do visit Sandusky/Marble Head/Catawba/Port Clinton and Columbus often) liquor store. However, then again a liquor store tends to offer what sells in the area they are located, and I've seen a few typos in the OLBA publication from time, too.

I'll ask and post back. :smile:

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I have maintained for a while that B-F's claims about letting people know that Woodford Reserve is not made at Labrot & Graham is bogus.

I have to disagree. At least on my visit a couple of years ago, the tour guide made it very clear that the bourbon being sold was not distilled there and was a select batch of Old Forester. He even created some anticipation for when the first site-made barrels would be tapped. I wonder, however, as L&G began to market at the Kentucky Derby, etc... that policies changed to imply a greater heritage.

My belated choices:

1. Woodford Reserve

2. Bookers

3. Wild Turkey, 80

4. MM

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Katie,

I wonder what it tatses like but cannot ever imagine paying $250 for a bottle of bourbon. Or even having a manhatan made with it. Is that a $50 dollar cocktail? I adore bourbon and I wonder if that stuff even tastes like bourbon. Perhaps my palette is not developed enough but if I want cognac I will order it. This is not meant to be some reverse snobbery polemic but to me bourbon should taste like the corn and the earth. This sounds pretentious a little but I always think when I taste an oyster I taste the sea. When I taste bourbon I taste the earth. If it is as refined as cognac I fear that taste may be lost.

Having said all this I would like a taste. If someone can e-mail me a ounce or two I would let you know if I do like it

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In case anyone is interested, the 2004 Brown Spirits winners from the San Francisco World Spirits Competition (flash site) can be found here.

I realize it's just another competition (and a short-lived one at that), but I found the following noteworthy:

DOUBLE GOLD

BEST BOURBON - Old Forester Small Batch Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($15)

GOLD

Evan Williams Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, Kentucky, USA ($12)

Virginia Gentleman Small Batch Bourbon, USA ($20)

SILVER

Jim Beam Black Label Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($18)

Knob Creek Small Batch Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($26)

Van Winkle Family Reserve Single Barrel American Whiskey, Kentucky, USA ($85)

BRONZE

Basil Hayden's Small Batch Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($32)

Jim Beam White Label Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($13)

Maker's Mark Small Batch Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($20)

Old Forester Straight Bourbon, Kentucky, USA ($12)

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I radically cut back on my alcohol intake a few years ago, and decided, well, if I'm going to drink less, I'm going to try my damnedest to enjoy it more.

So I embarked on a gradual study of small-batch bourbons.

I really must not have much of a palate for liquor, though, as I couldn't tell a huge difference between the high-dollar bottles I was tippling from and my old reliable Maker's Mark or Wild Turkey.

So these days, my bourbon of choice is actually Maker's.

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I recently discovered Eagle Rare. A great buy at $19.99 and full of vanilla and caramel. Great for sipping. I splurged $40 on a bottle of Bookers, to be really disappointed. Too powerful to sip, needs a lot of cutting. I heard Willie Nelson took over a bourbon Co, anyone know the name?

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I vote for Woodford Reserve myself. It's the first bottle I reach for when grabbing bourbon in the cupboard. Sometimes, I go for Makers Mark as that is right behind Woodford Reserve as a favorite... very close.

I still prefer a few sips of Lagavulin 16yr or Balvenie 12yr Doublewood over anything else, though.

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Katie,

I wonder what it tatses like but cannot ever imagine paying $250 for a bottle of bourbon. Or even having a manhatan made with it. Is that a $50 dollar cocktail? I adore bourbon and I wonder if that stuff even tastes like bourbon. Perhaps my palette is not developed enough but if I want cognac I will order it. This is not meant to be some reverse snobbery polemic but to me bourbon should taste like the corn and the earth. This sounds pretentious a little but I always think when I taste an oyster I taste the sea. When I taste bourbon I taste the earth. If it is as refined as cognac I fear that taste may be lost.

Having said all this I would like a taste. If someone can e-mail me a ounce or two I would let you know if I do like it

Mike:

Sorry it's taken me so long to reply. I just saw the thread again and realized the discussion had continued...

Honestly the super high end bourbon is no different than super high end single malt scotch or super high end cognac. It's very smooth and refined, and most certainly meant for sipping neat or perhaps on the rocks at most. Definitely would be a travesty to mix it into a cocktail. Much like a chef friend of mine that once killed a bottle of Remy Extra making stingers out of it :blink: Sacre Bleu! It's still about corn and barrel but much classier. Believe me if you've tasted one of these, you'd see the difference in quality from the extra aging and blending that goes into the upper echelon products. And heck - it's still cheaper than the high end single malts and Cognacs are! Last time I checked a bottle of Louis XIII was over $1100!!!

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While not a newcomer to drinking (being 52 and having started young) I am a newcomer to Bourbon. While I've cooked with bourbon for years it wasn't until I bought my son a bottle for his 22nd birthday (nope, didn't try it when I got him a bottle at 21) that I started drinking the stuff myself.

In terms of whiskey I was a Scotch man. I think many ( I sure was one) prefer one or the other but not both. While my son likes Makers Mark or Booker's, I wound up buying him a bottle of George Dickell 12 year old and getting myself a bottle. Since that time (last Novemer) I've been drinking and enjoying bourbon as well as Rye. Still though I haven't found a better bottle for the price than George Dickell 12 year old, and their 8 year old is also good and lower priced.

For cooking, and at a reasonable price Early Times has seemed to work well and is not unpleasant on its own. (I only drink bourbon, or scotch for that matter -other than single malt) straigt up on the rocks or with a splash of water.

From what I've read on this thread I think I'll pick up a bottle of the Evan Williams to try for cooking and that occasional extra nip now and then.

Another that I like is Old Overholt Rye whiskey. Perhaps on vacation I'll toss down the ducats to try the Van Winkle which I'm also interested in.

I do wonder, and would like to hear, how many people are primarily just scotch or just bourbon, as well as how common the crossovers are. After my bourbon baptism and rebirth via Geoge D, I seldom find myself having or considering a glass of scotch even.

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I recently purchased a small production single-barrel bourbon, Eagle Rare 10 year old, at Martin Wine Cellar in New Orleans. This particular batch was specifically selected and produced for this particular wine/liquor store, and they are the exclusive distributor of it in Louisiana.

gallery_2_1277_37449.jpg

Its definitely one of the best and smoothest bourbons I have ever tasted. Martin still has a number of cases of it left. At $24 a bottle its a great buy as well.

http://www.alcoholreviews.com/SPIRITS/bourbons-rare.shtml

http://www.martinwine.com/

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I recently purchased a small production single-barrel bourbon, Eagle Rare 10 year old, at Martin Wine Cellar  in New Orleans. This particular batch was specifically selected and produced for this particular wine/liquor store, and they are the exclusive distributor of it in Louisiana.

I love, and greatly miss, Martin Wine Cellar. There's nothing like it in college town Indiana. A surprising amount of my alcohol preferences were formed or furthered at Martin -- not to mention my love of Scharffenberger chocolate bars with cacao nibs.

Coincidentally, when I saw this thread I clicked on it to add that Eagle Rare 10 year and Blanton's have joined forces to make me question my status as a Scotch drinker. I think bourbon is winning out -- the Blanton's is as good, at LEAST as good, as Scotches I've paid three times as much for; the Eagle Rare is not only one of my favorite <$25 liquors, it's become my favorite alcohol to cook with. Bourbon brownies and bourbon demiglace-based sauces have become staples in my kitchen, and only the strong suspicion that I'd need to buy another bottle immediately has stopped me from trying it in a bourbon ice cream.

I recommend the Buffalo Trace distillery tour to anyone who's out in the area (a little ways out from Louisville) -- if I close my eyes, I can still smell the barrels aging in the warehouse.

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and only the strong suspicion that I'd need to buy another bottle immediately has stopped me from trying it in a bourbon ice cream.

Bread Pudding with a Bourbon Vanilla Sauce, man:

gallery_2_0_87690.jpg

I had this last week at Pampy's in New Orleans.

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