Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Bolivar Petit Corona

All About Bourbon Whiskey

Recommended Posts

Okay... recently some one gave me some Jim Beam Black Label. I fully expected it to suck, but it didn't. Has anyone else tried this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best Bourbon I have ever had was A.H. Hirsch, which I have been told is no longer made! I've only ever had it by the glass (at around $20!) but it was worth it. Henry Clay Reserve 18 yr. old is also mighty fine as well. Though knocked a bit here, my bottle of 19 yr. old W.L. Weller has been mighty fine as well. I have not enjoyed my bottle of 17 yr. old Eagle Rare NEARLY as much. In a pinch, Woodford Reserve is pretty good. Be this as it may, I must say though that Bourbon pails in comparison to a good single malt Scotch whisky (in my humble opinion).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two bourbons are currently "rocking my world"

Hancocks and Bulleit. Both I believe are from Frankfort and are single barrel bourbons.

Amazing depth of flavours and both work incredibly well in my drink of drinks, a well made old fashioned

S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The best Bourbon I have ever had was A.H. Hirsch, which I have been told is no longer made!

The guy at the wine store I shop at is selling the AH Hirsch. He said that Hirsch bought an old distellery where the bourbon had just been sitting around for over ten years.

More Here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simon, where did you find the Bulleit. I used to pick it up at Oddbins but they told me they arent stocking it anymore. They used to have really good deals on it.

Have you found the Hancocks anywhere by the bottle (or just byt the cocktai-ful). My father in law brings me a bottle everytime he comes out from the States but I have never seen it here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quajolote, thanks for the article, it confirms my belief that Hirsch is the best. But alas, soon to be gone forever? Please tell me the name, address and phone # of the wine store you know of selling Hirsch so I can contact them and get some before it dwindles completely. Thanks! David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

David:

We have the Hirsch 16 and 20 year old at the bar here at Striped Bass. They are $16.00 and $22.00 respectively. So when are you coming in to see me???? :wink:

Hugs,

Katie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Two bourbons are currently "rocking my world"

Hancocks and Bulleit.  Both I believe are from Frankfort and are single barrel bourbons.

Amazing depth of flavours and both work incredibly well in my drink of drinks, a well made old fashioned

S

As they should. Those are both very amazing and very hard to find bourbons. I believe that both are in fact distilled and aged over in Franklin County. Buffalo Trace is another good'un from our state's capitol!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quajolote, thanks for the article, it confirms my belief that Hirsch is the best. But alas, soon to be gone forever? Please tell me the name, address and phone # of the wine store you know of selling Hirsch so I can contact them and get some before it dwindles completely. Thanks! David

Fine Wine Brokers

4621 North Lincoln Avenue, Chicago, IL

phone: 773-989-8166

The proprieters name is Jerry (actually Gerhard, it is a German neighborhood), he is there Tue-Sat from 11-7

They do have a mail order business so getting some shipped should be no problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This discussion has made very interesting reading, and also provided me the right idea for Valentine's Day -- I'll be getting a bottle of Maker's Mark, which I know he hasn't tried, for the Consort, who relies on bourbon in his repertoire of late-night drinkies. Thank you, all.

I only very occasionally drink Bourbon, but I love to cook with it. It is so good for deglazing and making a little pan sauce.

Trader Joe's here in Southern California often has Rebel Yell astonishingly cheaply. It's what I often have in the cabinet, and I suppose price and proximity have something to do with that, but it also has the Best Bourbon Name, too good to be true, really.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I nice cold weather toddy,

Warm apple cider with cinnamon stick and a good splash of Makers Mark ( not heated too much.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I only very occasionally drink Bourbon, but I love to cook with it.  It is so good for deglazing and making a little pan sauce.

Yes!

A great sauce for pork is to sear your meat in a saute pan. Remove to a warm platter. Add shallots to the pan and soften. Add a few green peppercorns. Add Makers Mark (watch the flame!) , deglaze and scrape up all the brown bits from the pork, add Tbsp of dijon, lower heat, finish with cream. This makes a luscious sauce for any type of pork.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I only very occasionally drink Bourbon, but I love to cook with it.  It is so good for deglazing and making a little pan sauce.

Yes!

A great sauce for pork is to sear your meat in a saute pan. Remove to a warm platter. Add shallots to the pan and soften. Add a few green peppercorns. Add Makers Mark (watch the flame!) , deglaze and scrape up all the brown bits from the pork, add Tbsp of dijon, lower heat, finish with cream. This makes a luscious sauce for any type of pork.

Yes, Ron (excepting the Maker's Mark part -- YET). A method, a model for us all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure Simon has a great recipe, but while we wait for him to chime in, I'll give you the Kentucky version.

Muddle one orange slice, one maraschino cherry, one teaspoon of super-fine sugar, a splash of bitters, and a splash of bourbon in the bottom of a highball glass until juicy. Fill the glass with crushed ice. Add two parts bourbon to one part water and stir. never, ever, use soda water. garnish with half orange slice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am sure Simon has a great recipe, but while we wait for him to chime in, I'll give you the Kentucky version.

Muddle one orange slice, one maraschino cherry, one teaspoon of super-fine sugar, a splash of bitters, and a splash of bourbon in the bottom of a highball glass until juicy.  Fill the glass with crushed ice.  Add two parts bourbon to one part water and stir.  never, ever, use soda water.  garnish with half orange slice.

Mine are the same, but I add a lemon slice to the orange slice. We had these for Thanksgiving, and everyone enjoyed themselves the rest of the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed a couple of people saying that Booker's was too hot to drink straight.

If you let a bourbon sit (breathe) for a decent bit before adding ice, some of the alcohol will evaporate off and it'll make for easier drinking.

Not sure how this affects the flavor (i.e., if it deteriorates or develops different flavor notes)... any experts out there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...If you let a bourbon sit (breathe) for a decent bit before adding ice, some of the alcohol will evaporate off and it'll make for easier drinking....

Huh?

And exactly how long are you intending a "decent bit" to be? Yes, Alcohol will evaporate (slightly) quicker then the water that is in the bourbon, but I expect you would need to wait quite a while for the alcoholic content to be noticeably lower.

If you want to "lower the proof" of your bourbon, you would be far better advised to simply add a splash of water or an ice cube.

Just as an example, take some everclear sometime and let it "sit for a decent bit", and notice how long it takes a noticeable amount of it to evaporate.

And the alcohol within bourbon (or any other 80-100 proof spirit) will take even longer to evaporate because the alcohol and water aren't "separate" components in the product, but in fact are interacting with one another and so the "alcohol" will evaporate slower.

It is also a common myth that "cooking" something with alcohol will cause all of the alcohol to evaporate. Many feel that even in a "flambe" that when the flames disappear, all of the alcohol is gone. (I've heard professional chef's even make this claim). Tests have been done that prove that this is not the case. Even a long slow cooking of a stew that uses wine will not cook out all of the alcohol.

-Robert Hess

www.DrinkBoy.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried most of the bourbons mentioned here. I think the Hirsch is interesting due to its complexity, but overall, I find the Pappy Van Winkle's Family Reserve to be my favorite. It is interesting like the Hirsch, but to me, smoother and more elegant. It still has the heat, but with less bite. It has a rich, "caramel-y" character. It comes in a 20 year old and a 23 year old variety. The 23 year old costs about double that of the 20 year old. There is a noticeable difference; but the difference does not necessarily make it any better. It is darker and sweeter. The difference certainly does not justify the extra price.

For a less expensive bourbon than the Van Winkle's Reserve, I would recommend the Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit. It is half the price of the Pappy Van Winkle's Family Reserve 20 year old version and still world class. The Booker's is nice, but hot, with a unique "orange" character to the after taste. It is best served with ice and left to sit for a few minutes or cut with a little water.

For everyday drinking, I don't think you can do any better than Maker's Mark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bvus, for everyday drinking try W.L. Weller 7 summers old, you'll like it better than makers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll try it. Much appreciated.

Here's the site address for more info. on the Van Winkle's products (and the other products in their line) that I mentioned:

Van Winkle Bourbons

(Note coincidentally that Van Winkle originally produced W.L. Weller and that Van Winkle now has partnered with the company that now produces Weller).


Edited by bvus (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second (third, fourth, whatever!) all the commendations of Weller's 7-year-old. For the price, you won't do better, and it's approachable for a newcomer to bourbons with its brown sugar/molasses motif. (It's a wheat -- not rye -- flavored whiskey, as is Maker's Mark, Old Rip Van Winkle standard, Old Fitzgerald.)

Also, some references for the A.H. Hirsch aficianados (which includes me):

The Hirsch Reserve bourbons (both 16- and 20-year-olds) are the remainders from the now-defunct Michter's Distillery in Shaefferstown, PA, which closed in 1988. Adolf Hirsch (a KY gent) purchased the barrels, which were distilled in 1974, and placed them in stainless steel (at two different times, thus the two ages of bourbon), essentially stopping the aging process. They've been released sporadically since (I have three bottles of the 16-year-old, with two different labels, though the info and the contents are the same). The whiskey stores are now under the aegis of Preiss Imports of California (see www. preissimports.com to discover your state's distributor). The last reference from Mr. Preiss I've seen indicated there is less than a year's supply of the 20-year-old left, with about quintuple that for the 16-year-old. After that, there ain't no mo'. I've purchased the 16-year-old from $50-$75 (per 4/5 quart, or .750L), and seen the 20-year-old at around $125. It'll only get dearer, I suspect.

Michter's was the only post-Prohibition distillery to reopen using a copper pot still (like the Scots use). It was also small-batch, since it was a small still. (Labrot & Graham will market a pot-stilled bourbon this year, but the triple stills are 30-feet tall). If you know of an old-timey liquor store, go sort through the dusty bottles in the corner and just pray you happen across an original old, forgotten Michter's bottle (or, more likely, ceramic jug). Buy it at whatever cost. Smile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×