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corokke


torakris
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Oh, and my least favorite korokke ever were filled with a hard-boiled egg. I think I might be willing to try them with uzura-tamago, but I just couldn't handle a big egg and a thin layer of potatoes.

I think this is actually one of my favorite kinds of korokke... I had it for the first time in a restaurant, and today made some of my own with a mixture of about 3/4 kabocha, 1/4 satsuma imo on the outside. They turned out really well!

What do you usually use as condiments with korokke? I like a combo of Japanese mayo and tonkatsu sauce. That chutney looks like a good idea too.

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Made a giant batch of korokke...

I double boiled the potatoes a la Jackal, curious to see if it makes a difference.

helenjp--

i'm curious; what is this 'double-boiled' potato? i'm assuming you mean Jackal10, the eGullet member, suggested this? i can't imagine what it would entail.

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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Curses, now I can't remember the details either...ah here it is!

I think that variety of potato used is the most important thing, ensuring that you drive enough moisture out of the mash before adding the other ingredients is the 2nd priority, and arcane methodology is probably not a bad thing...but I don't know if I'd resort to it regularly unless the type of potato I was using produced a very gluey mash. I use the Japanese danshaku variety for korokke, and find it satisfactory.

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  • 1 year later...

I've never used a recipe exactly, but you basically need cooked kabocha and cooked potatoes. If you can't find kabocha, use a nutty, mealy variety of squash like butternut squash, rather than a more watery variety.

I usually use about 60% kabocha to 40% potato.

Use a potato ricer to mash the potato when it has cooled to between 140-160F. (60-70C) The kabocha is less temperature sensitive, but try to mash it while it's still warm. Add salt and blend the ingredients together. You may like to add a little shredded pork, but most kabocha korokke that I've seen in Japan were actually vegetarian, which isn't true for most other varieties.

I typically refrigerate this mixture overnight because it's easier to shape when chilled. If I'm in a hurry, I at least try to bring them down to room temperature.

Form into balls, dip in flour, a cold egg-water wash, then panko. Fry at 375F/190C until deep golden brown.

If freezing, flatten the balls to an oval shape about 1cm/a shy half inch. You may want to fry then at closer to 360F/180C because frozen ones tend to brown faster than they cook inside.

I am bumping this. Does anyone have recipe for kabocha corokke? Also, am i be able to substitute the kabocha with pumpkin since I am not in Japan.

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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Firstly,

Congratulations Helen on the Host news ! Great to see.

Secondly, the cream chicken korokke recipe you posted is very similar to my best friend's recipe (she's Dutch) but I can't wait to try the long-simmer method for the panada.

Thirdly, I'm glad to have found Tokyo-mart so I can get some real panko to use !! (I'm off to post a thread about this now...)

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  • 1 month later...
I just saw this video:
and I thought "aren't they a bit big?"

Is this the usual size for korokke or is this guy really hungry ?

The six korokke are of different sizes! I don't think any of them are particularly big. What size do you think is right for korokke? I have seen bigger menchi katsu. "Cream korokke" are usually smaller in size and cylindrical in shape, though.

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The six korokke are of different sizes!  I don't think any of them are particularly big.  What size do you think is right for korokke?  I have seen bigger menchi katsu.  "Cream korokke" are usually smaller in size and cylindrical in shape, though.

Ahhh.. I've seen the cylindrical ones, the flat oval ones not quite as big as the ones in the video, and the small round flattened ones.

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I think I use about 3-4 tablespoons of potato for my Japanese style croquettes. They're typically about the size of what I could cup between my hands, or a bit smaller than that, which is consistent with the video.

They might look a bit large set against typical Japanese kitchen equipment... the cutting boards I've used in Japan were tiny compared to what I use in Seattle.

German croquettes, which are relatively minimally seasoned, are about half the typical Japanese size.

Okara croquettes and cream croquettes are sometimes a bit smaller.

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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What is the first thing that the cook sauteed? Is it mushroom? They looked very nice when finished?

Onion and minced meat, with salt and pepper. So says the narrator.

When I was small, my mother used to tell me that korokke were meat-less and menchi katsu (or menchi for short) had meat in them.

I must say I can get nostalgic for those korokke that seemingly contained only mashed potatoes...

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That's interesting. I suspect this is a product of affluence, too... A number of Japanese I know (under 35 or so) think korokke "always" or "usually" have meat in them, although I often find meatless ones in department stores and izakaya without much trouble...

We had a party a week or two ago and I made two of my "usual" korokke, kabocha, and kurogoma, which were a big hit with everyone. I also made some with nozawana pickles chopped finely, which was popular with the Japanese guests and not really noticed by the American and Korean guests.

I was planning to make them with takana pickles, but found that the nozawana pickles I could buy had fewer unnatural ingredients (just sorbitol).

One nice thing about most meatless korokke is that they take much less work to prepare. Usually they just need ricing (mashing), mixing and cooling.

What is the first thing that the cook sauteed? Is it mushroom? They looked very nice when finished?

Onion and minced meat, with salt and pepper. So says the narrator.

When I was small, my mother used to tell me that korokke were meat-less and menchi katsu (or menchi for short) had meat in them.

I must say I can get nostalgic for those korokke that seemingly contained only mashed potatoes...

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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