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Hot Drinks & Winter Warmers


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My favorite hot booze drink in the world is a humble little concoction my mom used to make for me as a folky cold remedy, believe it or not--a thing called a Guggle Muggle. Into a mugful of hot milk, put some honey and vanilla extract, plus some combination of cinnamon/allspice/nutmeg to taste ... and then add a good stiff shot of whiskey (or other brown booze of choice). As a cold remedy, you're supposed to drink this down as quickly as humanly possible without scalding your mouth, then jump into bed under a bunch of quilts to "sweat out the evil humors" or whatever. But it also makes a darn fine toddy when sipped in a more leisurely manner on a chilly night. :smile:

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This may not be what you're looking for but in a recent thread about beer "cocktails" I posted three recipes from a cool little book from the '50's called "Here's How!": the Glasgow Hot Pint, the Pickwickian Dog’s Nose and a recipe given to the author by CBS’ Andy Rooney called the Hot Ale Flip.

I haven't felt the need to try them but they don't sound half-bad.

Kurt

“I like to keep a bottle of stimulant handy in case I see a snake--which I also keep handy.” ~W.C. Fields

The Handy Snake

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The NY Times Magazine recently did an article on "Bar Necessities", including two favorites from Audrey Saunders.

First is her adaptation of the Tom & Jerry from the Jerry Thomas book:

Egg Batter

12 : eggs

3 Tbsp: vanilla extract

2 oz : rum (Bacardi 8 specified)

4 dashes : Angostura bitters

2 lbs: sugar

1 tsp : ground cinnamon

0.75 tsp : ground allspice

0.5 tsp : ground clove

0.5 tsp : ground nutmeg

Separate eggs. Beat sugar, bitters and spices with yolks. Beat whites stiff and fold into yolks.

Service

1 gal : whole milk

1 bottle : rum (Bacardi 8 specified)

1 bottle : cognac (Courvoisier V.S. specified)

Heat the milk until just below the simmer. Each toddy mug gets 2 ounces egg batter and one ounce each rum and cognac. Fill the rest of the way with hot milk, give it a stir and garnish with fresh grated nutmeg.

This is a great drink for a special occasion on a cold night. But, as you can see, it serves a lot of people. This recipe makes around 24 servings. It's probably possible to make a smaller recipe -- perhaps as few as 6 servings -- but that would take some serious precision measuring with the spices (I'd recommend making a spice mix of the regular amounts and then simply dividing the whole works by 1/2 or 1/4 according to how you are scaling the recipe).

Another fun choice for the winter is her Hot Port Sangaree, which has the advantage of much better storage characteristics compared to the T&J. You can make up a bottle of the stuff and drink it off and on for the whole winter.

3 cups : port (Graham's Six Grapes specified)

2 oz : pomegranate molasses (Al Wadi specified)

3 oz : simple syrup (1:1)

2 oz : fresh lemon juice

2 oz : Cointreau

5 dashes : orange bitters (Regans' specified)

5 dashes : Angostura bitters

Lemon twists

Combine all liquids in a bottle. To make a single serving, heat 4 ounces together with a lemon twist to just below the simmer. Strain into a toddy glass and garnish with a new lemon twist.

--

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My favorite hot booze drink in the world is a humble little concoction my mom used to make for me as a folky cold remedy, believe it or not--a thing called a Guggle Muggle. Into a mugful of hot milk, put some honey and vanilla extract, plus some combination of cinnamon/allspice/nutmeg to taste ... and then add a good stiff shot of whiskey (or other brown booze of choice). As a cold remedy, you're supposed to drink this down as quickly as humanly possible without scalding your mouth, then jump into bed under a bunch of quilts to "sweat out the evil humors" or whatever. But it also makes a darn fine toddy when sipped in a more leisurely manner on a chilly night. :smile:

This is my medicine of choice for colds the 'flu or just the blahs. It has no effect whatever on the illness but you no longer give a darn. :biggrin: I think my drug plan should cover it but they think otherwise. :angry:

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Mulled cider with rum or brandy.  As I discovered recently thanks to Jaymes, this is also good with Tuaca...(Hot Apple Pie).

Katie, did you try it? With whipped cream on top? And a sprinkle of nutmeg? :rolleyes:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Mulled cider with rum or brandy.  As I discovered recently thanks to Jaymes, this is also good with Tuaca...(Hot Apple Pie).

Katie, did you try it? With whipped cream on top? And a sprinkle of nutmeg? :rolleyes:

Not yet. I don't have either vanilla liqueur in the house at the moment. Lately I've been indulging in a bottle of Buffalo Trace bourbon and it's various possibilities. Had some Old Fashioneds last night and decided that was a great way to get the non-brown liquor drinkers to give it a try.

I bought some sparkling Martinelli's Apple-Pear cider at the store today that is cooling in the fridge as I type this. I might try make something autumnal and sparkly out of that later. Not necessaily a cold weather drink, but any good drink warms me up somehow. :biggrin:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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This is a great drink for a special occasion on a cold night.  But, as you can see, it serves a lot of people.  This recipe makes around 24 servings.  It's probably possible to make a smaller recipe -- perhaps as few as 6 servings -- but that would take some serious precision measuring with the spices (I'd recommend making a spice mix of the regular amounts and then simply dividing the whole works by 1/2 or 1/4 according to how you are scaling the recipe).

I make Tom & Jerrys for two all the time. Well, all the time in the winter, at least.

For two big mugs:

1 egg, separated

1.5 cups milk, warm

2 T. Sugar

1 shot rum (I use Meyer's)

1 shot brandy (I use a local cheapo brandy that's a bit sweeter than most)

Nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice... whatever you like for the top.

Whisk the egg yolk with 1 T. of sugar until it's pale yellow and frothy. Meanwhile, beat the egg white and remaining tablespoon of sugar until it forms soft peaks. Fold the egg yolk into the whites to make a batter.

Gradually add the brandy and rum to the batter and fold to combine.

Put half the batter into each mug. Fill with warm milk. Top with freshly grated nutmeg or cinnamon or whatever else you like.

This is what I always wanted eggnog to taste like...

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Anyone ever tried this stuff?

http://www.canarino.com/

Keurig just released a K-Cup version for their single serve brewing system of this classic hot lemon drink.

I think you could sort of do a hot limoncello with this, if you spiked it with rum or vodka and hit it with some honey or simple syrup.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Anyone ever tried this stuff?

http://www.canarino.com/

Keurig just released a K-Cup version for their single serve brewing system of this classic hot lemon drink.

I think you could sort of do a hot limoncello with this, if you spiked it with rum or vodka and hit it with some honey or simple syrup.

I haven't tried that, but I make hot lemonade whenever I have a sore throat. A shot of brandy goes in if I'm drinking it in the evening.

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A few I've come up with lately:

Warm Sound- Oolong Tea, Sweetened Condensed Milk, Hendricks Ging

Hot Smokey Plum- Lapsang Souchang Tea (black tea smoked over pine needles), Plum Syrup (asian markets), Dewers White Label

They're pretty fun.

Have you ever tryed infusing the gin with tea ala Audrey Sander's Earl Grey MarTEAni scan down a little ways for the recipe and infusing instructions. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?...WIGI2FAHI81.DTL

Edited by M.X.Hassett (log)
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A few I've come up with lately:

Warm Sound- Oolong Tea, Sweetened Condensed Milk, Hendricks Ging

Hot Smokey Plum- Lapsang Souchang Tea (black tea smoked over pine needles), Plum Syrup (asian markets), Dewers White Label

They're pretty fun.

Have you ever tryed infusing the gin with tea ala Audrey Sander's Earl Grey MarTEAni scan down a little ways for the recipe and infusing instructions. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?...WIGI2FAHI81.DTL

Sounds interesting. We have done a Green Teani using Matcha powder and a citrus-pickled cucumber garnish.

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Back in college I dated two Swedish girls (not at the same time :wub: ), who were very fond of making Glug for holiday parties, especially the feats of St. Lucy and St. Nicolas. Generally this is something made in an big pot, or kettle. Just make sure that you warm it over low heat (for God’s sake don’t let it boil) and that you “cook” it in something non-aluminum (enameled cookware is the best).

1 750 ml bottle port wine (don’t go for the super cheap stuff here)

1 750 ml bottle burgundy (or US pinot noir)

1 750 ml bottle of Swedish Vodka (some prefer light rum or brandy here, but it’s a Swedish drink)

1 cup light brown sugar

1/2 cup confectioners sugar

1 cup dark raisin

1 cup yellow (golden) raisin

8 cinnamon sticks

12 whole seeds

1 whole nutmeg

1 orange

many whole cloves (I never really counted (10-15)?)

Fist full of slivered almonds (optional)

Mix all the booze in a Dutch oven or small stock pot and put it on the stove at low heat. While it warms put the cardamom seeds and the 1 nutmeg in a little “sock” made out of cheesecloth & butcher’s twine. You can put the cinnamon sticks in there if you like (I recommend breaking them in half first if they do go in the sock) but I like to just throw them into the pot. Once its warmed (about 125 F) slowly stir in the sugars. You may add more sugar to taste, but I prefer a less sweetened drink. Once the sugars are all dissolved toss in “sock” into the pot and let it steep like a big tea bag. Toss in the raisins and cinnamon sticks (unless they went in the sock) and the sliced almonds (unless your guests are allergic to nuts). Then take the orange, leaving it whole and unpeeled, and push the all of the cloves into the skin of the orange so that it resembles a punk-rock haircut. Float the clove-spiked orange in the glug and serve warm. Try to ladle a few raisin into each mug, so that they may be eaten, or given to overactive children. :blink:

Alamut was the mountain fortress of Hassan i Sabbah and the later heads of the Assassins. Alamut represents more than just a physical place, more even than a symbolic home of the movement. Alamut was with you in what you did; Alamut was in your heart from the moment of your arrival and introduction to "Heaven" until the moment you died.

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  • 3 years later...

The aptly named "Hot Drinks" (Heiss & Heiss) has a fair variety of steaming tipples, though many of them skew into sweet dessert/digestif territory.

Has anyone tried fat-washing a spice-infused bottle of rum to create a boosted Hot Buttered Rum variant?

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I had suggested, but was ultimately shot down for space and equipment limitations, to serve a classic Philadelphia Fish House Punch topped with a hot spiced cider for the winter months. No doubt this could be managed in the home scenario far more easily...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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This is fun:

Puschglühbowle

Over a low flame, heat 3 bottles light, red wine and 1 750-ml bottle Batavia Arrack van Oosten.

While this is simmering, stir in ½ cup sugar and 1 Seville orange or regular orange and 1 lemon, cut into slices and with seeds removed.

After everything has simmered together for 5 minutes, pour this into a heavy earthenware bowl, set it alight and ladle flaming into small, heat-resistant cups.

There's also the Feuerzangenbowle, which is more or less the same thing, but instead of stirring the sugar and the spirits in, you put the former in loaf-form on a set of tongs over the bow, saturate it with the latter and light it up, ladling more booze onto the fire to taste.

aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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Tokyo Toddy

2 oz. lemon zest-infused barley shochu

4 oz. boiling water

1/2 oz. honey

1 whole dried jasmine flower

In a wineglass, steep the dried jasmine flower in hot water for about 20 seconds, allowing it to begin blooming. Add honey and shochu. Consume while hot.

This works, though I keep thinking it could use a little something extra.

Pip Hanson | Marvel Bar

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  • 3 weeks later...

As the Christmas season is upon us, I always enjoy making traditional Wassail. This is a recipe that i have enjoyed making for a few years now. I use 5 bottles of Sam Smith's Nut Brown Ale to 1 bottle of Sam Smith's Taddy Porter, and a dry sherry such as a Manzanilla:

Wassail:

6 bottles ale

12 small apples

3 whole cloves

3 whole allspice

3 broken cardamom seeds

1 broken 3" cinnamon stick

1 tsp ground ginger

1 tsp ground nutmeg

2 cups sugar

1 fifth dry sherry (1 750 ml bottle)

bake the apples at 350 for 20 minutes, or until tender. Tie the cloves, allspice, cinnamon, and cardamom into a cheesecloth bag, place it with 1 bottle of ale, the ginger and nutmeg, into a kettle and heat gently for 10 minutes. Remove the bag, pour in the rest of the ale, the sugar, and the sherry. Heat for 20 minutes. Pour into a large bowl and float the apples on top. Serve hot. Use a good hand crafted or brown ale

During lunch with the Arab leader Ibn Saud, when he heard that the king’s religion forbade smoking and alcohol, Winston Churchill said: "I must point out that my rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite the smoking of cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after, and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them." Ibn Saud relented and the lunch went on with both alcohol & cigars.

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Smoking Bishop is a hot punch that Dickens mentioned in A christmas Carol and another of his novels. I made this recipe for Smoking Bishop last year, and it was excellent. The recipe comes from Dicken's Great Grandson, Cedric Dickens.

Recipe for "A Smoking Bishop"

Taken from "Drinking With Dickens", published in the US by New Amersterdam Books, NY

'Port was the base for a number of drinks: "we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon, over a Christmas bowl of smoking bishop." Bishop seems to have been a very popular drink, and no wonder. I discovered it many years ago and it quickly became a traditional winter party drink. Not only is its taste exquisite, but equally its medicinal qualities are great. You can feel it doing good. Temperatures go up, from the top of the head (bald heads turn red) right down to the toes.'

Ingredients:

For an American version

5 sweet oranges (the original English recipe calls for 6 Seville Oranges)

1 old fashioned grapefruit

1/4 lb sugar to taste

2 bottles cheap strong red wine

1 bottle ruby port

cloves

How It's Done:

Bake the oranges and grapefruit in the oven until they are pale brown and then put them into a warmed earthenware bowl with five cloves pricked into each. Add the sugar and pour in the wine - not the port. Cover and leave in a warm place for about a day. Squeeze the oranges and grapefruit into the wine and pour it through a sieve. Add the port and heat, but do not boil. Serve in warmed goblets and drink hot.

During lunch with the Arab leader Ibn Saud, when he heard that the king’s religion forbade smoking and alcohol, Winston Churchill said: "I must point out that my rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite the smoking of cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after, and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them." Ibn Saud relented and the lunch went on with both alcohol & cigars.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

We are into winter here but I can't complain about the rain. But we needed something to hold off the chill.

Sort of a take off on a whisky mac:

1 1/2 oz bourbon (because I don't have any scotch)

2 oz Stone's green ginger wine

dash of green chartreuse

1 very thin slice lemon

put in a good hand-thrown ceramic mug and heat in microwave for about 40 sec.

Add 2 1/2 oz boiling water

Maybe a lemon twist on top. Preferably serve in front of a wood fire.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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