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AzRaeL

Favourite Cheese

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An easy question for me, actually, because there are 3 that are clearly on top of the craving heap:

1. Queijo da Serra (from Portugal)

2. Afuega 'l Pitu (from Asturias, Spain)

3. a good Parmesan (it's already a cliche here, I know, but it's so good in/with so many things!)


My restaurant blog: Mahlzeit!

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1. Mont D'or

2. Mont D'or

3. Mont D'or

Good choice, but a bit seasonaly limited?


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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1. What are my most indispensable cheeses (the ones I use the most for cooking)?

a. Parmagiana-Reggiano

b. Gruyere

c. Crottin

What do you cook using Crottin? We usually devour it all by its yummy moldy self, but if you have recipes I'd like to hear them.


Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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Maybe a bit seasonal but what about a whole Vacherin in the tub ,to be eaten with a spoon. :wacko::wub:

Otherwise

1)Montgomery cheddar

2)Cashel Blue

3)Goat

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Good choice, but a bit seasonaly limited?

Yes, you are right. I do eat other cheeses in the "off season". However, it is still my all time favorite. :biggrin:


Life is short, eat dessert first

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1. parm....undisputed king of cheeses

2. epoisse, pont l'eveque, robluchon or some similar washed rind cheese

3. a great cheddar, perhaps from canada or england


Nothing quite like a meal with my beautiful wife.

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1) Gruyère Surchoix (matured)

2) Vacherin Mont d'Or (making a small hole in the middle, pouring white wine into it, seving it slightly warmed and eating it with a spoon. As seen many times in simple retaurants in the Vallée de Joux, where it comes from)

3) Sbrinz, the oldest Swiss Cheese and probably the ancestor of Parmigiano.

Regards.


Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler.

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fougerus, definitely fougerus

any good italian fontina

pont l'eveque

camembert

What can I say, I like them soft and squishy.


I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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Reading this makes me so hungry! There are lots of great cheeses I still haven't tried but hope to change this when we holiday in France next year. So, for now, fave 3 in no particular order

Parmesan: eat so much Italian food, it has to be on here!

Goat's cheese, especially Pant-Ys-Gawn from Wales

Wigmore - my current favourite. English, ewes milk, Brie-like but much creamier (better description here)

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Goat's cheese, especially Pant-Ys-Gawn from Wales

Is anyone else thinking what I'm thinking? :blush:

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:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

I've never even thought of it like that before - you must have a different kind of mind to me Suzanne :wink: Pant means valley I think, god knows what the gawn bit is!

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1. Aged mahon

2. Ubriaco Prosecco

3. Very Old St Maure / Stravecchio Parm / Carles Roquefort

Happy cheese selling story: The day before Thanksgiving a customer came in, gave me her order. I filled it, then she said, "Give me 1/2# of YOUR personal favorite!" Made my day. She went home thrilled with Ubriaco Prosecco.


Lisa K

Lavender Sky

"No one wants black olives, sliced 2 years ago, on a sandwich, you savages!" - Jim Norton, referring to the Subway chain.

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Ditto to what everyone said about the difficulty in limiting it to three.

1. Parmigiano-Reggiano (aged), Comte', Beaufort

2. Gorgonzola, Cabrales, Explorateur

3. Cantal, Ricotta Salata (over Feta any day), Raclette


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Wow - I go offline for a week, and here’s what I come back to… my favorite topic (you can read about it in my site down below).

I’ll have to second whoever said hard, semisoft, and soft!

Kidding aside, my current favorites are epoisses, camembert de normandie and fourme sauternes (forme d’ambert that has been soaked in sauterne.

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3 favorites?

free

free

free

:biggrin:

But seriously, I have been on a mad Manchego kick of late. Been using it for everything - grating on pesto, grilled cheese (paired with Swiss), a kick-up for cheese fondue, and my favorite - straight up with an after dinner glass of Fonseca LBV port.


If someone writes a book about restaurants and nobody reads it, will it produce a 10 page thread?

Joe W

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Aged Gouda

Extra-Aged Crottin de Chavignol

Brillant Savarin (or Explorateur or St. Andre...)

(also tops: fontina d'aosta, gorgonzola. livarot, raclette on potatoes & Leyden w/cumin )

parmagiano goes w/out saying... or pecorino romano... or fresh ricotta...


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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1. Manchego -- I prefer mine soft and creamy (hence young)

2. Parmagiano Reggiano

2.1 Brillat-Savarin

2.2 Bufula Mozzerella

2.3 Comte

2.4 Ami du Chambertin

2.5 aged Crottin

2.6 Delice de Pommard

2.7 Saenkaenter (aged Gouda)

2.8 Manouri (greek goat's milk, great snacking cheese)

2.9 Gorgonzola, Montbriac, and Roquefort (for dessert with honey, as a plate of 3 small slices)

3. Velveeta :wink:

Yes, I do like Cambazola -- we used to be able to get better quality locally, though. Maybe I just need to look around more.

Lee


--- Lee

Seattle

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Simplest are the best when bought from the best cheese shops:

chevre

parmesan

mozzarella

brie

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These change, sometimes weekly, but, FWIW:

Nancy's Old Chatham Camembert

Sotocenere al Tartufo

Aged Gouda

King's Island Roaring Forties Blue

:rolleyes:


Pick up your phone

Think of a vegetable

Lonely at home

Call any vegetable

And the chances are good

That a vegetable will respond to you

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Stilton.

Almost anything cooked with chevre.

All of the great Italian cooking cheeses,

in all of their respective dishes.

BB


Food is all about history and geography.

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Extra Sharp Cheddar

Provolone (good quality..smokey) used instead of Mozzerella quite a bit.

Parmesan

Saga Blue

French Brie...as in *from* France

Good Ol' Land O'Lakes American....every so often

Kraft Deli-Thin Sliced Swiss. For when I am dieting and needs me my cheese!

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My favorite that I know about is Chiberta from Basque. It's

semi-soft and best served in good weather with the windows

open, French bread, and a red Burgundy as big as a house or

bigger.

Of course, good blue and Parmesan are terrific, but my other

two favorites would have to be cheeses I have no notes on and

ate with red Burgundy in various restaurant cheese courses.

Many of the courses were with a Morey St. Denis at Harrald's

in New York State, and one of the courses was with a Corton at

Lutece in Manhattan. Some of the best were harder than

semi-soft and from places in Europe other than France and

Italy.


What would be the right food and wine to go with

R. Strauss's 'Ein Heldenleben'?

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