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Q&A -- A Sampling of North Indian Breads


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Thank you for the welcome!

Between working full-time, going to school full-time, studying, freelance research, parenting, and husbanding, I don't have a whole lot of free time...but I expect you'll be seeing a lot of me in several of the forums (fora?), especially those pertaining to Indian food.

I've just found this site within the last few days, and have only begun to scratch the surface of what's here. As a student at a formal (and well-regarded) culinary program, though, I'm deeply impressed by the quality of information offered here at eGCI.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 5 months later...
I love the taste of khamiri naan. How would you advise me to go about making these?

Thanks

I believe this type of naan is where the dough is raised with yeast.. but nothing is done differently other than that. So in the regular naan recipe.... I would forgo the yogurt and use yeast instead

Welcome to eG. I see that this is your first post here. Do stop by the India forum and tell us about your love for naans :smile:

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Thanks for the welcome, Monica. I think that this site is fantastic and I enjoyed your articles, in particular. I think that khamiri naan are made with wild yeast as opposed to commercial yeast. The ones that I have had always have that sourdough tang. I was wondering whether to just try making them with any starter or if there is some special technique that is traditionally used.

Roohi

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  • 7 months later...

i have questions regarding parantha. is there a difference in the ingredients /preparation between south and north india?

i have seen them made before (in kerala) and i remember the cooks pulling and slapping the dough a lot before rolling it up. ( like you would for some noodle recipes)

i also remember that they did not use any eggs (the recipe here calls for eggs). what do strict veg indians do?

lastly, i also remember that they were very oily. these dont seem oily at all.

thanks very much in advance!

ps i will be trying the other breads here - they look fabulous!

Edited by easternsun (log)

"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

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