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Food Terms We Loathe/Misuse


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Brits don't say sammie, they say sarnie. Rachael Ray says sammie.

After having frequented this site, I don't care if I ever see the word amuse again. I don't even care if it's correct. It's overused and tiresome.

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Rachael Ray says sammie. 

factually speaking, if i may, so do an awful lot of other people.

Guess my life has too many real problems to get all worked up about something like an overly-cute term used by someone that means no offense.

yeah, as long as they pronounce "bruschetta" correctly. and they know exactly what it is. :laugh:

Edited by tommy (log)
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When I use the words that people seem to object to, it is usually just laziness or bad writing skills. I use 'cukes' to avoid spelling out 'cucumbers' (plus, it is easier to type) - I never use it when I am actually talking.

Also - I am not a very good or inventive writer. On my webpage, I try to write a description of every recipe that I put on. So I tend to repeat myself - or use words like: yummy (but never yummo - I do have some standards :raz:), amazing, incredible.

As far as "foodie" goes, I am torn. I never know what word to use. "Gourmet" is goofy. "Foodie" sounds frivolous. "Chowhound" is taken and a bit butch for me :wink:. "Serious about food and cooking" is pretentious and a bit long winded. I usually tell people when it comes up that I am really 'into' food :rolleyes:. I think that I usually sound self depricating and slightly ashamed and I know I shouldn't - I wouldn't sound like that if my hobby was golf or quilting or gardening - so why food? I know people who take European tours to view gardens or architecture, why do I feel foolish because I want to tour to go to restaurants or markets? Oops :unsure:, different topic, I guess. Sorry - I got carried away!

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"EVOO". Can't we just call it olive oil?

i would not want to confuse "olive oil" for extra virgin olive oil. the latter i go through gallons of, the former i've never once bought.

How can that be? I use regular olive oil to cook, since it's cheaper and EVOO has such a low smoke point.

As for the term EVOO, I kind of like it - saves six syllables. And of course it shows off my sophisticated culinary knowledge! ;P

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How can that be? I use regular olive oil to cook, since it's cheaper and EVOO has such a low smoke point.

i cook with EVOO (not at extreme temps) and i don't care about the cost. i also can't be bothered with one more bottle on my small counter. that's how that can be. :wink:

Edited by tommy (log)
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After having frequented this site, I don't care if I ever see the word amuse again.  I don't even care if it's correct.  It's overused and tiresome.

Hmmmm...what would you suggest as a replacement?

Snack? Bite? Taste? Pre-meal degout? Mini-appetizer? Harbinger of things to come?

I'm curious!!! :biggrin:

I tend to use "lovely" too often when talking about food. I should stop doing that, but it's such a nice word. :wink:

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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How can that be? I use regular olive oil to cook, since it's cheaper and EVOO has such a low smoke point.

i don't care about the cost.

Let us all know next time you throw a dinner party (To which we're all invited of course!)!

Since I'm by no stretch affluent, I go for the more versatile POOO (Plain 'Ol Olive Oil).

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Guess my life has too many real problems to get all worked up about something like an overly-cute term used by someone that means no offense.

yeah, as long as they pronounce "bruschetta" correctly. and they know exactly what it is. :laugh:

Damn straight, bucko. I do make an exception for that. :raz:

(Maybe next time I'll ask if they put zu-SHEE-nee on their bru-shetta.)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Cukes just sounds offensive to me. :)

EVOO, since the first time I heard it, just screams 'look how cool I am! I made up an acronym! I'm tooooo cool to just say the words.' ;)

"Give it to Neil. I'll bet he'll eat it."
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The "sammie" thing is mostly used by Brits

It is? Sarnie, perhaps.

Oops! In that case, I hate sammie! Heh. Not really.

"I like 'em french fried pertaters." (Billy Bob Thornton as Karl, in Sling Blade.)
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so THAAAAAAAAT'SSS what <<EVOO>> means!! :shock: when i "googled it" (yet ANOTHER term I hate and have started saying....) the other day, the only thing i came up with was a bottle of Rachael Ray (gak) olive oil product -- the window of which i quickly closed. couldn't figure out why everyone was using her olive oil! :laugh: ok, that was just dumbness on my part.

moving on....

a DESPISED & HATED word of mine is ---> SPUD/s (cringing as i type it)

i also can't stand hearing Jamie Oliver say "vej".

in short all those diminutives of food words make me wanna block my ears and aggravate me. i find them ok to use for, say, shorthand notes in a recipe to save time but to actually use them for speech??

as an aside, i wonder if the use of all these cutesy words have anything to do with one's personality (type)?

Edited by ohev'ochel (log)
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as an aside, i wonder if the use of all these cutesy words have anything to do with one's personality (type)?

Maybe. I've also noticed that it's a bit cultural - Aussies, for instance, tend to abbreviate things that I never would have thought to shorten - afternoon becomes "arvo," breakfast becomes "breckie," and so on.

I think some of it is personality, no doubt - but there's definitely a culturual element.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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as an aside, i wonder if the use of all these cutesy words have anything to do with one's personality (type)?

Maybe. I've also noticed that it's a bit cultural - Aussies, for instance, tend to abbreviate things that I never would have thought to shorten - afternoon becomes "arvo," breakfast becomes "breckie," and so on.

I think some of it is personality, no doubt - but there's definitely a culturual element.

good point, megan -- didn't think of that cultural aspect when i was writing my comment :wink: i'm sure ur right.

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