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Roasted Cauliflower


sammy
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Wow. I'm just a rube from Manhattan, and I have never seen a purple cauliflower before. kitwilliams, that photo is absolutely beautiful. Do they taste the same as regular cauliflower? Do they cook the same, behave the same? Has anyone ever found them in the NY area? (Maybe I'm just not looking hard enough?)

Ciao Cakewalk! I just bought some 'fetal' purple and green cauliflowers at Chelsea Market. 15th St and 9th Ave. Meaning they were little bitty baby cauliflowers.

Have fun!!

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Could one use bacon fat or a butter/EVOO blend for roasting?

After peering curiously at this thread for the last 6 months, I'm giving it a go today. Have the over preheating as I type.

I like that Arizona provides 90% of the US's winter vegetables (lettuce, broccoli, and cauliflower!) - easy to find cheap, fresh stuff.

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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Well, I was too impatient to wait for a reply, so I went ahead with a butter and garlic-infused EVOO combo, s&p, cauliflower & sliced red onion. Delicious.

I might have roasted a bit too long for the little crunchies/gibbles, they're pretty dark brown, but the larger slices are just right and totally enjoyable.

Am eating with spinach fettuccine for some color, along with a little grated reggiano. I think I'll be finishing the whole head of cauliflower tonight. I've never done that before in my life, but it does cook down quite a bit! :wink::blush:

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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Well, I was too impatient to wait for a reply, so I went ahead with a butter and garlic-infused EVOO combo, s&p, cauliflower & sliced red onion.  Delicious.

I might have roasted a bit too long for the little crunchies/gibbles, they're pretty dark brown, but the larger slices are just right and totally enjoyable.

Am eating with spinach fettuccine for some color, along with a little grated reggiano.  I think I'll be finishing the whole head of cauliflower tonight.  I've never done that before in my life, but it does cook down quite a bit!  :wink:  :blush:

Personally, I think the bacon fat idea -- which I plan on trying asap -- is sheer genius, but don't tell my cardiologist! :wink::biggrin:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

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Bacon fat will definitely be my next experiment. I can't believe I just ate a whole head of cauliflower. Urf.

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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can someone please post pics of their finished cauliflower?  :wub: I always wonder if I'm doing it right...it good though. addicted.

The only picture I have is from the last time I made it, and out of all the times I've made it, this was the batch I least liked. But, I'll post it anyway. I like it more browned and crispy than this, but still it didn't taste bad!

gallery_13038_837_112041.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Here's a shot of some I made tonight. Good thing I made it, because my naked fried chicken experiment was a bust.

gallery_18691_840_177738.jpg

Edit: Oops, Susan, I don't know how I missed that you'd posted a pic. I read the new posts on page nine but didn't notice that there was a page 10.

Your shot is much nicer than mine.

Edited by patti (log)

Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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Instead of slicing the whole head, I break my cauliflower into large florets and slice in half (or quarter) and try to make them similar in size and ensure that all pieces have at least one cut edge. As does patti (and countless others), I cook it for at least 45 minutes at 425F.

I have created four new Cauliholics this week. :cool:

The purple I had last night was just as stunningly fabulous as was the yellow two nights before!

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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. . . . .

The purple I had last night was just as stunningly fabulous as was the yellow two nights before!

Did the purple stay purple and the yellow stay yellow? If it does, you could add in some of the green and have Mardi Gras cauliflower. :laugh:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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. . . . .

The purple I had last night was just as stunningly fabulous as was the yellow two nights before!

Did the purple stay purple and the yellow stay yellow? If it does, you could add in some of the green and have Mardi Gras cauliflower. :laugh:

The purple DOES stay purple (although it gets dark and is difficult to tell if you've got it brown and crispy enough -- you have to test it to see :wink: ) and the yellow stays a lovely, buttery yellow. The farmer called it "cheddar cheese cauliflower", however I think it looked more buttery than cheddar cheese-y. Come on, now -- the cheddar cheese in my house is white!

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm a new convert. I've read this thread at first with idle curiosity and then I thought, it must be good. It's even better than I thought it would be. I just did the regular salt and pepper, EVOO roasting of about 40 minutes @400, and I may never buy another potato. Now when I shop I'm going to look for larger and larger heads. Thanks for this great idea. People said "I can't believe I ate a whole head..." I'm sure could eat two. :wub:

Question: how are the results without oil?

Emma Peel

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...Now when I shop I'm going to look for larger and larger heads.  Thanks for this great idea. People said "I can't believe I ate a whole head..."  I'm sure could eat two.  :wub:

Just be careful when roasting two heads. If you crowd the pans too much it'll just sit there and steam and that's no fun.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Roast cauliflower is one of the joys that EGullet brought me and I love it! Now I want to make it for my birthday party. Can't wait to convert some more people. Problem is there will be about 20-25 guests and I'm not going to roast 12 cauliflowers. (No I'm not. Really not. Or should I??)

Any ideas for dishes that would eke it out? I think someone mentioned a pasta dish upthread. I would prefer something cold though because I'm doing a large buffet for all these people and don't want do do many last minute prep. :smile:

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Any ideas for dishes that would eke it out? I think someone mentioned a pasta dish upthread. I would prefer something cold though because I'm doing a large buffet for all these people and don't want do do many last minute prep.  :smile:

Bowtie pasta, roasted cauliflower, buttered & toasted bread crumbs, EVOO, S&P. Simple and serving at room temperature is fine. Looks very bland on the plates, since everything is beige/brown. If you can find a tri-color or just another color of farfalle, that would be make it more visually interesting. Or, just serve the beige combo on a bright red platter.

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After reading this thread, I ventured out to my local farmer's market and got a head of cauliflower. As a lifelonger cauliflower hater, I was skeptical but to my surprise, I actually enjoyed the flavor of roasted cauliflower. My folks will be visiting this week and I plan to make this for them. Thanks for making me see cauliflower in a new light! :biggrin:

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Asparagus roasted is also very good, so good that the children eat it without

the usual obnoxious comments. 

Thought I would bump this back up since I'm finding some good asparagus prices in the grocery stores.

This is another veggie that changes quite a bit when roasted. It's even easier than roasting cauliflower. I put the cleaned (and "snapped"...as in snapping off the woody bottom part) stalks on the foil-lined pan (I use a dark pan), season them and then simply drizzle olive oil on them. I roll the stalks around a bit on the pan so they get a light coating of oil and spices and that's it (make sure you don't use too much oil). Then roast away.

The first time I made this I roasted it for 20 minutes at 400° and while it was tasty, it was rather limp. So I think a shorter roasting time, perhaps 15 minutes, will work better.

It tastes quite a bit different (in a very good way) than steamed asparagus.

Anyone else try it?

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Asparagus roasted is also very good, so good that the children eat it without

the usual obnoxious comments. 

Thought I would bump this back up since I'm finding some good asparagus prices in the grocery stores.

This is another veggie that changes quite a bit when roasted. It's even easier than roasting cauliflower. I put the cleaned (and "snapped"...as in snapping off the woody bottom part) stalks on the foil-lined pan (I use a dark pan), season them and then simply drizzle olive oil on them. I roll the stalks around a bit on the pan so they get a light coating of oil and spices and that's it (make sure you don't use too much oil). Then roast away.

The first time I made this I roasted it for 20 minutes at 400° and while it was tasty, it was rather limp. So I think a shorter roasting time, perhaps 15 minutes, will work better.

It tastes quite a bit different (in a very good way) than steamed asparagus.

Anyone else try it?

All the time. I prefer thin stalks for roasting. I do it basically the way you described, with just olive oil and kosher salt in a Pyrex or Le Creuset baking dish. About 20-25 min gets the tips nice and crunchy. I often add a bit of truffle oil before serving.

BTW, last month I made a wonderful cream of roasted cauliflower soup. It took more than a modicum of self-control, though, to not eat up half the cauliflower before tossing it in the soup pot.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I apologize if this has been mentioned before, but I'm not reading the 13 pages over again. Now that it is warm I prefer to roast my vegetables outdoors on a sheet pan on the grill. I can usually maintain a temperature between 400 and 425 F with the lid closed on my propane grill. I often lift the pan up on a makeshift rack of cans so I can grill meat under it for the last 20 minutes or so. Of course I also like to grill lots of vegetables like asparagus and baby bok choi right on the grill, but that would be a different topic.

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(I use a dark pan), season them and then simply drizzle olive oil on them.  I roll the stalks around a bit on the pan so they get a light coating of oil and spices and that's it (make sure you don't use too much oil).  Then roast away.

Would a little Meyer lemon olive oil be a good idea here or would 400° be to much for it?

Pat w.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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The cauliflower sounds wonderful, my husband is usually so-so on that veggie but if it tastes more like potatoe....

As for the roasted asparagus, this is one of my favorites. I use the toaster oven at 425 drizzle OO, sprinkle S&P and add chopped garlic sometimes. Sometimes I'll finish with a nice kosher or sea salt also. Recently finished with Orange OO...very nice.

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(I use a dark pan), season them and then simply drizzle olive oil on them.  I roll the stalks around a bit on the pan so they get a light coating of oil and spices and that's it (make sure you don't use too much oil).  Then roast away.

Would a little Meyer lemon olive oil be a good idea here or would 400° be to much for it?

Pat w.

Too much, I think. It'll probably work better as a finishing oil (vis. my post above re truffle oil). Good idea, though.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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