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Roasted Cauliflower


sammy
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In retrospect, I would have turned them over less.  I'm not sure I needed to flip everything every ten or fifteen minutes... but the end result was scrumptious. 

How many times are you flipping them? The original recipe calls for only one flip at the halfway point. Overall, I agree with you because turning the pieces more often than that would be overkill as well as a PITA. I think that's part of the charm of the recipe/method in that it is relatively hands-off once it's roasting.

Here's a pic of my roasted cauliflower with roasted fennel seeds and crushed red pepper (not roasted) and never flipped:

Thank you so much for posting your picture! I can see right away my pieces get a little more "fried"-looking compared to yours when I do the 20 minute version. I am sorry I don't have a camera to post a picture of mine. Hmmm...maybe I can borrow one, which would then make a great post for the "You know you're a foodie when..." discussion. :laugh:

Great, now I am hungry for RC! The red pepper flakes are an inspiration, too.

Yes, you can do the same with brussel sprouts. Not quite the same life-changing experience, but VERY good, nonetheless.

edited to add, I agree. Where cauliflower is completely transformed when roasted, the same magic didn't happen why I tried roasting brussel sprouts. Perhaps I haven't found that perfect recipe yet. I did see an interesting recipe on FoodTV that called for pan frying bacon and walnuts, tossing in the brussel sprouts and then oven-roasting til done. Think I'll give that a try next.

Edited by Toliver (log)

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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In retrospect, I would have turned them over less.  I'm not sure I needed to flip everything every ten or fifteen minutes... but the end result was scrumptious. 

How many times are you flipping them? The original recipe calls for only one flip at the halfway point. Overall, I agree with you because turning the pieces more often than that would be overkill as well as a PITA. I think that's part of the charm of the recipe/method in that it is relatively hands-off once it's roasting

I flipped every 15 minutes because I wasn't certain how long they would cook. There has been quite a range of times noted. Next time, I'll turn them after 30 minutes & then let them go until delightfully brown & crunchy in the crumblies.

Edited by Pat W (log)

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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i'm going to make this again tonight (i'm having someone over for dinner). we'll see how it varies.

i wonder if the cooking time is influenced much by the amount of olive oil? i think i used more than a 1/4 cup.... i'll be sure to use a 1/4 cup tonight. i'l see if i can post a pic.

also to add...i, too, was intrigued by the comparison to french fries. that and the volume of pages propelled me to try this. i'm heartily glad i did, for though i had no aversion to cauliflower, it had no strong appeal either.

cheers :)

hc

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i wonder if the cooking time is influenced much by the amount of olive oil?  i think i used more than a 1/4 cup.... i'll be sure to use a 1/4 cup tonight.  i'l see if i can post a pic.

There are a lot of variables that will impact how the finished product will turn out. I used too much oil once and the end product wasn't very good. Use too much oil and you can forget about crispy anything.

I added too much salt once and that was a kill-joy, as well. It's better to under-season than to over-season.

As previously mentioned (probably pages ago), the type of pan you use to roast the cauliflower will also determine whether you get really browned pieces or just golden pieces. Dark brown pans will give you a more brown, crispier end product. Light colored pans will give you a more overall golden product.

I've had both the golden version and the browned version and I think I really prefer the browned version more.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Slice it no more than a 1/4 inch thick. Some folks slice the whole head. I slice the florets and stalk separately. You will get slices and "gibbles" (crumbs) and I like those best. Roasted florets are very good but not the same thing at all. There seems to be a flavor shift as water is driven off and browning takes place.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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. . . There seems to be a flavor shift as water is driven off and browning takes place.

Exactly. There is a point where it just changes.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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I slice the florets and stalk separately. You will get slices and "gibbles" (crumbs) and I like those best.

Thanks for that tip. I'm making it a point to slice it that way next time. Cauliflower just moved up to the top of my shopping list.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Slice it no more than a 1/4 inch thick. Some folks slice the whole head. I slice the florets and stalk separately. You will get slices and "gibbles" (crumbs) and I like those best. Roasted florets are very good but not the same thing at all. There seems to be a flavor shift as water is driven off and browning takes place.

I have sliced it both ways. The thinner, crispier bits are definitely the tastiest. For some reason, I can't avoid getting some fluffy pieces at the tip of the florets. I'll work on that for the next time.

Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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We had a gorgeous head of purple cauliflower from the organic cauliflower/potato man at the Long Beach (California) Marina Farmers Market on Sunday. Sliced it up just now. Did the olive oil and s&p bit, and ended up cooking it for 40 minutes! It is so good. The little crispies, the oil, the salt and pepper. And, oddly enough, this one has reduced much more than either the Romanesque or the white cauliflower --- anyone know if purple cauliflower has a higher water content than others?

I'm going back to the kitchen for more... :rolleyes:

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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I slice the florets and stalk separately. You will get slices and "gibbles" (crumbs) and I like those best.

Thanks for that tip. I'm making it a point to slice it that way next time. Cauliflower just moved up to the top of my shopping list.

Had it tonight, and did it this way... very good, but not the best roasted cauliflower I've made. My mistake was hurrying it along a bit, because the rest of dinner was done. I used two pans, so it would be single layers and gave it about 35 minutes at 400 degrees. It would have been perfect at about 40 or 45 minutes, I think. The jury is still out for us to flip or not to flip. Tonight I did not flip.

What say you? :smile:

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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The jury is still out for us to flip or not to flip.  Tonight I did not flip.  What say you?  :smile:

I say flip. Because I use a convection oven with the fan on, I find that flipping every 5-8 minutes or so results in more even browining... and more charred "gibbles" (which are, indeed, the best bits).

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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I rarely flip. I just put it in the oven on 400 and go about my business. I usually let it cook for at least 45 minutes, sometimes close to an hour if it's a batch of cauliflower, red onion and brussel sprouts (my favorite combo).

The only time I do mix it up or flip it is when I'm not quite ready to eat and I want to keep it in the oven a little longer.

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I've long refrained from looking at this topic, and was baffled about why it would attract so many posts. Well, now I've looked and, guess what: this weekend, we will eat roasted cauliflower.

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I've long refrained from looking at this topic, and was baffled about why it would attract so many posts. Well, now I've looked and, guess what: this weekend, we will eat roasted cauliflower.

Please do report back.

(Hey folks . . . We may have snagged another one. BWAHAHAHAHAHA!)

The most I have flipped is once. I think that with my pans and non-stick foil it isn't necessary. I have certainly forgotten to flip and it was fine.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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If I don't flip as regularly as I noted above, then the florets and gibbles in the centre of my pan turn out lovely and brown; however, anything on the perimeter of the pan burns beyond eatability. I'd love to not have to flip, but it's all for a good cause!

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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If I don't flip as regularly as I noted above, then the florets and gibbles in the centre of my pan turn out lovely and brown; however, anything on the perimeter of the pan burns beyond eatability.  I'd love to not have to flip, but it's all for a good cause!

I had that problem until I started lining the pan with the non-stick foil. I think the non-stick doesn't allow the stuff to, well, stick, so that it browns on the bottom side about the same. I also think the sheet of foil gives just a bit of insulation that evens things out. Then again, all oven/pan/temperature combinations will probably differ.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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If I don't flip as regularly as I noted above, then the florets and gibbles in the centre of my pan turn out lovely and brown; however, anything on the perimeter of the pan burns beyond eatability.  I'd love to not have to flip, but it's all for a good cause!

I had that problem until I started lining the pan with the non-stick foil. I think the non-stick doesn't allow the stuff to, well, stick, so that it browns on the bottom side about the same. I also think the sheet of foil gives just a bit of insulation that evens things out. Then again, all oven/pan/temperature combinations will probably differ.

Sticking has never been a problem with the pans I use. I've also tried the non-stick foil method but found that it was one extra step to achieve exactly the same result and I ended up having to flip it anyway. Really, I chalk it up to the oven itself as it is rather idiosyncratic with its hotter and cooler spots. Drives me nuts with a sheet of cookies.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Ah well . . . It is the oven. I think your cookie experience confirms that. Nothing to be done but flip and flip.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Below is the original recipe. I know I cook it MUCH longer than the recipe states, and I never flip it. There are almost as many variations as there are posts in this thread.

Jim Dixon has the recipe on his website Real Good Food and is generally given credit for bringing this to egullet..

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I cook it hotter (usually at about 450 F) and also longer (about 45 minutes) than the recipe specifies. I also typically use two separate cookie sheets for the sliced floret/stalk pieces which have the crumbly bits mixed in. I start flipping about 15 minutes into the process and at about thrity minute I try to separate the crumbly now well browned bits and the very thin slices from the thicker less cooked ones.

This gives me one cookie sheet of totally golden brown and crunchy bits/slices at the 30 - 35 minute mark and the second sheet comes out of the oven about 15 - 20 minutes later.

There is indeed a point at which it just changes and the magical flavor/texture transformation takes place. But I don't care for truly burned pieces that get carbon black - there is in fact a point at which it is overcooked.

Separating the bigger and small bits has helped me get more uniform results.

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Here's tonight's cauliflower for roasting, purchased from Neil at the Sunday Long Beach Marina Farmer's Market:

gallery_2109_934_131756.jpg

There will be five at dinner...and I don't think it will be enough cauliflower (they are very large heads)...

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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Wow. I'm just a rube from Manhattan, and I have never seen a purple cauliflower before. kitwilliams, that photo is absolutely beautiful. Do they taste the same as regular cauliflower? Do they cook the same, behave the same? Has anyone ever found them in the NY area? (Maybe I'm just not looking hard enough?)

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cakewalk: the purple and yellow (and the romanesco too) all taste like your typical white cauliflower....mayhaps a tad milder?...no, I just went and had a taste (ended up only cooking the yellow last night. need to have some for tonight as well!!!)

I think we are going to need a new thread: R.C.A. Roasted Cauliflower Anonymous!

"Hi. My name is Kit and I'm a Cauli-holic."

Here's another gorgeous pic: must give credit to my friend, Jon Nickson:

gallery_2109_934_92730.jpg

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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