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Venison


snowangel
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That chili looks fabulous. Your new camera is doing you proud.

Have you tried venison stroganoff yet?

We did kebabs the other night, over a pilaf, and were not disappointed.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Looks good, Susan. How big was your venison roast? We get the odd deer, but usually grind everything for sausage except the tenderloins and loins, which we cut into scallops. I'm learning to like venison better and better, so next year I'd like to keep more of it in "chunks" for different recipes. I'd appreciate your advice about the cuts you find most useful.

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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Looks good, Susan.  How big was your venison roast?  We get the odd deer, but usually grind everything for sausage except the tenderloins and loins, which we cut into scallops.  I'm learning to like venison better and better, so next year I'd like to keep more of it in "chunks" for different recipes.  I'd appreciate your advice about the cuts you find most useful.

This is embarrassing.

Of the two venison that were gifted to me, one was done by a professional butcher, so I really haven't a clue what and how they cut it up, but I sure wish I'd been more specific in how they packaged the stuff!

The other venision was delivered as four quarters -- two shoulder and two leg quarters. Skinned. My FIL kept the backstraps (but I did get the backstraps from the other deer).

Now we get to the embarrassing part. These skinned quarters came to me not long before Thanksgiving, when I was getting ready for not only Thanksgiving, but prepping for a women's weekend (which started Thanksgiving Day afternoon), as well as filling the larder for the family while I was gone.

It never even occurred to me to have my dad (a former butcher) help me.

So, I just basically cut the thing up as seemed logical, knowing what little I do. Hell, I didn't even both grabbing the copy of Cutting Up in the Kitchen to guide me.

So, I'm sure what I have isn't really standard, but it was the way the bones and things laid.

When I packaged the stuff up, I aimed for a variety of packages, ranging in weight from 1.5 to about 5 pounds. Some is clearly meant to be steaks, the other stuff is up for grabs.

My two regrets:

Not checking out the book called "Making the Most of Your Deer" and doing some reading before I tackled this.

Not taking pictures of what's in each package and labeling photos and packages accordingly, since I used butcher paper, not clear plastic to wrap.

And (oh, make that three regrets). Choosing a time to do it when I was unbelievably rushed.

I chose this method for the second deer (I could have had it processed) because I was bound and determined to do it myself. ANd, I'm not particularly fond of venison sausage. It seems to dry, and none of the stuff I've had that's been processed locally really turns my crank, although I did get a nice summer sausage from the deer I had processed.

So, now I've come clean about my hacking!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Don't apologize -- hacking can be good. I don't care much for venison sausage either -- there's no fat on them thar bones, is there? My dh has totally gotten into making it, though, and the rest of the fam really enjoys.

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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Don't apologize -- hacking can be good.  I don't care much for venison sausage either -- there's no fat on them thar bones, is there?  My dh has totally gotten into making it, though, and the rest of the fam really enjoys.

Lori, implore them to hold back some hunks for braising and for chili. The combo of the small dice and the ground makes for a fabulous chili.

I've got more venison steaks than I know what to do with (from the pro butchered one), and I'm thinkint stir fry.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I'm behind on my venison posting. Earlier this month, when I was blogging, I made venison several ways:

First off, chops and tenderloin.

gallery_6263_35_5570.jpg

I think I did a mighty fine job on the tenderloin.

gallery_6263_35_7393.jpg

The biggest success was with the leftover tenderloin.

gallery_6263_35_4234.jpg

Some horseradish met it's match with some cream cheese (whipped), capers and leftover tenderloin. This was absolutely divine, and were I to be faced with more backstraps, I probably wouldn't bother serving them fresh from the oven, but this way was beyond belief. There was also chili, and I think one other dish which I'm not recalling.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I've got more venison steaks than I know what to do with (from the pro butchered one), and I'm thinkint stir fry.

Venison Pasty?

You might combine the venison with pork, or at least add some pork fat, but I think the flavor would go well with pasty's root vegtables.

SB (and a real lard crust) :raz:

PS: You could make little dough antlers for decoration! :wacko:

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You might combine the venison with pork, or at least add some pork fat, but I think the flavor would go well with pasty's root vegtables.

SB (and a real lard crust) :raz:

PS: You could make little dough antlers for decoration! :wacko:

I hate root vegetables. Hate them. I can be coerced into eating roasted or raw carrots, but that's it.

But, the idea of pasties with venison, potatoes, and perhaps a few diced water chestnuts does have potential!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Don't apologize -- hacking can be good.  I don't care much for venison sausage either -- there's no fat on them thar bones, is there?  My dh has totally gotten into making it, though, and the rest of the fam really enjoys.

Lori, implore them to hold back some hunks for braising and for chili. The combo of the small dice and the ground makes for a fabulous chili.

I've got more venison steaks than I know what to do with (from the pro butchered one), and I'm thinkint stir fry.

Gaah! Not that I'm against stir fry. Go for it. But please, I implore you, try barbecuing some of those steaks - either as steaks, or as kebabs. Use my mother's marinade recipe, here on RecipeGullet. Grill them. Hardy Upper Midwesterner that you are, you won't have a problem with the cold. But if you think you will, broil them instead.

You won't regret it.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Nancy, but of course, I have grilled and smoked venison! I actually smoked a piece during the blog, but smoked it for too long. Smoked venison should be smoked for a big, and then foiled with some juice because this young lass of a deer was oh, so lean. Trust me, I've run through many bags of Kingsford this winter!

Thanks for the link to the marinade. I've got a hunk that's begging to be kebobed (is that a verb?).

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Yes, I've admired your smokery. (Is that a noun?) Marinading and kebabing (a gerund?) will not produce the same results, and will be much quicker. I'd like to try the venison smoking, for my own comparison, but I think you'll find the results are different. Do let me know for sure. Put the kebabs over pilaf. Use the spare marinade as part of the pilaf cooking juice. Mm. :wub:

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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You might combine the venison with pork, or at least add some pork fat, but I think the flavor would go well with pasty's root vegtables.

SB (and a real lard crust) :raz:

PS: You could make little dough antlers for decoration! :wacko:

I hate root vegetables. Hate them. I can be coerced into eating roasted or raw carrots, but that's it.

But, the idea of pasties with venison, potatoes, and perhaps a few diced water chestnuts does have potential!

So you would probably choose "without", (rutabega)? :sad:

Potatoes are a good base, and carrots add a sweetness, but you need another flavor. How about turnips? Their mild earthiness might be good with the venison? :hmmm:

SB (will consult his brother; hunter and game eater par excellence) :wink:

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You might combine the venison with pork, or at least add some pork fat, but I think the flavor would go well with pasty's root vegtables.

SB (and a real lard crust) :raz:

PS: You could make little dough antlers for decoration! :wacko:

I hate root vegetables. Hate them. I can be coerced into eating roasted or raw carrots, but that's it.

But, the idea of pasties with venison, potatoes, and perhaps a few diced water chestnuts does have potential!

So you would probably choose "without", (rutabega)? :sad:

Yes, Steve, consult your brother. I simply can't to rutebagas, turnips or parsnips. But, that rhubarb and venison...

I quite frankly, and probably irreverently, think that some crunch from water chestnuts might be a nice twist.

Potatoes are a good base, and carrots add a sweetness, but you need another flavor. How about turnips? Their mild earthiness might be good with the venison? :hmmm:

SB (will consult his brother; hunter and game eater par excellence) :wink:

Yes, consult your brother. Something without root crops. Potatoes, perhaps?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I've got more venison steaks than I know what to do with (from the pro butchered one), and I'm thinkint stir fry.

Venison Pasty?

You might combine the venison with pork, or at least add some pork fat, but I think the flavor would go well with pasty's root vegtables.

SB (and a real lard crust) :raz:

PS: You could make little dough antlers for decoration! :wacko:

I had some chunks of venison which made a great pie the other day - I thought of doing pasties first, but went with the pie option cos it was quicker, but the principle is the same. And root vegetables definitely work well - I threw in chunks of swede and the combination of flavours and textures were great. I used crushed juniper and thyme, along with a splash or three of red wine, a spoonful of mustard and lots of freshly ground pepper to help the gravy along, and a good chunk of butter to make up for the lack of fat. Served with some quick-steamed cabbage with apple and nutmeg. Yum! It was really good!

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

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I had some chunks of venison which made a great pie the other day - I thought of doing pasties first, but went with the pie option cos it was quicker, but the principle is the same. And root vegetables definitely work well - I threw in chunks of swede and the combination of flavours and textures were great. I used crushed juniper and thyme, along with a splash or three of red wine, a spoonful of mustard and lots of freshly ground pepper to help the gravy along, and a good chunk of butter to make up for the lack of fat.  Served with some quick-steamed cabbage with apple and nutmeg. Yum! It was really good!

I'm not a real big venison eater, but that sounds like damn fine fare to me! :raz:

SB (but, what do we call "swede" here in the Colonies?) :unsure:

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I had some chunks of venison which made a great pie the other day - I thought of doing pasties first, but went with the pie option cos it was quicker, but the principle is the same. And root vegetables definitely work well - I threw in chunks of swede and the combination of flavours and textures were great. I used crushed juniper and thyme, along with a splash or three of red wine, a spoonful of mustard and lots of freshly ground pepper to help the gravy along, and a good chunk of butter to make up for the lack of fat.  Served with some quick-steamed cabbage with apple and nutmeg. Yum! It was really good!

I'm not a real big venison eater, but that sounds like damn fine fare to me! :raz:

SB (but, what do we call "swede" here in the Colonies?) :unsure:

Ha ha, we all think we speak the same lingo - I searched about and it turns out that what I (in the UK) call 'swede' is what you guys call rutabaga. And I'd always vaguely wondered what rutabaga is. Now I know. Goes very well with venison though, whatever you call it :wink:

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

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  • 2 weeks later...
Venison stroganoff -- is this cooked quickly or long and slow?  I love stroganoff-like things -- tell me more.

Lori, I loosely followed this recipe. Knowing that venison doesn't have a lot of fat, and this piece seemed like it might be tough, I sliced it very thinly. The venison excuded quite a bit of fat and liquid (I suppose you could say I didn't brown it, but steamed it because the pan was quite crowded), I did lower the heat dramatically and put a lid on before I removed the venison and continued with the recipe.

The venison emerged tender and succulent, without being overcooked.

The only other mod I made to this recipe was to add some worchestershire sauce.

Oh, and I didn't use as much meat as the recipe called for -- I think I used a pound and a half instead, but when I make stroganoff, I want it extra saucy because Heidi can't/won't eat the meat.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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cool, susan

we are going away for the weekend so i pulled a small venison roast from the freezer to provide dinner tonight and leftovers for me tomorrow's dinner for me.

i'm going to sear it then roast lightly in the oven then serve with some

<sorry i was just admiring a male cardinal who was haning out in the evergreen outside my window>

noodles, broccoli and red cabbage and a mushroom sauce.

<oohhhhh the fox is back in our neighbor's yard>

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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