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English Wine, what are the views?


Pablo
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As far as I know, England is best at sparkling wines.

But who knows what is coming next.

Check this:

http://www.dailyreviewonline.com/Stories/0...1735444,00.html

Edited by Andre (log)

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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I have recently tasted some wine from England and found it to be surprisingly good. Does anyone else share this view?

I seem to remember that there is a distinction between English wine and British wine. One involves grapes grown on the island and one involves grapes grown on the continent and vinified in England.

Mark

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British wine (fast disappearing I'm relieved to say) is bulk product finished in the UK, fortified and once sold as "British Sherry". To be avoided at all costs.

English wine is grown and vinified here. Long under-rated, some vineyards have been producing reasonable wine for years. Although it's never going to be of stellar quality it is now well made and even the reds can be acceptable, the whites are often worth seeking out, mostly of Germanic style but not always. The sparkling wine ("Champagne"), especially that produced by Nyetimber in Sussex is excellent and often wins in competition against established "real champagne" makers.

Edited by britcook (log)
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In this week's New Statesman, Roger Scruton said that it was illegal, according to EU law, to label wine as 'English' - since (unlike the UK or an authorised wine region outside the UK, 'England' is not recognised as a place by the relevant authorities). He didn't source this claim, though, which makes me suspect that it's a Eurosceptic myth (along the lines of 'curved bananas are illegal', etc).

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Mr Scruton is obviously not to be trusted (something I have long suspected). For complete information there are four distinct categories of still English Wine

>English Vineyards Quality Wine Produced in a Specified Region (psr)

Wine made from grapes grown in England from one or more of the approved varieties that has been entered for and passed the Quality Wine Scheme. Not all approved varieties are permitted to be used for Quality Wines

>English Counties Regional Wine

Wine made from grapes grown in England from one or more of the approved varieties that has been entered for and passed the Regional Wine Scheme. This wine is still a Table Wine (equivalent to a French ‘Vin de Pays’) but does not need to bear the name ‘Table Wine’

>English Table Wine

Wine made from grapes grown in England from one or more of the approved varieties that is not a Regional Wine or a Quality Wine

>UK Table Wine

Wine made from UK grown grapes where the grape variety used is not an approved one.

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A shout for Bob Lindo at Camel Valley Vineyard, just up the road from us. His Pinot Noir Brut Rosé 2001 is really powerful, and easy on the dosage. An excellent wine - for Champagne money, however.

See his site HERE

I was picking grapes there last month, and it was freezing. Still, payment in this year's vintage!

slacker,

Padstow, Cornwall

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once came across a white made by a relative that I took to Bordeaux with me to show them what the Brits could do. Remember that the owner of Domaine de Chevalier was lucky to taste this 1987 (in about 1993) and he refused to believe that it came from England as he thought that it was far too good.

Can't remember the cepages involved but I know that the vines have been grubbed up which is a shame. I had one of the bottles last year and at the ripe old age of 15 it was still surprisingly good.

The most highly decorated wine is Nyetimber and as Britcook says wins many awards. I seem to remember that it one best sparkling wine in the world or some such other Decanter run tasting. (Funny thing is that it is run by an American).

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