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Florence Restaurants: Reviews & Recommendations

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Had the worst gelato ever at carabe. I mean, ever in my entire life. I got three flavors, zuppa ingles (because that was the flavor I first had when I fist had gelato) cafe (as recommended) and tiramisu. The last was the smallest and best. the other two were like sad ice milks that had been refrozen-- full of big crystals. I threw out the bowl, to be honest. I find it so weird, since carabe has gotten such strong recommendations.

I agree. I thought Carabe sucked.

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ate at o!o again, more because of proximity to my apartment and the fact they are open on Sunday night. they always bring you a terrific tapas with your drink, which makes it a pleasant place to be before 7:30 (the beginning of the dining hour). Unfortunately followed with an uninspired ragu. They are now officially my apertivo stop *only*. At least they are cheap; ragu was 5 euro. and the wine and cocktail selection is good. They had a sparkling-wine version of a negroni I'll try next time.


"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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Lunch at zaza, near the market. Completely fine. Amelie (my almost-three year old) had pappa pomodoro, and I had the thinly sliced steak with truffle sauce and buried with rucolo. I am really starting to like things hidden by rucolo. Not only do they have a menu in english, but they have stickers. I find that suspicious, but the food was extremely simply and accurately executed.

Dinner was Osteria Spiritu Santo, on the eponymous piazza. We began with a very simple antipasti of boar sausage and cheese, and I had the gnocci gratinee with Truffles, which was subtle but delicious (a bit restrained on the truffle front) and Mr. Et Alors had the dish he found strangest on the menu - ravioli filled with ricotto and spinach, with lemon-zest creme sauce and salmon eggs on top. It tasted exactly like that. both dishes were very good. then we had gelato at the place on the oltrarno side of triana bridge. open late and very good.

Lunch today was at Bettola, and very peasant food. tripe Florentine style for me, lamb and peas for him, and riso with funghi for Amelie. Not impressive for his first experience of my favorite place, but I'm sure we'll return, since it's close to our apartment.

Amelie and I did find Perche no this morning, and took some fantastic gelato in. She had chocolate (as ever) nad fior de latte amarone (cherries) and I had the recommended fior de latte with honey and sesame, cafe mousse and orange something. I've got to be more thoughtful in my choices, as all three were great but had to be taken in singley as they did not go with each other.


"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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have you gone to GROM for gelato?

although it is rather chilly now, maybe hot chocolate shots at VESTRI or rivoire.

I have a list of winebars on my site in the newsletter part which are my places to stop for light lunches or meals..

Da Camillo is probably one of the REAL Florentine places left in town.

Sorry I didn't see your note before, I have been in Sicily for three weeks.

PS I go to Carabe for the granita more than the gelato. sorry to hear the production has fallen away!

I usually go to Vestri or Grom for the best now.

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If you had one meal to prove to a french-californian that italian food was good or even great, where in the florence area would you take him (including livorno or lucca)?

it shouldn't be three-star prices either.

His complaints are it's more expensive and no where as good as eating in paris. he's getting on my nerves.


"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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sorry I really don't bother with the fight anymore!

let him eat cake!!!

ha ha

there are so many fabulous places, but if he has a butter ,cream and fois gras palate, nothing will make him happy.

Most parisans I know adore it here!

starting with the coffee!

sounds like a party-pooper! I can always find something I like anywhere I go.

I am part french. and was trained as a french pastry chef, studied with Verge, and really TRIED to live in France, Italy wins for me hands down on so many sides of life.

Good luck.

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If you had one meal to prove to a french-californian that italian food was good or even great, where in the florence area would you take him (including livorno or lucca)?

it shouldn't be three-star prices either.

His complaints are it's more expensive and no where as good as eating in paris. he's getting on my nerves.

It's has nothing to do with "no where near as good as eating in Paris." "Tuscan" food is different from "Parisien" food. Either you like it or you don't.

However, ask him where you can get great pasta or risotto in Paris? You can't.

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Well, he definitely isn't a butter and foie gras guy. And I'll admit a lot of the food we've had has been executed a bit off-- dry rabbit, tough veal, harder than al dente rice. But I've also had some lovely moments of truffled gnocci and fried calf brain. He's actually a peasant-food guy, eating in the auvergne regions (though he doesn't like pasta.) In California, we eat with the same hyper respect for ingredients that I consider an Italian rather than a french trait.

Maybe it'll be the chianna beef, or a boar ossobuco, but I know there is something that will cause him to reconsider the food. He does adore the procuitto, sausage and the cheeses. I think we're having bad dining luck.

We ate at pepo today for lunch and while my pasta with boar ragu was awesome, he had pappa pomdoro and it was dull, and amelie's tagellitelli with prochini was watery and the mushrooms slimy. I wonder what the secrets of ordering are? Always get teh day's specials? Skip the pasta (as I saw earlier)?

Or maybe his french grumpiness is rubbing off on me. I feel like I'm not eating as well as I did last trip.


"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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The Last Supper-- Cammillo. thank god. It is decidedly tuscan food, but done as well as tuscan food can be done! Good stuffed eggplant starter, and two great dishes-- he had brain, I had chicken livers and beans. His brain was, I think, not as good as the one I'd had at Bettola, but he hadn't been there with me so he didn't know. :) He was very, very happy except with the Italian custom of not serving vegetables with the dishes (it does make things pricier than they look initially). My chicken livers with white beans and sage was perfectly executed. He shared a chocolate torte with Amelie, I had vin santo with biscotti, and all were very happy.

Buono sera, y'all.


"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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Last night in florence tonight before we head to Bologna for New Year. We've followed some very useful recommendations from the board here and our experiences were very positive overall.

Il Ritrovo

We ate here on Saturday evening and really enjoyed the food. Portions were a little on the large side but standard of the cooking was very good. I had a pasta dish with ragu ( it was like a short rigatoni but the name escapes me at the moment). It was perfectly cooked ans the sauce had the depth of flavour only achieved from long slow cooking. Very tasty but way too generous so I left half to leave room for the main event- the famous grilled Florentine rib steak with rocket and parmagiano. The beef was very similar to Irish grass fed beef - full of flavour and tender but with just enough chew to make it interesting. It was perfectly charred on the outside with a very rare centre within..it was everything we had hoped it would be. We shared a very good tiramisu and and a couple of excellent espressi to finish.

The lady who was front of house was very charming but a little under pressure as her two children were in the dining room and she had to juggle serving her guests with looking after them. There weren't many other diners there and I would say that overall it wasn't a memorable Saturday night experience but based soley on the food it was very good. I would probably go back for lunch rather than dinner next time.

Osteria Del Cinghiale Bianco

On a freezing cold day we arrived here for lunch without a booking and were warmly welcomed by the professional and courtious staff. In contrast with the previous evening, the room was nearly full and had a very relaxed and convivial atmosphere. I started with papardelle and wild boar ragu followed by roasted rabbit and my SO had the antipasti plate followed by linguini with black truffles.

Everything we ate was superb and had the unmistakable flavours of well sourced ingredients cooked with a lot of skill and care.

We have booked in again for dinner this evening and I will post my report tomorrow.

Hopefully it's as good as lunch!

Ciao!

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From a recent trip to Florence:

The Trattoria Antellesi, where I’d eaten last August twice. Warm welcome. One look at the menu; order spaghetti con vongole; no sorry (it’s Sunday night); so I had the tripes, not bad (which for non-Franco-fanatics = pretty damn good.). Bill with wine and green salad (quite fine), no dessert, water or coffee = 17.50 E.

The Trattoria Camillo where I’d dined very well six months ago. I started to order the very same things but shifted to fried veal brains instead of chicken, which was probably a mistake, since they needed a jolt of something that August’s chicken did not. The fried green tomatoes (previously marinated in vinegar) and zucchini blossoms (in February mind you; shame on you for breaking the Slow Food pact) were quite good with a bit of salt. The bill with wine, water, grappa and coffee (but no dessert) was 41 E.

The “Decima Musa” has been open just two years and was 20% full, almost all with our friends who have the Power of Yen. It was horrid. I had the tempura of gambas, whose batter was not burned but had a burned-taste. It came with an accompanying salad whose dressing was tart and after one taste, unapproachable. For my main I had a risotto – OK, admittedly, I wasn’t in Risotto-land – but with seafood that was expensive, it should have been great. Nope! Rice so undercooked it wasn’t al dente but al raw-way. Seafood one had to pick out of the mound of uncooked rice, like one did with a Coney Island grabber claw. Wine OK (with pix of lady on it like Yulia, the PM of Ukraine), water OK; but are wine and water why we come? Bill = 36 Euros.

The Trattoria Cibrèo (not to be confused with the food shop, café or restaurant of the same name – the block is sort of like that, that Zabar’s gradually took over) had been recommended by three different experts (one American, one French and one Italian.) The place opens at 12:50 on the dot, there’s a line outside at 12:45, like Mary’s Fish Camp and one almost scrambles for a seat (while I was warned there were only 5-6 tables, actually there are 8, seating 30 covers, and even if you lose out here, the bigger resto will accommodate you). The front window is bedecked with Slow Food/Osterie stickers with one other from a fish award association. So I ordered the fish soup that came with a bread toast topped with shredded cheese but without the rouille (as in France). It was superb; tasty, dense and spicy. Then I had a most unusual dish; what must have been quenelle-like chicken liver mousse slices that had a really distinctive sharp taste with a sauce the color of mustard that wasn’t. At the side of the plate was a genuine cooked cock’s head with comb and it came with divine potatoes cooked with tomatoes and carrots. I ended with the flourless chocolate tart. With wine, water, a grappa but no coffee the bill was 33 E (no credit cards – sorry.)


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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had dinner at Osteria Del Cinghiale Bianco last night and was very disapointed.

It is a nice place the staff was very friendly. It was the food I wasn't really very excited about.

I started out with one of the specials for a starter. Burratta from naples with shaved truffles. I know it's not truffle season, but I just spoke to my chef where I'm working and he said the truffles available now are decent and at 200 euro/kilo compared to 2000, I should take some home when I leave. Thought I'd give it a shot. The real problem was that the burratta was served so cold, that the truffle just couldn't find a way to be aromatic. The Burratta at Il Pizzaiuolo last week was far better, mostly just that is was more fresh, seasoned nicely and at room temp.

Next I had Parpadelle con Ragu Cinghiale. This was actually quite satisfying. Pasta was very good, nice bite and cooked well. I also liked the ragu. Not overly aromatic and the real essense of the boar was present. I wasn't blown away, but very satisfied.

Coniglio arrosto con potata - I had high hopes because I've had some great rabbit in Tuscany. Just not this night. It was as if they made this dish for staff meal at 5:30 and left one portion in the oven until I ordered it 4 hours later. Pretty much inedible. The sauce was decent, although pretty salty. I tend to see alot of sauces here that have alot of fat that hasn't been skimmed from the roasting. This wasn't the case, nice color and rosemary wasn't overpowering, just salty.

I didn't order any formagio, because my server said it was a fresh pecorino. I wasn't interested in any of the other cheeses which looked somewhat genaric (tellegio, parm-reg, gorganzola). I also passed on dessert, just because I never really order it unless something really stands out.

Maybe it was a bad night, and I think I just shouldn't have ordered the burratta. I'd probably give it a shot if someone else really wanted to try it out.

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I have been living in Florence for about five years now, and thought that I would weigh in with a few of my favorites.

For Fish:

Ristorante da Stefano: This restaurant has been around for while, and though it has opened and closed a few times it is still known as one of the best in Florence. Their business card proudly proclaims “Solo pesce, solo fresco, solo la sera” Only fish, only fresh, only the evening. The restaurant is in Galluzo, near the Firenze Certosa exit from the A1. It is sparsely decorated and truly concentrates on the food, my husband and I went there last week and had the mixed fish plate, which had oysters, crab, snails, clams, and various shrimp served with a variety of sauces. The wine list is quite good and gives many options in the 10-20 euro range. The plate cost 70 euro and was more than enough food for the both of us. Delicious and very good prices for fish in Florence.

Via Senese, 271 Galluzzo (fi) Tel: 055 2322618 www.ristorantedastefano.it Reservations Recommended.

Fuor d’acqua: The heavyweight in the Florentine fish scene at the moment. The ambiance is elegant, the place is huge, and the food amazing. A little expensive but worth it, they fly the fish in fresh from the Mediterranean Sea every day. The wine list is long, and he antipasto tasting is wonderful.

Via Pisana, 37r Firenze. Tel: 055 222299 Reservations Strongly Recommended

For Truffles:

Osteria Delle Tre Panche: Exactly as the name suggests Osteria of the three benches is just that. Three small table with benches all around line the walls of this tiny restaurant. The menu is large and almost everything very good, but the truffle menu is the worth the fifteen minute walk from the center. The tortelli stuffed with fresh pecorino in a truffle cream sauce melts in your mouth in such a way that you will want to eat truffles for everyday for the rest of your life.

Via a Pacinotti, 32r Tel:055583724 Reservations Recommended

For a Really Special Time:

Rossini: Though the price may put you off at first, the food and atmosphere are worth every penny. I have been there five times (every time my husband asks what I want for my birthday or Christmas, a dinner at Rossini is my answer), and every time has been a memorable meal. The best thing about Rossini, besides the arched ceilings, flawless service, and long, long wine list, is that each course is like opening a present. The menu may say one thing, but what arrives in front of you is something completely re-imagined. My dream job as a chef is to one day work at Rossini for Chef Assunto Migliore. I am usually not a huge fan of molecular styled cuisine, but when it is done right it is sublime.

Lungarno Corsini, 4, 50123 Firenze Tel: 0552399224 www.ristoranterossini.it Reservations strongly recommended.

La Tenda Rossa: Never been here, but I’ve heard it’s fabulous.

Piazza del Monumento, 9/14 50020 Cerbaia in Val di Pesa (Fi) Tel: 055 826132

For An Adventure Into The Countryside:

Enoteca la sosta del Rossellino: Set in a tiny piazza in Settingano this small, and charming restaurant has incredible gnocchi made without flour, and many other yummy Tuscan style dishes with a Sicilian influence. The view of Florence is amazing; the proprietor is the waiter and also a sommelier. His daughter is the chef. The feeling is homey and the price isn’t bad.

Via del Rossellino, 2r, 50135 Settignano (fi) Tel: 055697245

La Sosta del Gusto (Castello del Trebbio): Set hills to the south east of Florence this new restaurant has some the best food I’ve eaten in Florence. The theme is updated Tuscan, and the menu changes with the season every fifteen days. The bistecca is also the best I’ve ever had. It is choice meat from a farm very near the restaurant and is cooked over wood. If I could choose one restaurant for reasonable prices, and amazing food this would be it.

Via Santa Brigida 11, I’m not sure about the number, but I’ll update it as soon as I find it.

Hope these recommendations come in handy!

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I'm doing some research for my mother. She's going to be in Florence in mid-May with two and possibly all three or her grandkids, all of whom have good appetites and appreciate good food, especially when they are being treated to it.

My mother is 90, so she doesn't want to stand on line, nor does she want to go way out the way at night just to eat. So...centrally located perhaps, and not budget-busting, since she will be paying most of the time. She asked me to look up Camillo and Cibreo. Camillo sounds delicious, but a bit pricey. Cibreo sounds fun, but will she be standing on line just to get in?

I've been reading upthread, and it sounds like the following are recommend, but I don't have a great sense of cost on most of them.

Osteria De Cinghiale (not always great?)

Sostanza (get the steak Fl.?)

Trat. Antellesi

Alla Vecchio Bettola

Za Za (lunch spot near the mercato?)

Osteria Vini e Vecchi Saproi

Trat Sabatini (rustic, no tourists?)

Da Caffagio (sounds terrific...good value?)

If anyone has some details about the above or other easy to navigate restaurants in easy to find locations, reasonable prices, whether or not reservations are taken, etc., that would be very helpful. One of my nephews is in the restaurant biz in NY and hates places with tourists; he'd rather have mediocre food than hear English spoken. The other nephew is like a vacuum cleaner and loves everything. My daughter generally likes less meat and more veggies, but knows a good thing when it's on her plate.

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If you hit Trattoria Cibreo (the lower-priced spot that shares a kitchen with the ristorante) right as the doors squeak open, you won't have to wait. I realize that this may be an unfashionable hour for Florentines, but it worked out as a great strategy for us at other (usually busy) spots last year.

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I recall having an amazing Lasagne al Forno at Enoteca la Boccadama in Piazza Santa Croce. It didn't seem to be any different than an authentic lasagne bolognese, but in Florence.


Edited by genarog (log)

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If you hit Trattoria Cibreo (the lower-priced spot that shares a kitchen with the ristorante) right as the doors squeak open, you won't have to wait.  I realize that this may be an unfashionable hour for Florentines, but it worked out as a great strategy for us at other (usually busy) spots last year.

It's not only an unfashionable hour, but the grandchild who doesn't want to go to a place where he hears English spoken, is not going to be happy.

Go to Vecchia Bettola and have a meal that is as close as one gets to what Florence was in the sixties and seventies (last century). Loredana is as humble (despite his great success) as he was 30 plus years ago when we first met him. Good (true) Florentine food, nice surroundings, very little English spoken, fun experience, takes reservations at night.

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The Trattoria Cibrèo (not to be confused with the food shop, café or restaurant of the same name – the block is sort of like that, that Zabar’s gradually took over) had been recommended by three different experts (one American, one French and one Italian.)  The place opens at 12:50 on the dot, there’s a line outside at 12:45, like Mary’s Fish Camp and one almost scrambles for a seat (while I was warned there were only 5-6 tables, actually there are 8, seating 30 covers, and even if you lose out here, the bigger resto will accommodate you).  The front window is bedecked with Slow Food/Osterie stickers with one other from a fish award association.  So I ordered the fish soup that came with a bread toast topped with shredded cheese but without the rouille (as in France).  It was superb; tasty, dense and spicy.  Then I had a most unusual dish; what must have been quenelle-like chicken liver mousse slices that had a really distinctive sharp taste with a sauce the color of mustard that wasn’t.  At the side of the plate was a genuine cooked cock’s head with comb and it came with divine potatoes cooked with tomatoes and carrots.  I ended with the flourless chocolate tart.  With wine, water, a grappa but no coffee the bill was 33 E (no credit cards – sorry.)

John,

I was interested to read the above it took me back to my first trip to florence some years back. My girlfriend ordered the unassuming Collo Di Pollo, a lesson for anyone who opt's for "Pollo" as a safe dish!!

And as above yes it came complete with the aforementioned Cock's head proudly starring back at us. There was an italian couple next to us who looked equally as stunned when they ordered the same.

The sauce on the side as I recall was one the most pungent mayonaise I think I have ever tasted being (I would guess) made entirely with extra virgin oil. It wasn't to my taste, but then mayonaise shouldn't be made this way in my view

That said we have dined out on the chicken's head story many times, but one not for the faint hearted i'd say!

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What are some of the best places to eat in Florence but are not too expensive? I am planning to travel there in the Fall and I am a Culinary student on a budget. I want to try as many different places as I can without spending a furtune. Any help and recommendations would be greatly appreciated! :smile:

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If you hit Trattoria Cibreo (the lower-priced spot that shares a kitchen with the ristorante) right as the doors squeak open, you won't have to wait.  I realize that this may be an unfashionable hour for Florentines, but it worked out as a great strategy for us at other (usually busy) spots last year.

A brief update on my mother and the three grandkids. Of the places I recommended as a result of this thread, the only one they managed to hit was Trattoria Cibreo--and they all adored it--said it was their best meal by far, and the price of dinner wasn't too bad. Even my picky nephew who insists that it isn't authentic unless no one speaks English (and he does in fact speak Italian) was very impressed.

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Had a delicious lunch at La Cantinetta Verrazzano, located between the Duomo and the Ponte Vecchio (something's buggy about the eG hyperlink tool: choose English, then click on "Cantinetta"). It's the same family whose ancestor was the first to enter New York harbor and for whom the bridge in Jersey is named.

At the waiter's suggestion, we started with a variety of stuffed foccace, all of which were really good. Then, a selection of cheeses, pork salumi, boar salumi and a thing they call tuna, which if I understood correctly is chianina cooked for 12 hours in an 80o oven. It's served shredded and is terrific. The Verrazzano wines vary from pedestrian to quite good; they'll serve you a flight to compare.

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Prices were reasonable, about €30 pp (with copious wine).

Also two quite good dinners, both off the beaten path and perhaps attractive to those who seem to ask for "non-touristy" recommendations. The first came via the Slow Food guide book: Osteria del Bricco, across the Arno via the Ponte alle Grazie, then south about 10 minutes (by foot). Rustic, simple, not necessarily Tuscan food, but done solidly. Duck tagliatelle and the rabbit were the standouts. This place also won't break the bank, maybe €40 pp, including house wine + one bottle that we chose from the little dispensa in the back.

Better still was da Ruggiero [no web site], past the Pitti Palace, through the Porta Romana, and again about 10 minutes on by foot. More Tuscan, but still very rustic. Small, maybe 8 tables. The menu's broken up into antipasti, minestre (which includes the pasta choices), bollito (4 choices, two of which were tongue and trotters), humido, griglia, and arrosto. Standouts were the tortellini in brodo (though tablemates preferred those at Raul back here in Marche, which we ate a few nights earlier) and the lamb, which consisted of lesser cuts executed perfectly. They were unfortunately out of the piccione, which we were all jonesing to try. Big gaffe was dropping the secondi within seconds of removing the plates from the primi. Man, this has never happened to my in Italy, and I felt compelled to say something both to the waiter and then to the hostess upon paying. Granted, we had a 9:15 reservation, but they took it. Saying, "we had to close a little early tonight" was pretty lame. About €40 pp with house wine.

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Hello Guys, i will be arriving in Florence in December 29 !

I was reading the topic and had already written some good tips!

Do you know oder good sugestions ?

I will stay in Hotel Rex Florence Via Faenza 6, Firenze , 50123

Thanks!


Edited by Ronaldoebt (log)

Rio de Janeiro,Brasil.

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I would recommend Cantinetta Antinori, Buca Lapi, Procacci and Osteria di Passignano - all Antinori-owned, all superb. Ate at all 4 establishments when I was there 2 weeks ago. Had an amazing bottle of Chianti Classico '67 at Cantinetta followed by a '77 Vin Santo (both by Antinori) at Cantinetta A.

Now trying lamely to shed inches off my bistecca-enhanced waistline. :sad:

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I just returned from Italy and wanted to chime in on a great experience I had in Florence. I was wandering around the Santo Spirito market around lunchtime one afternoon. I stumbled across a little ristorante called Sant' Agostino 23. It was right around noon so I poked my head in and looked around. It was completely empty. After a minute of looking around someone came out and told me they would be open for lunch at 12:30. When I returned they handed me two menus. The regular daily menu and then an additional Quinto Quarto menu. I didn't even bother to open the daily menu. With the help of the waiter Stefano, (who I later learned is one of the owners)I chose the Musetto E Zampa (which was a headcheese type preparation made with the snout and trotters.) Very nice. Quite interesting and set the tone nicely for the primi...which was Chitarrine con lampredotto. I foolishly only got a half portion of this but I could have eaten a pound of this. It had a clean, soft flavor that is hard to come by in a lot of offal dishes. I thought the lampredotto may overpower the fresh pasta but it didn't at all. It may have been my favorite plate the entire week in Italy. Lastly, Stefano highly recommended I try the Cibreo di Rigalie. This famous Tuscan dish was fantastic. Maybe a few too many chicken livers for my liking but to me a few go a long way. It was a nice rustic dish to send me off with.

I spoke to Stefano for a few minutes as I was leaving. He and his staff were all very nice and quite passionate about sharing the traditional Tuscan dishes. I was thrilled that I stumbled across this place. Definitely will be a staple on my trips back to Florence.

http://www.santagostino.fi.it/

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I was fortunate enough to visit Florence this September, I actually did not check eGullet before the trip but after reading, it looks like my recommendation is shared with fellow members (I must be part of a good crowd :laugh: ). One real mind-trip was that the photo of the couple in front of the Cafe are acquaintances with an eGullet member! (see: http://egullet.org/p1302667 )

anyways, been itchin' to share my photos with people and I figured it would be appreciated here :biggrin:

Had a wonderful time at La Cantinetta Verrazzano, excellent wine and snacks that complemented beautifully.

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this is the only one I remember the name, it's tete de moine with aged balsamic

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right next door is also a great little restaurant, Ristorante Paoli, had a delicious black truffle risotto:

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and not a restaurant, but every eGullet-er should definitely visit the San Lorenzo market:

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Edited by Dan C. (log)

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