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Suvir Saran

Individual/Mini Cheesecakes

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Are chilled cheesecakes considered cheesecakes?

I82Much, I've been wanting to try that recipe for a long time coz it looks very simple and has good reviews.

I guess baking mini cheesecakes are easier? No cracking, leaving in oven for an hour, water-bath, etc?

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A nice cheesecake is the double decker raspberry and white chocolate cheesecake on epicurious.com. That makes a nice presentation when cut, so it should also work well in individual rings. I've only baked either as full cheesecakes or in sheet pans, then cut into cubes, but it looks great topped with raspberry coulis and shaved white chocolate.

Keep in mind, though, I'm a home baker, so can't even begin to imagine how it fits into a production environment.

But for dealing with service, I think ring molds are your best route. No cutting...clean edges...sounds like a winner.

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It's not hard to unmold a cheesecake inside anything. Just freeze it overnight, the next day used a torch/heatgun/hairdryer/hotwaterbath to warm the outsides of whatever mold (i.e. muffin pan) flip upside down and tap out onto a a holding tray. Allow to defrost in fridge before serving. It's not hard, you can do the very same thing with creme brulee or creme caramel. Which i do all the time to make my customers wonder how the hell do i bake a custard without using a dish.

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It's not hard to unmold a cheesecake inside anything.  Just freeze it overnight, the next day used a torch/heatgun/hairdryer/hotwaterbath to warm the outsides of whatever mold (i.e. muffin pan) flip upside down and tap out onto a a holding tray.  Allow to defrost in fridge before serving.  It's not hard, you can do the very same thing with creme brulee or creme caramel.  Which i do all the time to make my customers wonder how the hell do i bake a custard without using a dish.

I HIGHLY suggest you begin using this method! Freezing does NOT effect your cheesecake at all. Just makes it so easy to handle. It's how I handle most desserts.

When your top is browning before your center is set: your baking on too high of heat, turn your oven down.

Cheesecake baked off in sheet pans, really does make cheesecake bars because it's so shallow. For a great white chocolate cheesecake recipe I suggest the one published in Chocolatier magazine..........they choose it as one of their top 20 recipes.

You can use muffin tins, but don't use liners (for a more professional plated dessert). Fill them nice and full and do NOT over bake them so they sink in the middle. You just spray your muffin tin, bake, freeze and apply heat to release them from the pan. If your in a professional kitchen they should have a blow torch hanging around, use that-it's great.

You could bake in ramekins but you'd have to be alot more careful removing them so you don't chip the dishes. I'd rather see you use a muffin tin..........BUT I prefer the looks of the straight sided ramekins when their on the plate.

Technically you could use empty metal cans (well washed), one with-out ribs. I don't know if you buy anything in for the restaurant in that small of a size though. Otherwise I'd recommend buying silicone molds. I think they are the most versatile investment.

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I'll be making individual cranberry cheesecakes for Thanksgiving this year - do I need to make any adjustments to the recipe - or do anything else differently? Any and all and very detailed advice appreciated...

K

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I'll be making individual cranberry cheesecakes for Thanksgiving this year - do I need to make any adjustments to the recipe - or do anything else differently? Any and all and very detailed advice appreciated...

K

you should be able to use exactly the same recipe, you just need to measure how much each individual mould takes and make sure that a batch will fill all the moulds you require, as individuals can (sometimes) use more mix than one big one.

If it is a baked cheesecake just remember that it is going to take far less time to cook them than your recipe dictates, so keep a close eye one them.

as for any more detailed advice, need to see your original recipe. if you are unsure PM me and I will check it with my pastry chefs for you.

Alex.

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I'll be making individual cranberry cheesecakes for Thanksgiving this year - do I need to make any adjustments to the recipe - or do anything else differently? Any and all and very detailed advice appreciated...

K

you should be able to use exactly the same recipe, you just need to measure how much each individual mould takes and make sure that a batch will fill all the moulds you require, as individuals can (sometimes) use more mix than one big one.

If it is a baked cheesecake just remember that it is going to take far less time to cook them than your recipe dictates, so keep a close eye one them.

as for any more detailed advice, need to see your original recipe. if you are unsure PM me and I will check it with my pastry chefs for you.

Alex.

Thank you!

K

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Sure! You just need to adjust the baking time. Baking time for a recipe for cheesecake made in muffin tins (lined with paper or foil liners, using a wafer cookie on the bottom as the crust) is 25 minutes @ 325F.

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I recently bought a mini cheesecake pan that has 12 cups with removable bottoms. It takes just under half a normal recipe to fill it and it takes about 18 minutes at 325F to cook. The first ones I did completely cracked so the second time I placed a pan of water on the lower shelf when I turned the oven on to warm up. That seemed to take care of the cracking. They are a perfect size that you can still squeeze in even after a large meal. They are also fun to garnish and look lovely all dressed up on a plate.

You could click on the camera in this link for some inspiration as well as the recipe providing some instruction. The recipe was ok but I thought a bit dry. I would use the same concept but with my own filling recipe next time.


Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

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For perfect little cheesecakes, I never judge doneness by baking time.

Make the cheesecakes as little as you want, but make sure you bake just until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees F. Stick an instant-read thermometer into the center of one. This is foolproof.

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I am doing more dessert minis and am looking for the best way to do cheesecake minis. I've tried cutting a 9x13 pan into squares, but I don't get a nice clean cut. I've tried the mini cupcake pan with papers but I don't like how it looks. I tried a bigger cupcake pan yesterday and may remove the papers...they sank and cracked however. I really need some good tips to make some beautiful little minis. Pictures would be great also...and recipes!

Thanks a bunch!

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I've tried cutting a 9x13 pan into squares, but I don't get a nice clean cut.

You can get a nice clean cut if you freeze it first, then slice with a hot, wet knife. Wipe knife off

between cuts. :wink:

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Yeah, like Annie said frozen plus I use a big butcher knife and I stand on a step and just lean into the cut. Easy peasy, smooth, clean pretty cuts.

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I have this mini-muffin/tart pan from the Pampered chef. It's smaller than a small cupcake pan and you don't need liners (the non stick works very well). I use these for cheesecake bites on a regular basis.

For a friend's shower, I wanted something slightly bigger, so I did a sheet pan full of cheesecake and cut with a round cookie cutter - they were the diameter of a cupcake, but only about an inch high.

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Let me be the 3rd one to chime in on the freeze method. Thaw slightly, dip knife in hot water and wipe between slices. Makes for a messy towel and pitcher of water but really nice clean slices. Oh, and for a really clean look, don't forget to trip the edges of your square or rectangle before slicing -- the cook gets to eat the scraps . . . yum.

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I also agree on the cutting frozen/hot wet blade method if you're using the 9x13 pan to bake in.

If you're set on having round ones, I'd use the Flexipans or a similar silicone pan. I used to use my mini-muffin pans for this, but it was such a hassle to unmold, I stopped. If you use a no-bake recipe, fill the silicone and freeze, then pop them out onto a cookie round or tart shell if I want to have a dripping topping... otherwise bake as usual, freeze and go.

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People always ask me to make mini cheesecakes, I usually refuse citing the "quality loss" I usually just cut my round cheesecakes into squares and serve in a ramekin or muffin liner. I think individual ones are always overcooked and never look good. I use a cheeseblocker to cut them, I will never use a knife again.

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People always ask me to make mini cheesecakes, I usually refuse citing the "quality loss"  I usually just cut my round cheesecakes into squares and serve in a ramekin or muffin liner.  I think individual ones are always overcooked and never look good.  I use a cheeseblocker to cut them, I will never use a knife again.

No, no. Don't make round and cut square . . . too much waste. You can make cheesecakes in a square pan and then cut bites or bars the size you want. Check out my caramel cheesecake squares in the eGRA.

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I am doing more dessert minis and am looking for the best way to do cheesecake minis. I've tried cutting a 9x13 pan into squares, but I don't get a nice clean cut. I've tried the mini cupcake pan with papers but I don't like how it looks. I tried a bigger cupcake pan yesterday and may remove the papers...they sank and cracked however. I really need some good tips to make some beautiful little minis.  Pictures would be great also...and recipes! 

Thanks a bunch!

I bought some mini-cheesecake pans and they work fine but the do cook more quickly as they are much smaller.

What I've found works very well is to make a normal cheesecake in a 9x13 pan and then freeze and cut with cookie cutters. You will have some waste but can minimize that with a good cutting plan. What you get in return are pieces that look as though they were made to order not just cut with a knife. You can then decorate each one to further accentuate the individual nature. If the sides are not as clean as you like you can always dip in chocolate, icing or roll in nuts or another coating. I've not done these for a couple years but I still have people ask me about them all the time and even had a couple restaurants request I supply them. Personally, I love cheesecake but think they tend to be served in too large a portion and this is a great way to allow people to not be overwhelmed by too large a piece or you can create a sampler platter with several flavors which is what I always did.

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I make them in a 9 by 9, and it seems to work fine. Very nice cuts too, if you wipe in between slices--I didn't need the hot water trick.

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Silicone pans work great for mini cheesecakes. There are a bunch of different shapes to choose from and you can pop them right into the freezer and then the cakes unmold perfectly.

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At my shop we use the silicon molds for everything, mini cheesecakes come out perfect. Real short cooking time, chill to room temp, pop in the freezer overnite come in next day and unmold. They come out perfect.

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"What I've found works very well is to make a normal cheesecake in a 9x13 pan and then freeze and cut with cookie cutters. You will have some waste but can minimize that with a good cutting plan. What you get in return are pieces that look as though they were made to order not just cut with a knife. You can then decorate each one to further accentuate the individual nature. If the sides are not as clean as you like you can always dip in chocolate, icing or roll in nuts or another coating."

Love the nut idea and coating the edges... and plan to make little dipped ones. I tried the freezing method and will not do it any other way from now on. It seems so obvious now, don't know why I never thought of it before.

Another question...when you all do minis, do you always put each piece on a little doily or something? How big should a mini be...1 bite and a pricing question...I know it will vary, I am in the midwest. How much would you charge per each. I feel I am a low right now. I only box them, not tray them and they are 4 for $3.00. I don't mind being a little low now as I am learning but want to stay competitive and not underprice myself. THanks!

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I've seen a 12-cup pan especially for mini cheesecakes; it has a removable bottom for each straight-sided cup. Haven't seen it in action though.

http://www.amazon.com/Chicago-Metallic-Com...e/dp/B0006SJZJ8

I use this pan( not this exact pan, something similar). Here is a pic.( ignore the canned cherries, that is what the client wanted).

gallery_25969_665_431611.jpg Yesterday at work, I made cheesecake bars( no pic). I cut then in 12 squares( 13 x 9 pan) and then each square into a triangle.

I used a hot knife, they came out like a dream.

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