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Appetizers/Hors D'Oeuvres Ideas


Malawry
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Are miniature pappadums last year's thing?  If they are not passe, they make a nice canape to be topped by, maybe, something with a "curry" flavor.

yeah, like duck confit! but maybe not curry if you chose duck confit. maybe just some sliced scallion and a sprinkle of cinnamon. and a drop of hoison. i've been suggesting this for quite some time, but have never done it myself. i'll do it soon. i promise. :wink:

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I catered an event for kids in Bridgehampton a week or so ago... and the Corn Croquettes I made were an absolute hit with the adults.

I served them with a mint-yogurt chutney.

The croquettes had corn, chickpea flour, cilantro, green chiles, cayenne, onions, tiny hint of fenugreek and some garam masala.

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Ginger Grilled Creamy Chicken, cut into bite sized pieces and served with a green chile-scallion soy sauce dipping sauce.

This is always a huge success at parties I cater.

You can find the recipe for the grilled chicken in the chicken thread in the Indian forum.

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I serve tiny cakes made like crab cakes, but with potatoes and spinach (Aloo-Paalak kee Tikki). There is lots of cilantro and mint in the potato-spinach mix. Cayenne, salt, garam masala, chaat-masala and even a tiny amount of dried fenugreek leaves are perfect spicing. Shape the cakes and either deep fry them or bake in the oven.

Serve these with a tamarind-date sauce. They are addictive.

PS: For information on any of these ingredients, do a search and you can find the thread where they are explained. Or just browse through the Indian forum.

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Chilled stuffed grape leaves are always a big hit at parties I have catered.

I only ever serve the non-meat stuffed ones. People are amazed at the tangy-and gently herbed taste of these.

I stuff mine with rice, currants, onions, mint, dill, lemon juice and a pinch or two of Heinz Tomato Ketchup.

I garnish the stuffed leaves with lots of freshly chopped dill. And wash each stuffed leaf with a lemon juice, sugar and chopped dill wash.

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You can make a chunky Falafel kind of fritter that has lots of coarsely chopped herbs in it and also scallions, onion and chiles. Fry these or if you check the thread on Falafel in the Middle Eastern forum, Jason Perlow has shared a baking technique that she has successfully employed. These are a nice brown color finger food and also realy crunchy.

I often make these for catered events and serve them with a cross between humus and tahini sauce. I add some roasted red pepper puree and some harissa (chile condiment) into the humus and extra tahini and some orange juice and make a light and thin dipping sauce. People love the color and the subtle but apparent bite of the sauce.

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Cocktail Samosas with a mint chutney are excellent.

You can make them with home-made patti (pastry) or even use wonton skins or even phyllo. The stuffing can be a simple potato and pea mix with coarsely ground and toasted cumin and coriander seeds, lemon juice, cayenne and salt. Chopped cilantro is a must in this stuffing.

If you do not make them yourself, you can also find them available in Indian stores in the frozen goods section. These can be deep fried or even baked. And most people would bless you for serving these even if not made by yourself.

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Hello Helen,

Lot's of great ideas so far here. I don't recall reading how many you are catering for? Do you have access to ovens there? Or must everything be prepared and delivered as is? "Upmarket"? Not sure if that means NYC or Oxford Ohio? This is right up my alley but I need to know the variables. ;-))

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I have a couple of ideas. (If any sound interesting, I am happy to supply the recipe).

Tuna Tacos - seared tuna (rubbed with Chinese 5 spice powder) on crispy wontons with ginger/sesame mayo

Oysters with frozen Champagne mignonette

Jodi Adams' smoked salmon pizza with mascarpone cheese (can be cut for appetizer portions)

Thinly sliced roast beef in mini yorkshire puddings with horseradish sauce

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Numbers are 200.

Yes full access to ovens etc... we will be serving the food at the party.

Upmarket means trendy, high budget, high quality fare for clients who are bankers mid 30's-40's and travel the world dining from the best.

They want theatrical food with impact - great flavours of course.

thanks

Helen

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I just happened to see a recipe I thought was very interesting in a British magazine called (I think) "Food & Travel". It was for little tomato leather cones (like fruit leather, but made with fresh tomatoes, basil and - wait for it.... ketchup) filled with haricot verts tossed with pesto. Sounded tasty and looked very avant-garde and "upmarket".

[disclaimer: I'm not a professional chef or caterer]

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Hello Helen,

I have to chuckle here.. There are so many fabulous appetizers too numerous to name. They sound like you have to invent something they have never had before to impress the punters? Don't put that much pressure on youself kiddo. Julia never did. They will be throwing back a few. ;-)) Go with some egullet suggestions and Beluga doesn't hurt I guess.

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PACIFIC OYSTERS WITH FROZEN CHAMPAGNE MIGNONETTE

MAKES 24 OYSTERS

INGREDIENTS:

24 each oysters

The Mignonette:

1/4 cup shallots

3/4 cup pickled ginger

1/2 cup champagne

1/2 cup sugar

2 tablespoons cracked black pepper

3/4 cup rice wine vinegar

1 tablespoon chopped chives

Preparing the Mignonette:

1.) Place ingredients in food processor and puree for one minute. Remove

and place mixture in 9" pie tin and freeze.

2.) Shuck oysters and place on service platter. Scrape 1 teaspoon of frozen

mignonette and place on top of each oyster.

3.) Garnish each oyster with a sprinkle of chives. Serve immediately.

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