Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Paris 3-5 December


jackal10
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm in Paris for two nights (3rd, 4th Decemebr 2004), at a meeting. However the evenings are free.

The bad news is that the meeting is on the outskirts at Bercy, but nowhere is that far.

Where should I eat, seriously? Where is current? Gagnaire? ADPA? Robuchon?

What chance a booking?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Far too personal a choice for me to make any input without more of a sense of what you want, but you should know that Robuchon only takes reservations for the the first sitting. That's 5:30, or is it 6:30, for dinner. Once one settles in to Paris time, it seemed very early to eat, although we tried for a next day reservation for dinner and couldn't get it. I suspect it's not that hard a month in advance. Where are you staying, or rather do you have the services of a good concierge? That's an advantage of sorts, but a call a month or more in advance will usually secure a reservation on one of the top places. Fax works well and I'm pretty sure we made our reservation for Arpege by e-mail just under a month in advance of the date. E-mail is getting much more reliable. There was a times when French restaurants and hotels had e-mail addresses, but seemed to check their mail once a month.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Far too personal a choice for me to make any input without more of a sense of what you want, but you should know that Robuchon only takes reservations for the the first sitting. That's 5:30, or is it 6:30, for dinner. Once one settles in to Paris time, it seemed very early to eat....

Although it's a perfect time to eat on the day you arrive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, your question is far too general ...

You surely know that Gagnaire and ADPA, for instance are quite 'opposite' experiences.

Gagnaire being very creative, with lots of flavours (some dishes include more than 10!) and surprises,

whereas ADPA delivers much more 'classical' french cuisine.

If you like classic 'with a twist', I've had wonderful experiences at L'Ambroisie, place des Vosges.

But it might be difficult to get a reservation. Try to call as soon as possible.

If you tell us what cuisine style you like, it would be very helpful :smile:

"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd really like whatever is deemed fashionable.

I like lots of small courses, and a "molecular gastronomy" sort of approach (Blumenthal, Adria, Keller, Achatz...)

Alternatively good bourgois cooking - stuffed pigs trotters, andoilettes. Some things that cannot be had, or are not as good anywhere else.

Edited by jackal10 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Molecular cuisine, I think, defines Pierre Gagnaire's cuisine quite well.

If you like inventive food, a good try (though I've never been, but I am desperate to go)

is L'ASTRANCE, Tél: 01.40.50.84.40: 4, Rue Beethoven. in the 16th arrondissement.

I have heard nothing but praise for this rising star of french cuisine.

Reservations might be _very_ hard to get ...

Or, another inventive star (I believe his knickname is "The Paris suburb's El Bulli")

is Jean Chauvel's restaurant :

LES MAGNOLIAS, 48, avenue de Bry - 94170 Le Perreux. tel.01 48 72 47 43

It's got a michelin star. About 30 minutes from Paris, near Nogent-sur-Marne.

It's maybe 20 minutes drive from Bercy...

"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with Mike on that. Well at least as far as recommending Pierre Gagnaire if you like El Bulli and Blumenthal although he's quite different from those two, who are also different enough from each other. L'Astrance may be one of the hardest reservations in Paris to get. I suspect that's a sign it's fashionable, for whatever that means. I ate there some time ago. I'd like to go back and see how the food has progressed. It was a fascinating meal then. I ate at Les Magnolias on the same trip during which I had my second meal at Gagnaire and felt the need to compare the two. I was less impressed with Les Magnolias than most other posters here so far. All of the dishes were interesting, but I didn't feel they gelled successfully. It's out of town in the suburbs, but quite near a commuter train. This could be a hotter place in the future, if you want to try something a little ahead of the fashion curve.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bercy is now considered to be one of the most exciting neighborhoods in Paris. Newly gentrified, it is full of activity, including restaurants and nightlife. I think there is a new Sofitel in Bercy-- will you be staying there?

One of the highly touted places in Bercy is L'Oulette, 15 Place Lachambeaudie. Patricia Wells has raved about the place in her discussions about Bercy, and the Pudlo loved the place as well. An emphasis on Southwest (France) cuisine, including tiny calamari, haricots blancs, foie gras, goat cheese, and indigenous wines. Pudlo raves about his millefeuille de sardines, which gets my mouth watering just describing it.

There should be many other good choices on the beautiful avenue Emile Zola, the main drag in Bercy. Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many thanks for the replies. What a wonderful resource is eGullet!

Yes. I am staying at the Bercy Sofitel.

According to the blurb it is " 7 minutes from Place de la Madeleine by the Meteor (automatic subway). "

That means a trip to Fauchon may be required as well...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually "L'Oulette", is the ONLY gastronomic choice near Bercy, unless you count Le Quincy or La Biche au Bois..

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually "L'Oulette", is the ONLY gastronomic choice near Bercy, unless you count Le Quincy or La Biche au Bois..

I do not agree. Ironically, the France Magazine November Issue has just arrived in my mailbox and has a small article " Bercy Reborn" where it talks about Bercy now being one of " the hippest and trendiest neighborhoods of Paris." On the web site there is a brief summary of the article here.

Another restaurant well spoken of is Le Petit Plat, 49 av. Emile Zola. And I'm sure a stroll around the quayside and the neighborhood will uncover many gastronomic delights. There are also many architectural delights in Bercy as well, including the French National Library, a project of Mitterand.

I think you are actually lucky to be staying in Bercy; please report back to us after your trip!! Bon séjour!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bercy Park is a delightful park, and Paris to its credit had done well in making modern parks withing the city limits. The allée along the Viaduc des Arts, also in the 12th arr. and the Park Citroën in the 15th are two other good examples. The Cour St.-Emilion is a delighful place, but like the South Street Seaport in NY, and all those Rouse developments in the states, it strikes me as the type of place that will draw tourist restaurants, rather than destination restaurants or neighborhood restauarants and eating there seems fraught with the same problems I have just with the idea of eating in shopping malls and theme parks. The photograph on your link is of the cour and it's a charming place to stop for coffee or a beer, but no place looked inviting for lunch, let alone dinner. Nevertheless, it's a well done job architecturally and worth a visit for the tourist who's seem most all of historical Paris. The phrase "the hippest and trendiest neighborhoods of Paris" immediately reminds me that the hippest and trendiest restaurants in NY and Paris, are quite often not the ones with the best food. Often they are the ones where food is an after thought.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, that is an interesting point; unfortunately, I have never been personally to Bercy yet, just haven't made the time-- hope to get there next June or September...

Patricia Wells, recognized as a great foodie, has been touting the area for a couple of years now in the IHT...

And we await a first-hand report from Jackal in December!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FYI, a quick check brought up 2- one star Michelin restos in Bercy; check the Guide Rouge for more details, but here are the names:

Au Trou Gascon

40, rue Taine

Au Pressoir

257, av. Daumesnil

Several other 3-fork choices as well. Bon appétit!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. I am staying at the Bercy Sofitel.

According to the blurb it is " 7 minutes from Place de la Madeleine by the Meteor (automatic subway). "

That means a trip to Fauchon may be required as well...

Sofitel Bercy is wonderful. Its a little gem that has a warm feel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

jackal, would love to join you for dinner but I work both those nights - but at least I can recommend what you should have at ADPA! What's current for us there is the white truffles - giant scallops, bleu lobster, and Bresse Chicken - I've tasted them all and they're all amazing. And everyone wants to try Robuchon - I'm not a fan - but if you do, you can reserve for dinner as a hotel non-guest at 18:30 only. And yeah, I like the Bercy area - very cool, lots of history - the old white wine warehouses - but you're close to everything central too. Bon voyage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I am now in the Sofitel in Bercy, listening to a lecture on broadband antenna design theory. When I was an undergraduate antenna theory lectures sent me to sleep. Now, thanks to Wifi, I can type an entry to eGullet!

Last night, on your reccomendation we went to L'Oulette (Marcel Baudis). We needed a local restaurant after a heavy day.

Menu de Saison (46EU) including wine

Amuse

Veloute de potimarron aux chataigned grille, tartine au foie gras

ou

Terrine de Lapin au Foie Gras genievre, "chutney" de poires au gingembre

ou

FIlet de saumon d'Ecosse, mi cuit, graines de samae et creme d'avocat, blinis de seigles aux algues

-o0o-

Pave de quasi de veau, topinambours etuves aux echalotes caramelisees, jus de veau aux cepes

ou

Filet de dorade a la coriandre, flan d'aubergine et boulghour aux legumes

ou

Confit de canard grille, galette de pommes de terre charlotte a la ventreche, salad de roquette

-o0o-

Fromage de sud-ouest

-o0o-

Parfait aux marron glaces perfume au rhum

ou

Gateau chocolat moelleux anux mendiants, lait tiede au cacao a la cardamome

ou

Soupe au lait de coco, gele d'ananas, tuile coco

-o0o-

Cafe etc

Competant and very pleasant, and I thought good value. Almost like a refined version of home cooking. Nice room, but nothing over the top.

The amuse were salmon mousse and cubes of goat cheese

I had the pumpkin soup, confit of duck. parfait (slightly hard)

The wines were a white from Langedoc, and a young Cahors.

My compnaion had the Terrine, the dorade and the Soupe au lait de coco, which were described as "heaven and heaven again"

Smoking is alive and well in France, but mostly restricted to cigars after dinner. I guess the cigar trade has increased dramatically, with even the hotel bar featuring a large humidor.

Where should I go tonight?

Edited by jackal10 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please tell us your impressions of the Bercy neighborhood-- is it hip and exciting, or a turn-off touristy area?

2 restaurants in Michelin get 1 star (From earlier post)

Au Trou Gascon

40, rue Taine

Au Pressoir

257, av. Daumesnil

Thanks for the report on L'Oulette. Patricia Wells scores points....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since I'm not particularly hip and happening I can't really tell. Also its raining

Did not strike me as anything amazing, but a fairly standard modern city centre rejuvenation. The Meteor driverless metro is pretty cool, and I guess making the area easily acccesible from central Paris helps lots.

The hotel is a standard conference hotel, with things (like the internet connectivity, and slightly surly staff) not quite working in a typical french manner. For example the restaurant table was not available last night until 8pm, becasue the restaurant did not open until 8pm. The credit card machine was not working, because the telephone line to it had broken, but they made an exception and plugged it in to the the phone line chef used for ordering supplies in the kitchen...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not agree. Ironically, the France Magazine November Issue has just arrived in my mailbox and has a small article " Bercy Reborn" where it talks about Bercy now being one of " the hippest and trendiest neighborhoods of Paris."

well, the phenomenon of gentrification has turned the Bercy neighborhood into a pale imitation of what it used to be. 15 years ago, you could wander though the paved alleys, and visit the wine merchants and producers. It had a strong identity.

Now, everything has been rebuilt, and although the result is inviting and efficient, it's lost its soul. Now, you find the usual french food chains, offering mediocre food while making you believe it's authentic. And boy, it doesnt come cheap.

Go walk in some parts of north-eastern Paris, or at "la butte aux cailles". Then the left bank, 5th and 6th arrdts, are still my favorite hoods in the city of lights.

Eddy M., Chef & Owner

Se.ed Artisan Foods, Vancouver BC

Follow Se.ed's growth at: http://spaces.msn.com/members/fromseedtofood/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trendy is not usually what I want at home in NY and I suspect it's not what most travelers want in Paris. For some, it's a magnet, but for many others the Paris we either read about in literature or the one we knew ourselves is often the one we want to find (again). In fact, mediocre food is almost always what "trendy" has to offer. The soul of a city is not in its trendiest neighborhoods.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think we are getting caught up in semantics here.

I would consider my favorite neighborhood in Paris, Le Marais, (4th) to be a hip place. I base this on the people you see, (about 80% locals, 20% tourists), the restaurants, bars and cafes, and the shops and the types of merchandise they sell. I love the overall ambiance of the area, love to stay here. The restaurants range from corner bistro to elegant Michelin-star. There are many unique artisanal shops as well.

I think we are getting stuck on the word "trendy".

I plan to explore Bercy extensively on my next trip to La plus belle ville du monde!!

Edited by menton1 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with cour St. Emilion is that it's a shopping mall that was designed and built at once. It's comepletely removed from the organic city that grew building by buidling and shop by shop.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...