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Montreal fish markets / sushi grade


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My suggestions would include:

Poissonnerie Nouveau Falero

5726 Ave. Du Parc Avenue

Montreal, QC H2V4H1

(514) 274-5541

La Mer

corner of Rene Levesque and Papineau

As far as proximity to the West Island, Pecheur du Marche is an excellent choice. Contrary to the implication in the name, it is not at Marche de la ouest but is on des Sources, close to the market. 'Big Al' runs a very good business where you won't find the diversity of products available at la Mer, but you will find sushi grade tuna and other fine fish.

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Most fish stores offer good grade fish. Tuna is usualy qualified as sushi grade or grill grade if it is a bit older (less expensive). As of salmon, I have eaten raw salmon tons of times and never had any problems. I always tell the guy there what I intend to do with my fish when I want to eat it raw. Only one time did the clerk told me the fish was not fresh enough to eat raw (it was tuna).

As for the stores, I have a few that I like.

Poissonnerie Antoine on Du Park has good products.

Shamrock at Jean-Talon Market is good too.

Price wise, I think Norref on Molson just south of Saint-Joseph, cant be beaten. They have a parking.

They have a very good selection of fish and have good volume so they have about everything, they often have Bar from Chile. They also have a wide selection of Oysters and will make you taste them. Lobsters and crab prices in the spring/summer are usualy the best umong specialised fish stores.

It is not your typical friendly family buisness, but they have good fish and great prices.

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I like to buy fish at Le Pecheur on Sources boulevard in DDO (near the Starbucks). The fish is very fresh, IMHO. Note, I'm NOT refering to "Peche Peche" at the marché de l'ouest. That's usually more expensive and not as good. There was also a Japanese place on Green or Victoria that had so-called "sushi-grade" fish but I'm not sure they are still around.

Du beurre ! Donnez-moi du beurre ! Toujours du beurre ! (Fernand Point)

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  • 2 weeks later...

As suggested above, Pecheur du Marche is, IMHO, the best choice on the West Island. Here are the coordinates:

Pecheur Du Marché

Address : 3464, boulevard des Sources, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, QC H9B 1Z9

Telephone : 514-683-3474

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I was there already twice, and everything looks fresh, but I would be looking for even better place.

When I checked whole Salmon, the eyes, they didn't look "just from the water". I'll try to find what days they get Salmon, and to come the same day.

Tuna (previously frozen of course), while being fresh, contains tons of water and falls apart in hands...

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As I've said, stay away from the West Island if you're going to do this. You're not going to find the quality you want because I think that the West Island's supply chain is built to supply families and convenience food.

There was also a Japanese place on Green or Victoria that had so-called "sushi-grade" fish but I'm not sure they are still around.

The Japanese place on Victoria (Westmount) is Miyamoto and they're still around. You can do better elsewhere for the fish.

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As I've said, stay away from the West Island if you're going to do this. You're not going to find the quality you want because I think that the West Island's supply chain is built to supply families and convenience food.

Such sweeping generalisations are, as a rule, unworthy of reply.

However it would be a disservice to those who may want to avail of the efforts of a dedicated and competent fishmonger in close proximity to where they live, if I did not set the record straight. I shop or have shopped on a regular basis at la Mer, Nouveau Falaro, Shamrock (MJT) the Atwater Market fish shop and Pecheur du Marche (blvd des Sources). Pecheur du Marche holds its own with these shops except in the more exotic species. If you are looking for lobster, clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, tuna, sea bass, swordfish, salmon (farmed or wild), trout, cod haddock, red snapper and many other types of fish, P du Marche is an excellent choice. Their smoked salmon, sliced to order, is amongst the city's finest. If it's black cod or octopus or sea urchin or other less common species, then you are better off at say, la Mer. I have prepared tuna tartare, tuna sashimi and several recipes from the Nobu Now cookbook with fish purchased from 'Big Al" at P du M. and always with great success. I would estimate that I have shopped their in excess of 40 times in the last two years. On only one occassion was I not as happy with the product and returned it to the store. It was replaced without discussion with a carefully inspected replacement portion. My business partner who lives closer to Atwater Market than to P du M nevertheless makes a point of shopping there.

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...If you are looking for lobster, clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, tuna, sea bass, swordfish, salmon (farmed or wild), trout, cod haddock, red snapper and many other types of fish, P du Marche is an excellent choice.

Well, may be you could advise me... I enter into the store, I see large piece of tuna on the shelf. Looks beautiful. Is it the one you make sashimi of? I asked a piece of it (twice during two weeks) - and drove home right away. At home I found lots of water in there, and I couldn't slice it nicely with the very best of my knives (I use Hattori and Masahiro) - as it was falling apart. Both times I tried it happened. From the very beginning it didn't look and didn't feel like a tuna real sashimi usually made from. Did I chose wrong cut? Do they have different cuts for grilling and sushi?

Edited by doronin (log)
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As I've said, stay away from the West Island if you're going to do this. You're not going to find the quality you want because I think that the West Island's supply chain is built to supply families and convenience food.

Such sweeping generalisations are, as a rule, unworthy of reply.

Well, you have therefore had more success than I in purchasing acceptable seafood at P du M than I have. I was not wowed with my visits there; perhaps it was the day of the week that I visited, perhaps the season, or perhaps that I'm not in the trade.

I still have more success with La Mer or Gidney's, and I still think you won't find it on the West Island because I don't think that fresh fish as a food item moves as much in this region.

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...If you are looking for lobster, clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, tuna, sea bass, swordfish, salmon (farmed or wild), trout, cod haddock, red snapper and many other types of fish, P du Marche is an excellent choice.

Well, may be you could advise me... I enter into the store, I see large piece of tuna on the shelf. Looks beautiful. Is it the one you make sashimi of? I asked a piece of it (twice during two weeks) - and drove home right away. At home I found lots of water in there, and I couldn't slice it nicely with the very best of my knives (I use Hattori and Masahiro) - as it was falling apart. Both times I tried it happened. From the very beginning it didn't look and didn't feel like a tuna real sashimi usually made from. Did I chose wrong cut? Do they have different cuts for grilling and sushi?

I am by no means an expert on the cut. I tell them (Al or Joe preferably) that I will be using the fish for sashimi. If you have had a bad experience do not be shy to tell them. Explain your past disapointments and ask to see the fish close up. They are reasonable people and they'd like your continuing business.

If the fish is a large piece it can be somewhat difficult to cut into the fine pieces that the best sushi houses are known for. Once again I am no expert so my advice may not be supported by the purists. However I cut the fish into more manageable portions and I often place it in my freezer for about 10 or 15 mins (sometimes longer depending on the size of the pieces) which adds a level of firmness that makes slicing into smaller pieces much easier. Depending on the size of the portion purchased I find that sometimes part of the piece may lend itself more to making tartare, while another portion is suitable for sashimi. Study this before breaking down the piece.

If you do not get satisfaction then try some of the other fine recommendations that have been made. My advice however would be to get to know your fishmonger and become a regular at the establishment on which you finally decide. This is almost certain to pay long term dividends.

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I second the idea to freeze the fish. The best omokase freeze their tuna, sometimes for months.

I had a wonderful dinner last April at Yasuda in New York, second perhaps only to Masa, and spoke at length with Yasuda himself about this very subject. He "ages" all of his tuna this way.

I have heard that Masa does the same.

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I second the idea to freeze the fish. The best omokase freeze their tuna, sometimes for months.

I had a wonderful dinner last April at Yasuda in New York, second perhaps only to Masa, and spoke at length with Yasuda himself about this very subject. He "ages" all of his tuna this way.

I have heard that Masa does the same.

That, of course, a matter of taste, but anyways I'm doubt they meant to use home freezer for that purpose.

AFAIK, tuna frozen almost instantly and kept under -40C stays as good as it gets - assuming right conditions for thawing. But I'm seriously doubt it can be reproduced at home without the proper equipment.

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I second the idea to freeze the fish. The best omokase freeze their tuna, sometimes for months.

I had a wonderful dinner last April at Yasuda in New York, second perhaps only to Masa, and spoke at length with Yasuda himself about this very subject. He "ages" all of his tuna this way.

I have heard that Masa does the same.

That, of course, a matter of taste, but anyways I'm doubt they meant to use home freezer for that purpose.

AFAIK, tuna frozen almost instantly and kept under -40C stays as good as it gets - assuming right conditions for thawing. But I'm seriously doubt it can be reproduced at home without the proper equipment.

True. You do need a first rate commercial freezer. Yasuda has a custom freezer for this very purpose.

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I second the idea to freeze the fish. The best omokase freeze their tuna, sometimes for months.

I had a wonderful dinner last April at Yasuda in New York, second perhaps only to Masa, and spoke at length with Yasuda himself about this very subject. He "ages" all of his tuna this way.

I have heard that Masa does the same.

That, of course, a matter of taste, but anyways I'm doubt they meant to use home freezer for that purpose.

AFAIK, tuna frozen almost instantly and kept under -40C stays as good as it gets - assuming right conditions for thawing. But I'm seriously doubt it can be reproduced at home without the proper equipment.

True. You do need a first rate commercial freezer. Yasuda has a custom freezer for this very purpose.

This is a very interesting piece of information. I was not aware of this 'aging' concept.

By way of clarification, my advice to place the non-frozen tuna in the freezer for a short period was more to make the flesh firmer, thereby allowing the knife to make a cleaner, smoother cut.

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